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Chuckalac
05-27-2017, 11:51 AM
Hi I am new here and I am a very amateur machinist I have bought a South Bend model CL8187A Precision lathe. Ser# 12112RKL 16. It was only used by one man who died about 30 yrs ago and it has just sat there gathering dust and surface rust. The old boy used to do very precise work for the Milliken Textile Corp Engineering and research division.
The ways except for a few dings at the headstock under the chuck are impeccable. When you roll a wheel the feel is just beautiful. The lathe has the Taper turn attachment and about 250 lbs of attachments like 4 6 jaw chucks besides a 4 jaw independent and 3 jaw self centering, and other tooling. It also has 2 full sets of collets and drawbars etc. Its on a steel bench that came with it.
I think I may understand the serial # but that 16 at the end is beyond me and am I right to place the lathe in the 60"s. It stood for about 30 yrs.
I am in the process of scotch briting the jewel and when I get done I will put out in the sun to get warm so it will dry, and pressure wash all the painted surfaces. I like red wheels with black upper on the saddle and compound slide. Does anybody know what the shade of grey was that Southbend used.
I appreciate any help Chuck

Dan_the_Chemist
05-27-2017, 12:34 PM
Pictures are good !

JCHannum
05-27-2017, 12:44 PM
Welcome to the forum. I don't know what you have other than what sounds like a very nice South Bend, but do not pressure wash it.

LKeithR
05-27-2017, 12:44 PM
I would be very careful with the Scotchbrite--even the finest grit will remove some material from the ways. If
you want to remove rust use some fine steel wool. Requires a bit more elbow grease but it will do less damage
to the machine. I'm also not a fan of pressure washing an assembled machine--you'll drive water into every nook
and cranny on the lathe...

Mr Fixit
05-27-2017, 12:48 PM
Hi and Welcome Chuck,

If you can put your general location IE; Country, State, Providence, or a minor detail It can help people answer your questions sometimes. Besides we all aren't going to come visit, at least not all at once. We do respect privacy.

I would be very careful pressure washing this machine. You can push water into areas that will not dry well or completely, this could cause you problems unless you dismantle it for this process. I restored a South Bend 9A completely dismantling it and I used Rustolium Machine gray and it looks very close to what my machine had on it. You can always go to a paint store and with a original part they will match the color and can mix you paint to match. Some paint stores even have custom fillable spray paint cans.
www.wswells.com has a very good site for information. South Bend is now owned by Grizzly tools so maybe you can contact them, I don't know if they have records or not, but it might be worth a try.

Keep us updated as you progress on the machine. Pic's are always welcome. We would love to see what you describe as almost a NOS machine.

TX
Mr fixit for the family
Chris :)

RB211
05-27-2017, 12:48 PM
Sounds like you're trying to destroy a nice lathe...

Doozer
05-27-2017, 12:58 PM
Sounds like you're trying to destroy a nice lathe...


Yep!


-D

flylo
05-27-2017, 02:31 PM
Grizzly will sell you the info for $25. Many people think Ford Gray tractor paint from TSC matched very close. The 16 may indicate the taper attachment just a guess. Welcome to the forum :o

JoeFin
05-27-2017, 03:25 PM
Rule #1

When bragging about "New to You" machines - if you ain't got pictures it never happened

754
05-27-2017, 03:35 PM
Sounds very nice a well tooled, would like to see the accessories.
If its flat belt drive, probably older than you think.
Is the reverser to lead screw a knurled knob, or square head bolt ?

Chuckalac
05-27-2017, 03:46 PM
Thanks for the info on pressure washing. I did not have to rub hard to get the surface rust off the ways. As to what it looks like its exactly like the machine that is on the factory bench with the open space tween the legs. The headstock end has all the drive and there is nothing in the tailstock end. Probably put a coolant tank there.I live in the piedmont of the great state of South Carolina USA. I will just mean green and hand rub the machine clean then.
I know of a machine shop where they use bubbling air just like in a fishtank in the coolant tanks and the soluable oil stuff does not stink. Any of you guys do that?
It seems the taper attatchment is a bolt on accessory so I would not think they would have put it in the ser no. It would be nice to know what the 16 signifys but I am not going to pay for that. This lathe is a big step up ftom my 80 yr old Sears 10X36 The traverse is too fast to get a good finish and it does chatter a little
I do not consider myself in the 0.0001" class machinists and If I get 0.001" tolerance I am extatic. I saw a piece of shaft that was turned on the lathe and the finish just blows my mind Chuck

754
05-27-2017, 03:53 PM
Does it have a quick change box, or change gears ? What about the reverser and the drive belts?
Motor behind spindle, or in cabinet ?

Chuckalac
05-27-2017, 03:58 PM
Mr 754 I will look next time what reverses the lead screw/traverse bar. It has a keyway up the length of the lead screw when I go out to where it is being stored till I get my house built.
Yes its a flat belt, Orange I think and the cabinets are flat not rounded on the bottom
Chuck

Chuckalac
05-27-2017, 04:12 PM
It changes gears with the shifters on the bottom side of the headstock and the motor is down in the cabinet.
Really if it was not for the open final belt and the exposed spindle bearings it would not look so old. It also has the feed lever on the tailstock as well as the handwheel. I think the multiple 6 jaw chucks is that maybe they are each trued to different diameters of shaft. There is a whole box of thingys including tool posts etc. That 16 is prominently stamped on the way at the serial no so it must have significance. I will be honest I think I have got hold to a very good machine that is waay beyond my feeble abilities. I am however gentle with machines so its in good hands. It will suffer benevolent neglect a little as I am not a fanatic I am just a tinkerer. My passion is rifles and reloading for extreme long distance musketry
Chuck

JoeLee
05-27-2017, 04:49 PM
Scotch Brite and pressure washing ????? No way.............

JL...............

tom_d
05-27-2017, 05:32 PM
That should be the South Bend "Heavy Ten" tool room lathe. Based on this site I'm going to guess the lathe was built around 1960: http://www.wswells.com/serial_number.html
If it has been sitting for many years the best thing is to clean the dust and dirt off, and then do a thorough lubrication. This will include a check of the oil cups and wicks that feed oil to the spindle bearings. You definitely do not want to run that machine with dry bearings. There are kits available on ebay to replace the wicks that include instructions Clean it. Lube it. Enjoy using it. Link to rebuild kit: http://www.ebay.com/itm/South-Bend-Lathe-Heavy-10-Rebuild-Parts-Kit-Model-10L-10R-/160636821718?hash=item2566b360d6:g:WKAAAOSwHoFXq9j P

Please post photos!

Glug
05-27-2017, 06:20 PM
Thanks for the info on pressure washing. I did not have to rub hard to get the surface rust off the ways. ...
I will just mean green and hand rub the machine clean then.
I know of a machine shop where they use bubbling air just like in a fishtank in the coolant tanks and the soluable oil stuff does not stink. Any of you guys do that?


You might want to slow down before rushing into more mistakes. Spend some serious time reading about machine restoration. And also lubrication and care and feeding of old south bend's. The goal should be to first Do No Harm. Scotch Brite was harm. it really has no place in this process.
"Green" type caustics get drawn into the seams and can cause corrosion. Oil is a fairly safe cleaner.
Do some reading about soluble "oil". It is hard on lathes. You aren't running a production shop, right?

J Tiers
05-27-2017, 10:30 PM
Pressure washing is bad, water gets in and causes rust in tight places.

Scotchbrite? I'd use wet-or-dry sandpaper with light oil, myself. Probably 400 or 600 grit, by hand. Scotchbrite drops too much grit.

As for people freaking out about removing material from "precision surfaces"..... They are way overthinking the matter.

1) The rust has already altered the surface. Not much, but it has.

2) I recommend that those folks who are freaking out should try to reduce a 1" x 1" surface by two tenths of a thou with 400 grit paper. After they spend a half hour or so on it, they will begin to understand. It takes a LONG time to take a surface down with sandpaper... Removing rust will not take 1% of that time. Worrying about it is just silly.

kitno455
05-28-2017, 09:33 AM
Does it have a quick change box, or change gears ? What about the reverser and the drive belts?
Motor behind spindle, or in cabinet ?

It is a SB Heavy 10 from 1960. It has a wide ratio double tumbler gearbox, under motor drive, and the reverser has a proper spring loaded lever.

The original paint color varied over the years, but it has more aqua in it than any tractor paint. I decided not to worry about it, and painted mine MF gray.

There is more info (and some paint color formulations) at http://www.practicalmachinist.com/vb/south-bend-lathes/

Here's a post with a paint color from sherwin williams: http://www.practicalmachinist.com/vb/south-bend-lathes/south-bend-paint-color-update-236397-post1705216/#post1705216

allan

Dan_the_Chemist
05-28-2017, 02:38 PM
Scotch Brite and pressure washing ????? No way.............

JL...............

Yeah... I find angle grinding and sand blasting to be much quicker.

:p