PDA

View Full Version : Carbide Tipped Recip. Saw Blades, Anybody Using Them?



Willy
06-06-2017, 11:22 PM
Often times I find myself needing to either cut some stock out away from the shop or just finding it necessary to cut metal without the luxury of a cutting torch or a plasma cutter. To this end I have been contemplating the purchase of reciprocating saw and equipping it with some of the Diablo carbide tipped metal cutting blades.
A short video below that describes the blades in question.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8AleTFRITmE

My bandsaw is used a lot in the shop but it isn't very handy for overhead use or outside. LOL
The torch and plasma cutter while handy are also not that portable and in addition causes me concerns as a fire hazard in many situations.
The fact that the reciprocating saw will be used for other purposes is an additional bonus.

I'd be pleased to hear what the experience of others is in the use of these blades with a reciprocating saw and if they represent good metal cutting value. Also how do they stack up against a more conventional bi-metal saw when used in metal?
Faster cuts/longer life?

Thanks in advance for your opinions, they mean a lot more to me than ad hype.:)

boslab
06-06-2017, 11:36 PM
I bought a packet of 5 for use in a recip saw after I lost my hydraulic rebar cutter, I was and still am cutting 16mm rebar (a new hydraulic cutter bender is 1500 plus) the first recip died fairly quick as it was a cheap one, replaced it with a makita which didn't last long, returned it and got a Milwaukee cordless with a couple of 5A batteries, I've been using it since, not just rebar, box section, scaffolding tube, even took it to a chromed rod, no problem, I'm on my second blade, I have a feeling I could resharpen the carbide, I sawed through a brick wall with no 1, they work well
Mark

deltaenterprizes
06-06-2017, 11:45 PM
The one I have worked well on some mild steel flat bar and pipe from an old patio table I cut up.

Mike279
06-07-2017, 07:05 AM
I had to cut a 4 inch cast Iron soil pipe that was close to the wall like most are. I used a recip with a new carbide tipped Diablo blade and it cut much quicker than a new bimetal blade. I have to say I have become a fan.

Mike

Dunc
06-07-2017, 09:57 AM
Also bought Diablo but only the wood blade designed to cut embedded nails. Works as advertised! Local big box sells a version for metal cutting (more tpi?). Will get some next time around

Willy
06-07-2017, 02:52 PM
Thanks for the replies, looks like I'll be dusting off a new spot on the bench this weekend for a new tool.
A cord isn't a deal breaker, although cordless would be nice but hard to justify given the limited amount of use that it will get....we'll see.

Any recommendations as what not to buy?

Black Forest
06-07-2017, 03:52 PM
Thanks for the replies, looks like I'll be dusting off a new spot on the bench this weekend for a new tool.
A cord isn't a deal breaker, although cordless would be nice but hard to justify given the limited amount of use that it will get....we'll see.

Any recommendations as what not to buy?

Mr. Willy, you had to do it didn't you. Post about a tool I didn't have. So I ordered one of these blades today and will have a go with it. If it is not good then I am sending you a bill!

Yondering
06-07-2017, 04:08 PM
A tip for extending blade life with these reciprocating saws in steel - use a hose to flush the cut with water while cutting. It seems like an odd thing to do at first, as water isn't a cutting oil, but it actually works very well to keep the blade cool and flush away chips that otherwise get re-cut or clog the blade.
If you aren't in an area with a hose, having a partner pour water from a bucket works almost as well.

Willy
06-07-2017, 09:46 PM
Mr. Willy, you had to do it didn't you. Post about a tool I didn't have. So I ordered one of these blades today and will have a go with it. If it is not good then I am sending you a bill!

Not so fast Black Forest, I don't even have the tool the blade goes into. So me being more under-privileged than you by having done without for so long, I should be the one sending you the bill for the new Sawzall, especially if it works and I want to keep it.:)

But yes the Diablo blade does look like it would be useful for thicker gauge and harder metals than a regular bi-metal blade might have trouble with.
As a side note I talked to a an emergency first responder the other day who said that they now carry a couple of cordless reciprocating saws equipped with the Diablo blades. He claimed that some of the new protective passenger compartment structures on certain cars were made from high strength boron alloy steels that were a challenge to their jaws of life equipment. Apparently the carbide tipped blades are able to cut thru this no problem, we'll see.

If you like I can PM you a copy of the bill on the weekend, maybe I can justify that 60V cordless unit after all.:cool:

George Seal
06-07-2017, 10:26 PM
Mark
Keith Fenner has a new video using Dewalt cut off blades in a side grinder

engineerd3d
06-08-2017, 12:29 AM
Having owned a HF 20$ reciprocate saw, a Milwaukee corded and now a Milwaukee cordless. I have to say the HF saw is not bad at all for occasional work. Milwaukee corded is an absolute beast but heavy as heck. The cordless I currently have is the older model v28 cordless. Heavy as heck add a battery and you feel like you got a sledgehammer in your hands, from personal experience is if you plan on putting miles. Milwaukee is the way to go. HF is second for me due to weight and still delivers a good punch. I also dealt with a DeWalt years back in the early 2000's and that thing was crap. Not sure how they are now. Look for a saw that has a easy locking mechanism. Stay away from complexity.

gellfex
06-09-2017, 12:09 PM
I've used carbide for demo of old plaster that has lots of aggregate. They do wear out but not as fast as bimetal. Have never had a problem with bimetal for 2" steel pipe and such. Current saw is an 18v Makita, just awesome power. I'm very happy with the Makita cordless line, latest is an oscillating saw. Now a carbide blade for that would be useful, I toast them all the time and sharpen them with a Dremel.

Willy
06-09-2017, 01:16 PM
Good to hear the endorsement of the Makita as I've been leaning that way. I'm thinking that while the oscillation feature would be beneficial for wood it probably wouldn't be that desirable in metal, especially with carbide?
Nice to see that with a little care the carbide can be touched up.

gellfex
06-09-2017, 02:00 PM
Good to hear the endorsement of the Makita as I've been leaning that way. I'm thinking that while the oscillation feature would be beneficial for wood it probably wouldn't be that desirable in metal, especially with carbide?
Nice to see that with a little care the carbide can be touched up.

I'm afraid I didn't make myself clear, I mentioned 2 tools, the reciprocating saw with the carbide, and the oscillating saw/tool like the Fein. It's the HSS oscillating blades I sharpen. I suppose I could try to do the carbide ones with a diamond file or a green stone wheel, but it didn't seem worth the time. They get pretty rounded off!

danlb
06-09-2017, 02:27 PM
I'm afraid I didn't make myself clear, I mentioned 2 tools, the reciprocating saw with the carbide, and the oscillating saw/tool like the Fein.

May I mention a third one?

The portaband style handheld bandsaws are really great to have. They can make a pretty clean cut anywhere that you have power. I went cheap and picked up the Harbor Freight version for $50 on sale 10 years ago. It was great to use before I bought my 4x6 bandsaw. The largest I've cut was 3 inch steel. I still use it now and then.

I use the Sawsall with Diablo blades most often for demolition of "things". Flooring, 20 year old back projection wide screen, a porch, fence, etc.

Dan

Willy
06-09-2017, 04:03 PM
The reason I mentioned the oscillation feature was that I have noticed that several manufactures of reciprocating saws now have a setting that allows one to choose to use the strictly back and forth conventional cutting action or choose an oscillating motion. I wood suspect the oscillating setting would be solely for more aggressive cutting in wood and would not be welcome for cutting metal for various reasons. Nice feature if you're a wood butcher I suppose.:)

My main focus for this saw is metal cutting outside of the shop with the added bonus of being able to cut wood. Probably the opposite of what most use them for.

I was under the impression that the Diablo carbide tipped blades for metal that I linked a short video to in my opening post were a relatively new development and for use on thicker metal. 3/16"-1/2"
These are of course a much different blade than the bi-metal Diablo Steel Demon blades. Just wondering if they were as effective as the numerous videos claim them to be?


http://www.renovation-headquarters.com/images/Diablo_Steel_Demon.jpg

gellfex
06-09-2017, 10:56 PM
The reason I mentioned the oscillation feature was that I have noticed that several manufactures of reciprocating saws now have a setting that allows one to choose to use the strictly back and forth conventional cutting action or choose an oscillating motion.]

Do you mean the "orbital action" like on a Bosch jigsaw? It seems to me the Makita recip saw has some fixed orbital motion, it cuts very aggressively. A oscillating saw/multitool is one of these:

http://toolguyd.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2016/08/Makita-12V-CXT-Oscillating-Multi-Tool.jpg

Willy
06-09-2017, 11:33 PM
Do you mean the "orbital action"

Orbital action would be the correct term. Don't really need this for it's intended primary role. But hey I like to keep my options open so if the reciprocating saw I purchase has that as a selectable feature I won't kick.I see a number of recip. saws are no available with this feature.
Who knows I may need it in the future if I tear some of the older out buildings down later.

But yes not an oscillating multi-tool, I have one of those.

gellfex
06-09-2017, 11:56 PM
FWIW even without an adjustable orbital action, the Makita is plenty aggressive in the interior demo i've done. My home has high aggregate plaster on expanded metal mesh, ca 1950. The stuff is nearly an inch thick and is more like cement than plaster, it may even be a portland rather than plaster product. The saw will happily rip through 2 layers and the long way of a dimensional 2X4 taking out a wall.