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suomi
08-07-2004, 11:32 PM
I have a stark lathe marked 4.5 stark lathe waltham mass. it is not like the ones pictured on the U.K. site. It has a planitary motor driving a variable belt drive with a in out clutch the drive is in a built in enclosure behind the lathe, the lathe is a bench top unit looks simaliar to the lathe at the begining to the practical machinists site. The lathe seems to take a odd collet marked stark. I am in need of a chuck and a cross slide assembly. anyone ever run into one of these lathes? or if I can't find the parts anyone need one?

Bob-O
08-08-2004, 06:05 PM
I've got some old compounds gathering dust on a shelf. E-mail me off line, maybe I can help you out.
Regards,
Bob

Joe H
08-09-2004, 05:33 PM
Suomi,
I have copies of old catalogues showing the old flat belt #4-1/2 Stark Bench Lathe. I would expect the newer enclosed head version has similar specs. They were 9" swing so you should be able to use any compound from a 9" swing bench lathe. Stark, Cataract/Hardinge, Elgin etc. The standard collet for this machine was a 42S. Max capacity 1" Round. All Stark machines have 10P nose spindles and the tailstocks have special tapers (all 1-1/2 deg). If you need specs email and I'll sen you a PDF File.
Joe

suomi
08-09-2004, 06:34 PM
Thanks bob and Joe for the replys. As far as tooling off of other 9 inch lathes fitting like the cross slide, I know hardinge split bed lathe parts don't fit because I purchased a octagon turret for it and it doesnt fit, the bed is wider than a hardinge but it does look the same by the old eyeball method. what is a 10p spindle thread.
thanks mike

Joe H
08-10-2004, 07:58 AM
Mike,
Each maker had their own split bed design. Hardinge/Cataract and Elgin are the same and are interchangeable. The flat on the Hardinge/Cataract/Elgin is about 2.55" and the side slopes are 60 deg. The flat on the stark #4 & #4-1/2 is about 3" and the side slopes are 55 deg. Compounds are pretty much interchangeable (for the same swing). You can possibly re-machine that turret to fit your stark lathe bed. You need a mill and you will need to read up on methods of measuring dovetails. 10P is 10 threads per inch(for mounting a chuck).

Joe H

NSB
08-10-2004, 02:32 PM
Changing subject slightly. I've also just bought a Stark Model 4 lathe. Mine is pretty complete but needs some de-rusting and re-painting due to being in storage for 20 years.

My question is about the tailstock, attached to the ram, there is a thin metal strip that slides in a slot in the tailstock body. What does this do ?

Joe H
08-10-2004, 03:14 PM
NSB,
Next to the slot the raised area has marks on it. The strip indicates the ram travel.

Joe H

NSB
08-10-2004, 04:08 PM
Thanks,

Hopefully I'll re-discover the markings on mine after I've removed the rust (electrolytically of course).

NSB
08-15-2004, 09:56 AM
Joe H (or anyone else) you may be able to help me some more.

1) As you probably inferred from my previous post, my tailstock had been poorly stored and has become quite rusty. I'm hopefull that it will restore OK but I'm having some problems getting it into component form. Is there a correct (or incorrect) way to get the tailstock ram out. I've undone all the obvious bits, soaked it in oil, but the ram is stuck firm. Before I resort to the Birmingham screwdriver (hammer) I need to be more confident that I won't break something from simple ignorance.

2) I've released the bronze nut (?) / allignment plate that the tailstock ram screw seems to run in (I can't be 100% on functionality until I get it apart). This was held in by one cheese-head screw. There are two more holes in this plate and in the tailstock casting. These don't appear to have been tapped, are they for pins ? (Stark seem to like pins).

3) My lathe has an English style toolpost clamp, which looks original. This is roughly triangular, with a central bolt, two fingers bearing down on the tool, and a knurled adjusting wheel on the third corner. This adjusting screw was clamped onto a plate that I assumed at first to be some some of alignment guide. On closer observation it is actually a stamped metal screwdriver (see poor ascii art below). Is that all it is ? i.e. was it clamped in the toolpost just to keep it handy, or does it serve some other purpose ?

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/ O /
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NSB
08-15-2004, 09:57 AM
Joe H (or anyone else) you may be able to help me some more.

1) As you probably inferred from my previous post, my tailstock had been poorly stored and has become quite rusty. I'm hopefull that it will restore OK but I'm having some problems getting it into component form. Is there a correct (or incorrect) way to get the tailstock ram out. I've undone all the obvious bits, soaked it in oil, but the ram is stuck firm. Before I resort to the Birmingham screwdriver (hammer) I need to be more confident that I won't break something from simple ignorance.

2) I've released the bronze nut (?) / allignment plate that the tailstock ram screw seems to run in (I can't be 100% on functionality until I get it apart). This was held in by one cheese-head screw. There are two more holes in this plate and in the tailstock casting. These don't appear to have been tapped, are they for pins ? (Stark seem to like pins).

3) My lathe has an English style toolpost clamp, which looks original. This is roughly triangular, with a central bolt, two fingers bearing down on the tool, and a knurled adjusting wheel on the third corner. This adjusting screw was clamped onto a plate that I assumed at first to be some some of alignment guide. On closer observation it is actually a stamped metal screwdriver (see poor ascii art below). Is that all it is ? i.e. was it clamped in the toolpost just to keep it handy, or does it serve some other purpose ?

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/ | |
/ /-----------------------
/ O /
\-------------- /

This supposed to look like a finger pointing..

suomi
08-15-2004, 11:01 AM
NSB I went in the basment and poped my tailstock apart. I removed the screw located under the tailstock handle and the two pins next to it then I tapped it out with a wood block from the tool holding end of the ram toward the handle end. Hope this helps.
Mike

Joe H
08-15-2004, 01:52 PM
NSB,
As Mike mentioned removal of the the cheese head screw and two tapered pins should allow you to knock the ram out toward the handle end. Sounds like the pins on yours are missing. Be sure to use a block of wood as Mike did with your "Birmingham Screwdriver". I think I would try some heat and "liquid wrench" on the the area where the bronze nut is sandwiched between the cast iron to possibly release the corrosion before you use your "Screwdriver" since you may be hammering on the threads for the ram. You should easily be able to tell if the ram shaft is frozen to the casting (nothing moves) or the bronze nut is just frozen between the cast iron ears (the ram will move in the tailstock slightly). It sounds like it is totally frozen. I think I would try to use a large gear puller and heat to drive the out ram. It may take some setup since you may have to make a collar to grab the back end of the casting and a plug for the front of the ram, but it should work. Once it moves with the puller be carefull you don't destroy the bronze nut driving it out. Once the ram is out of the tailstock casting, the handle is removed by removing the nut on the end. The handle is on a shaft secured with a small key. The collar behind the handle is threaded (very fine threads). Once the collar is removed everthing is apart. If you email me I'd be happy to send you a PDF file of an orginal Stark catalogue. It shows the toolposts that were offered with these lathes.
Joe H

NSB
08-15-2004, 02:51 PM
Thank you Mike (suomi) and Joe, your posts have been very helpfull.

Yes it appears the two pins on the bronze plate are indeed missing. Down the line when it comes to re-assembly I'll replace them. I have managed to release this plate/nut, but there is only an inch or so travel of ram behind it. The ram remains very firmly in place. I was worried that there was another fixing somewhere I'd missed, but this doesn't seem to be the case.

By "small key" on the (ball) handle, I assume you mean pin. Do you know if this is tapered ? I'd been hoping to leave this in place until I'd removed the ram, simply because it will be easier to work on. If a few more days of soaking in penetrating oil and hiting it with a small rubber dead blow hammer (Birmingham suburbs perhaps...) don't get things moving I'll have to try your gear puller idea. Perhaps heat also.

Thanks again.