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View Full Version : Just to shame those folks who have larger power machines



J Tiers
03-15-2017, 01:08 AM
You know, the folks who like to talk about how carbide requires more power and bigger machines (like theirs).....:D

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e0yM5fHjxqc&feature=youtu.be

Forrest Addy
03-15-2017, 01:52 AM
Yeah, That's about how I ran a radial arm drill in 1964 when I was an apprentice. 3" holes, 700 rpm, 0.040 feed per rev in 4" thick manganese steel. Chips flew for 30 feet. Had to tie the arm to the bed so it wouldn't deflect up under feeding force.

Safety guys wanted to write me up but the boss chased them out.

Wooden ships and iron men.

Seriously that was a hell of a demo. I wondered about the funny flute design but the slow-mo shows how it's critical to chip breaking and evacuation. I speculate the air through the coolant feed holes not only flushes the chips but more importantly cools the drill.

michigan doug
03-15-2017, 06:59 AM
Like butta...

Pretty impressive.

DATo
03-15-2017, 07:50 AM
Granted, very cool, but I'd have to get a second mortgage on my house to buy a set of those drills. I could get the Chinese version of these carbide drills cheaper but they only work on aluminum. [:- (

boslab
03-15-2017, 08:26 AM
Suprisingly a 0.8 MM titex carbide will punch through 6mm square bar in sub second, the NC, yes that old, driller at a place I worked was doing 70 holes a min, first time I saw it I didn't beleive it, the thing was drilling like a demented sewing machine. (Making dog or horse combs)
Those triple flute things are amazing, wonder how the holes get in them, must be one hole at the shank to couple to the cutting lube/coolant/magic liquid.
I've been watching a few videos lately on gun drilling, the one I caught yesterday was a guy making native flutes, he had a gun drill in a wood lathe, air blown down the coolant port to blow the chips out
It was working beautifully apart from the fact he had got a 4 jaw tailstock with required through hole it was a standard lathe.
I'm wondering if these triple lip drills are behaving like a gun drill and self guiding.
Anyway a very interesting clip,
Mark

achtanelion
03-15-2017, 08:33 AM
I'm not sure why I enjoy the sound of chips hitting the enclosure so much.

boslab
03-15-2017, 08:46 AM
Like rain on a tin roof. Puts you to sleep
Mark

mars-red
03-15-2017, 08:49 AM
You guys watched the bit at the very end, right? I was fairly impressed even before seeing that.

achtanelion
03-15-2017, 09:51 AM
You guys watched the bit at the very end, right? I was fairly impressed even before seeing that.

Holy cow! I'd closed the video when it seemed to be nothing more than a static ad anymore. It spends more time letting the axes settle than drilling.

chipmaker4130
03-15-2017, 10:02 AM
. . . I wondered about the funny flute design . . .

The end of that thing looks a lot like a conventional endmill to me.

vpt
03-15-2017, 12:21 PM
The end of that thing looks a lot like a conventional endmill to me.

That's what I was thinking.

Pretty impressive hole drilling! Almost as fast as I can do it on my atlas!

JRouche
03-15-2017, 02:56 PM
Those triple flute things are amazing, wonder how the holes get in them,
Mark

They are cast in. JR

RB211
03-15-2017, 03:16 PM
You should rename the topic to something along the lines of CNC Envy...
I do not understand the currently selected name for this topic, unless they were using a South Bend 9" lathe with flat belt?

Dan Dubeau
03-15-2017, 04:33 PM
I use Dormer's ADX drills at work for doweling blocks together. 7500rpm (machine max) 40-60 ipm in aluminum, no spot, no peck. Perfect "tight" slip fit for a dowel, on location within a thou. High performance drilling is awesome. Just wish we had more spindle and HAASpower. Also use the same drills in steel (o1-4140ph....etc). they last damn near forever in aluminum, but after a while they get a bit of a built up edge from mic6 tooling plate, and the holes get a bit shloppy. When I notice that I'll plunk a few holes in a piece of steel, and they're good for another couple hundred holes.

I think the highest I went with the 1/4" was 120ipm. Took a while and some experimenting before I dialed in the feeds in different materials. Really surprised me how the feedrate affects the hole size. Slower in alum made a bigger hole, faster made a tighter hole, until it got to a certain point then it got bigger again.

sawlog
03-15-2017, 04:45 PM
Yes they do. I use it all the time. https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20170315/366e319ae8638eda1104990825e0e44d.jpg[IMG]https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20170315/366e319ae8638eda1104990825e0e44d.jpg[/IMG

See on my Grizzly


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

wierdscience
03-15-2017, 10:35 PM
You could buy that machining center,those drills and the A series taps and go into 1-2-3 block production ;)