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Viperspit
04-29-2017, 01:28 PM
What are some of ways you protect the table of your knee mill? This short video shows how I have been doing it for decades. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sJSwRMEhH1o
This is one of the things my father taught me when I first started the trade and I have used it ever since. It is simple an cheap. Are there other ways you guys use? This old dog is always ready to learn new things.

Steve

BCRider
04-29-2017, 01:39 PM
I've never used anything up to now. I just don't put things onto the table. And I made a T slot cleaner. Never really thought about it. But after seeing a lot of the You Toobers using covers that are the same or closely similar to yours I'm thinking it's not a bad idea. Just need a "round tuit".....

I've got some offcuts of 1/8" HDPE from the cutting table mat material I bought a few years ago. I might use that since it won't be affected by oil over time like the hardboard will do. Not that the hardboard isn't cheap and easily replaced. And there's nothing wrong with a little oil soaked into the hardboard.

Ya know what might be nice? Hardboard covers made from the hardboard with the smooth dry erase surface on it We could use dry erase markers to jot down numbers or notes during a job. Or if the same stuff would easily clean up if common pencils were used on it.

Viperspit
04-29-2017, 02:47 PM
Hi BCRider,

"Ya know what might be nice? Hardboard covers made from the hardboard with the smooth dry erase surface on it We could use dry erase markers to jot down numbers or notes during a job. Or if the same stuff would easily clean up if common pencils were used on it."

That is a good idea. I never thought of that. I am always looking for a piece of paper to jot down some numbers.

Steve

Frank Ford
04-29-2017, 03:10 PM
I keep 1/6" neoprene sheets on the mill table - easy to shake clean, and with them hanging over the edges, they shed chips and allow me to use the air hose to blow things off with no chance of driving dirt or anything onto or into the ways. I do a fair bit of wood milling, so I have similar oversize neoprene shrouds over everything else, including the DRO scales. Never even a need to set up anything to change from wood, plastic, steel, or whatever:

http://www.frets.com/HomeShopTech/Magnets/RubberSheet/millshroud.jpg

Rex
04-29-2017, 05:41 PM
I have been using plastic covers. The problem with them is hot chips stick to them. My next set will be aluminum

KMoffett
04-29-2017, 05:52 PM
.....
Ya know what might be nice? Hardboard covers made from the hardboard with the smooth dry erase surface on it We could use dry erase markers to jot down numbers or notes during a job. Or if the same stuff would easily clean up if common pencils were used on it.

I like it! like this:
http://www.homedepot.com/p/Marker-Board-Common-3-16-in-x-2-ft-x-4-ft-Actual-0-180-in-x-23-75-in-x-47-75-in-7012090/203377708

Ken

BCRider
04-29-2017, 06:16 PM
I like it! like this:
http://www.homedepot.com/p/Marker-Board-Common-3-16-in-x-2-ft-x-4-ft-Actual-0-180-in-x-23-75-in-x-47-75-in-7012090/203377708

Ken

Another product they have in the US HD's but not up here. Oh well, not a big deal. I could get it in Bellingham and combine the day with a trip to the Grizzly showroom. It's about the same drive as going into the Big Smoke that is Greater Vancouver.

I was thinking that cheap hardboard with black board paint would allow us to use chalk. But the oil flecks over time would likely make it a mess. At least the glossy white board material could be washed with a good detergent like Fantastic to clean away any oil.

Dan_the_Chemist
04-29-2017, 06:24 PM
What are some of ways you protect the table of your knee mill? This short video shows how I have been doing it for decades. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sJSwRMEhH1o

Another YouTube content provider. I've subscribed.

Viperspit
04-29-2017, 07:38 PM
Another YouTube content provider. I've subscribed.

Thanks Dan,

Hopefully tomorrow We will have another video on surface grinding thin stock flat using paper towels. We already filmed the video we just need to edit and upload it. This YouTube thing is new to us we hope to get better with practice. It still feels strange talking to a camera.

Steve

J Tiers
04-29-2017, 07:49 PM
..... It still feels strange talking to a camera.

Steve

You are not talking to it, you are talking THROUGH it. Just like giving a sales presentation, except that the audience is standing on the other side of the camera.

Mike Amick
04-29-2017, 08:49 PM
Hi Viperspit ...

Like your vids .. but .. I do have a suggestion.

I notice a LOT of your vids are like 15min long. Nothing wrong with that, but it feels like you are stretching
some vids out to get to this length.

This ways cover vid for instance, great info !!! but you could have made a well paced vid that was only 5 min
covering most everything you did.

Absolutely nothing wrong with vids that are only 5 min long. Maybe try it.

Viperspit
04-29-2017, 09:06 PM
Hi Viperspit ...

Like your vids .. but .. I do have a suggestion.

I notice a LOT of your vids are like 15min long. Nothing wrong with that, but it feels like you are stretching
some vids out to get to this length.

This ways cover vid for instance, great info !!! but you could have made a well paced vid that was only 5 min
covering most everything you did.

Absolutely nothing wrong with vids that are only 5 min long. Maybe try it.

Hi Mike,

Thanks for the advice. We are new at this an trying to get the hang of it. I know it will be hard to please everyone. Some will want less information and some will want more. Some will want beginner topics and some will want more advance topics. We hope to find a balance that most will be satisfied with that is why I appreciate the feedback. Thanks for watching.

Steve

Dan_the_Chemist
04-29-2017, 09:18 PM
Hopefully tomorrow We will have another video on surface grinding thin stock flat using paper towels.

Great. I can't afford a surface grinder but I have paper towels. I look forward to learning how to use them to grind stock flat !!!

What? Oh?

Nevermind...

https://i.ytimg.com/vi/OjYoNL4g5Vg/maxresdefault.jpg

Video Man
04-30-2017, 12:21 AM
Mike A. has a good point. Before my retirement, I was a video producer for the website of a major newspaper. We found that the attention span of people on web videos is very brief. You have to get their attention in the first 20 seconds and anything longer than 3-4 minutes total will finding people clicking off your work early. Some ideas from experience: Plan your shots, plan your narration. Be concise. Edit out bobbles, long pauses, and needless repetition. Titles if any should be very brief (I've seen Youtube pieces with 45 second intros that added nothing to the content). You aren't talking to the camera, you are talking to an unseen observer in your shop, so to speak. Good audio is 70% of a good video. Good lighting is a given. A variety of shots (wide, medium, close-up) keeps the pace going. Best wishes!

BCRider
04-30-2017, 02:28 AM
Pacing and length of videos is a key factor in keeping subscribers.

Examples of EXCELLENT videos for pacing and content and providing clear yet concise methods and explanations are Clickspring, This Old Tony, and the early Keith Fenner "Turn Wright Machine Works" videos. I find Keith's recent video postings are long winded and he no longer uses skips or fast forward for the actual machining. And as a result I skip through to try to find the gems among the filler where before I'd watch the whole video in real time.

Examples like Tubalcain "Mr Pete 222" are mostly well paced and highly informative and the odd digression to some old story quite entertaining. But even he has a miss now and then. On the other hand I simply can't watch any of the Randy Richards videos without skipping through them as he's incredibly long winded about stuff not related to the topic or explains and repeats information in infinite detail well past the point of needlessness. A shame too as the projects are wonderfully done. So his videos, when I do watch them, are skipped through to where I only watch about 1/4 of the material. And that's still enough for the full picture.

Don't be afraid to show the actual machining. But do speed it up. Cut back to real time for the explanations and I'd say keep them short. Sure, beginners do need more. But do that by giving them less in the form of smaller bites of the material so you can keep the talking about the smaller "portion" short. And then do multiple videos to put it all together rather than one longer one that goes on and on.

At least that's how I feel about them.

Mr Fixit
04-30-2017, 03:21 AM
Hi group,

I had some 16ga Aluminum that I have bent a 1" angle on each side of two pieces so that it holds them (not quite a snug fit) on the table, and are as long as the table on each side of the vise in the middle of the table. I do use it for writing on with a sharpe, then a little break cleaner it's as good as new.
Just wanted to give another idea.

TX
Mr fixit for the family
Chris :)

Viperspit
04-30-2017, 05:06 AM
Hi guys,

Thanks for the advice on making videos. We will take your feedback and put it to use in future videos.

Steve

pinstripe
04-30-2017, 11:07 AM
We found that the attention span of people on web videos is very brief...

Makes sense for news content, but there are many popular YT channels with 30+ minute videos being the norm. I agree that they shouldn't be stretched, but I think long videos are fine if the content is good.



Examples like Tubalcain "Mr Pete 222" are mostly well paced and highly informative and the odd digression to some old story quite entertaining. But even he has a miss now and then. On the other hand I simply can't watch any of the Randy Richards videos without skipping through them as he's incredibly long winded about stuff not related to the topic or explains and repeats information in infinite detail well past the point of needlessness.

Proves you really can't please everyone. I struggle to sit through Mr. Pete, but have no problem with Randy Richard.

BCRider
04-30-2017, 12:41 PM
Different strokes and all that I'd guess. And it certainly explains why different channels all have their subscribers.

MrFixit, sheet aluminium would work like a charm. It didn't leap to my own mind simply because I don't have a shear or brake to cut and bend it....But I've got a nice wood shop. I'd say the best option for any of us comes down to the old story about "if all a fellow has is a hammer then all his tasks start to look like nails....." :)

Dan_the_Chemist
04-30-2017, 03:16 PM
I like the channels where there are different video formats presented as different threads. For example, one provider has a series of tips and tricks that are all fairly short. I love to watch them. The same provider also has a chatty format video series that talks about his emails, stuff he found at flea markets and auctions, and ... I don't know what else. I'm generally asleep by then.

However, that doesn't mean that I don't like long machining videos. I will watch a 30 minute machining video as long as it "moves along". Consider Clickspring... We all know he has hours and hours of draw filing in those parts, but he only shows 1 or 2 minutes at a time. He shows today's task, discusses the problems, and then shows the set up, the jig making, the initial machining, [skip the middle] the last cuts, the result...

Some of the more established content providers are getting a little lazy with their editing. There was a recent 30 minute video that had about 20 minutes of the lathe autofeeding. Blah.

And as far as props go - they don't need to be fancy. One of my favorite props could be bought for a penny. ;)

softtail
04-30-2017, 08:49 PM
The quarterly table protection thread...
http://i171.photobucket.com/albums/u299/mikeschmitt/IMG_6237.jpg (http://s171.photobucket.com/user/mikeschmitt/media/IMG_6237.jpg.html)

Mr Fixit
05-01-2017, 01:25 AM
BC Rider,

With a table saw and a carbide blade you can cut aluminum quite well, just use some wax to lube it before you start. And a bender from wood 2"x4" with a BFH will getter done. If there is a will there is a way. Many a home shop motto!

TX
Mr fixit for the family
Chris :)

BCRider
05-01-2017, 12:16 PM
That's all true. Not as neat a bend as using a proper brake but it would getter done if I needed them to be done in aluminium.

It's just that with the wood shop available and no sheet metal tooling I could do a neater job with wood products than with sheet metal. After all it's not like the covers NEED to be sheet aluminium.

rowbare
05-04-2017, 12:30 PM
Another product they have in the US HD's but not up here. Oh well, not a big deal. I could get it in Bellingham and combine the day with a trip to the Grizzly showroom. It's about the same drive as going into the Big Smoke that is Greater Vancouver.

I was thinking that cheap hardboard with black board paint would allow us to use chalk. But the oil flecks over time would likely make it a mess. At least the glossy white board material could be washed with a good detergent like Fantastic to clean away any oil.

I have bought it at HD in Ottawa. It was in the rack where the cut boards are. They had both white one side masonite and the marker board.

bob

Lew Hartswick
05-04-2017, 01:07 PM
You have to get their attention in the first 20 seconds and anything longer than 3-4 minutes total will finding people clicking off your work early.!
ABSOLUTELY!!! I hardly ever watch a YT because the first several minutes is usually just BSing and that gets OLD in a hurry. IF the subject doesn't get broached in the first 10 or 15 sec. I'm long gone. Haven't watched one of the OP beyond those 10 or 15 sec yet. AND won't either. Applies to all you "would be movie producer/directors"
Not interested in a one sided chat session. :-(
...lew...

Mcgyver
05-04-2017, 03:01 PM
Consider Clickspring... We all know he has hours and hours of draw filing in those parts, but he only shows 1 or 2 minutes at a time. He shows today's task, discusses the problems, and then shows the set up, the jig making, the initial machining, [skip the middle] the last cuts, the result...


yeah, but he's the Rolling Stones of machining videos.......i don't know that anyone would have an issue with their length.

If you think about what makes them so great, imo its basics like everything is planned and thought out. Script, cinematography, editing etc. Certainly there is a lot of skill and work. It would be interesting to know how many hours he puts into it for 1 hour of output. I bet its magnitudes above the average....and that imo is the big factor

I've never thought of what we do as 'art', more a craft. I can write down a set of instructions anyone could follow, even a beginner, if I did it in enough detail. The results would be perfect (if done in enough detail) I couldn't do the same to paint a painting or compose a symphony./...at least not one that would ever be considered even good let alone perfect. I see things somewhat the same with these videos .... there is some artistic talent perhaps not needed in making a part, however most people would end up with amazing videos if they put into them the sort of effort Chris does.

thaiguzzi
05-05-2017, 04:57 AM
Back on topic, re the title of this thread.
I can be a bit OCD in the things i do in my workshop, and my workshop organisation and machine tool accessories.
But a protective cover for my mill table has never been on my agenda. And after reading this thread, still is'nt...

Danl
05-05-2017, 12:09 PM
Back on topic, re the title of this thread.
I can be a bit OCD in the things i do in my workshop, and my workshop organisation and machine tool accessories.
But a protective cover for my mill table has never been on my agenda. And after reading this thread, still is'nt...

I agree 100% with this. Even if I had tons of excess time on my hands this one would never rise to the top of my project list.

Dan

softtail
05-05-2017, 01:27 PM
Easy cleaning, can throw stuff on top without harming table. Cheap and quick to protect something expensive. To each his own.. carry on.

jhe.1973
05-10-2017, 08:21 PM
Didn't see anyone suggest this:

http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/attachment.php?attachmentid=1187&d=1494461644

Ribbed vinyl carpet runner. Came across it at Home Depot over 6 years ago & its still wearing well. Came on a 27 inch wide X 6 foot long roll. I do a lot of smaller stuff and the ribs keep center drills, drills, reamers, taps, endmills etc. organized while performing multiple operations. By the time the chips hit the surface they seldom stick. Found that cutting oils will get them wavy after a few days if I don't wipe them off.

I think this might be the same stuff:

http://www.homedepot.com/p/Sterling-Brands-Wide-Rib-Black-27-in-W-x-72-in-Exact-Length-Vinyl-Rug-Runner-6320024/205847360

754
05-10-2017, 09:59 PM
DISREGARD IF YOU DO NOT RECYCLE COOLANT THRU SUMP
I have never had any good come out of getting woodfibre, chips or other organic matter into the sump.
I avoid at all cost.
KBC has a nice plastic tray with bumps that go in the Tslot, chips can stick. They also have perforated alloy extrusions to fit in the slots.
If no brake cut your alloy cover with 3 inch tab in each corner, bend in vise.