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View Full Version : OT: Heat pump clothes dryer. Anyone have one?



Black Forest
08-13-2017, 03:01 PM
Title says most all of it. Anyone have one and do you like it?

Mark Rand
08-13-2017, 03:45 PM
We have one. It works well.Extracts vast amounts of fluff from the clothing...

It's in a garage with no gas supply or drainage and the lack of noticable waste heat, low power consumption and built in, emptiable, water container make it pleasant to use.

It's a Beko DHR 73431W (http://www.beko.co.uk/7kg-tumble-dryer-dhr73431-white)

MattiJ
08-13-2017, 03:52 PM
We have about 4 years old Electrolux and I hate it.

Heat exchanger collects ****load of fluff and dust and is difficult or impossible to clean!
Some later ones have some sort of automatic flushing system for the heat exchanger, no idea how well those work.

ikdor
08-13-2017, 04:50 PM
Don't have one now, but next one will be one. The price difference with a normal one will roughly pay for itself. Not sure if they all have it, but my current one has a proper drain so you don't have to empty the water all the time.
Just get a Miele and be done with it.

Dave P.
08-13-2017, 05:02 PM
I live in the States and have never even heard of that style dryer.
Question....say you throw in 5-6 pair of denim blue jeans, how long
till they are dry?
Dave

MattiJ
08-13-2017, 05:11 PM
I live in the States and have never even heard of that style dryer.
Question....say you throw in 5-6 pair of denim blue jeans, how long
till they are dry?
Dave

Never done that many jeans but if it gives any scale a set of sheets (bedsheet, 2x duvet cover, 4x pillow covers) takes about 2 hours depending how dry you want and how much eco.

ikdor
08-13-2017, 05:16 PM
Energy in the US is too cheap to make them worthwhile ;)
Break even here is 3 to 7 years depending on use but that is at 30ct/kWh

boslab
08-13-2017, 09:03 PM
I have one, whirlpool, it's ok saves having through the wall duct, exchanger isn't too difficult to clean, I just take it outside and hose it, gets the fluf out, fairly common around here, I do wish I had a duvet capable one.
Mark

J Tiers
08-13-2017, 11:13 PM
Never done that many jeans but if it gives any scale a set of sheets (bedsheet, 2x duvet cover, 4x pillow covers) takes about 2 hours depending how dry you want and how much eco.

Sheesh.

That load takes maybe 30 minutes, with our standard gas dryer, including the cool down time. And the heat is not on all the time, by any means.

We use a front load washer (Duet) and that already takes out so much water that many items are nearly dry when they come out. It goes up to something like 1200 rpm on spin. And it uses hardly any water to begin with.

Besides that, the net efficiency considering direct use of heat, vs indirect use of electricity generated using heat, may not be that great, even with the "efficient" heat pump. Plus gas outputs less CO2 per heat unit than coal. Not everything can run on solar or wind....

A heat pump dryer sounds much like a solution in search of a problem.

Now, a vacuum dryer system might make sense, pull a vacuum and pump away the water vapor with a small application of heat to prevent freezing. Might still be not very efficient.

MattiJ
08-13-2017, 11:41 PM
I have one, whirlpool, it's ok saves having through the wall duct, exchanger isn't too difficult to clean, I just take it outside and hose it, gets the fluf out, fairly common around here, I do wish I had a duvet capable one.
Mark

Sounds like you have the "normal" condensing version if you can pull out the heat exchanger.

These heat pump versions have compressor inside just like your fridge and heat exchancher(s) is part of the refrigerant circuit, thus not possible to pull out.

MattiJ
08-13-2017, 11:48 PM
Energy in the US is too cheap to make them worthwhile ;)
Break even here is 3 to 7 years depending on use but that is at 30ct/kWh

About 10cents/kWh over here so saving-wise there is no point. I bought one because it puts out lot less heat to apartment and wont need wall duct. Since that moved to our own house so extra heat or wall ducts wouldn't be such a problem.

boslab
08-14-2017, 02:41 AM
Sounds like you have the "normal" condensing version if you can pull out the heat exchanger.

These heat pump versions have compressor inside just like your fridge and heat exchancher(s) is part of the refrigerant circuit, thus not possible to pull out.
Ohhh, sorry I misunderstood, I've never seen one, I do like the vacuum dryer idea, clever, we used vacuum dessicators in the lab. Very fast way to dry samples of ore and Coke that was out in the rain.
Someone told me resteraunts use them.
Funny story, we had a little tea room with a sink, cooker etc in one plant, one of the guys walked in to find one guy drying his socks in the microwave!, it would explain why food smelled so bad when cooking, the added fragrance of sock sweat.
Microwaves are used to dry a lot of things like plastic granules, I wonder?
Mark

darryl
08-14-2017, 02:51 AM
I've been using my microwave for years to dry socks and underwear. I do actually wash them first-

Black Forest
08-14-2017, 06:53 AM
Sheesh.

That load takes maybe 30 minutes, with our standard gas dryer, including the cool down time. And the heat is not on all the time, by any means.

We use a front load washer (Duet) and that already takes out so much water that many items are nearly dry when they come out. It goes up to something like 1200 rpm on spin. And it uses hardly any water to begin with.

Besides that, the net efficiency considering direct use of heat, vs indirect use of electricity generated using heat, may not be that great, even with the "efficient" heat pump. Plus gas outputs less CO2 per heat unit than coal. Not everything can run on solar or wind....

A heat pump dryer sounds much like a solution in search of a problem.

Now, a vacuum dryer system might make sense, pull a vacuum and pump away the water vapor with a small application of heat to prevent freezing. Might still be not very efficient.

Typical response from you JT. Spouting off without knowing all the facts the same as you did with Fusion. The dryers in question have been popular in Europe for about 13 years. The reason being they do not require an outside vent. Condensing dryers also but they are not as efficient as the heat pump variety.

MattiJ
08-14-2017, 08:12 AM
Single biggest reason probably that evropeans don't have gas around every corner.
In here some of the older apartment buildings have gas but apartment buildings typically have no possibility to vent gas dryer..

lakeside53
08-14-2017, 10:33 AM
You can buy them here $$ though. Same with electric water heaters.

J Tiers
08-14-2017, 10:51 AM
Typical response from you JT. Spouting off without knowing all the facts the same as you did with Fusion. The dryers in question have been popular in Europe for about 13 years. The reason being they do not require an outside vent. Condensing dryers also but they are not as efficient as the heat pump variety.

Nice and polite answer, with your usual flair for the obnoxious extra comment. It costs nothing to avoid doing that, you know.

Many things are popular.... that does not necessarily make them best.

You could have simply said the advantage is no vent.... Of course, most apartments here have provision for a vent, or there is an available place for washing clothes, either a shared washer and dryer, or a local coin operated laundromat. All those I have lived in have had that, often both available. So the issue does not come up so much. I have never seen such a thing as that dryer offered for sale here, although I am sure someone has them for sale at a very high price.

However, it is a FACT that the quoted drying time seems very long compared to direct heating. Perhaps 3 to 4 times longer. You seem to be suggesting that Mattij is telling lies about the time. YOU may think that he is, but I do not, he seems quite honest and straightforward to me.

MattiJ
08-14-2017, 11:20 AM
Ladies and Gentlemen: don't get too excited.

J Tiers
08-14-2017, 12:04 PM
Ladies and Gentlemen: don't get too excited.

No worries, it's just BF in top form.

I can see the point of the dryer if there is no vent. The hot end dries the clothes, the cold end condenses the water. That ends up just circulating the energy, so it could be more efficient than it seemed, what heat you take from the water, you put back into the air to evaporate more water, which brings that heat energy back to the cold end for re-circulation.

Still, it evidently is quite a but slower. I guess you have to pay for the convenience somehow.

Black Forest
08-14-2017, 02:09 PM
Nice and polite answer, with your usual flair for the obnoxious extra comment. It costs nothing to avoid doing that, you know.

Many things are popular.... that does not necessarily make them best.

You could have simply said the advantage is no vent.... Of course, most apartments here have provision for a vent, or there is an available place for washing clothes, either a shared washer and dryer, or a local coin operated laundromat. All those I have lived in have had that, often both available. So the issue does not come up so much. I have never seen such a thing as that dryer offered for sale here, although I am sure someone has them for sale at a very high price.

However, it is a FACT that the quoted drying time seems very long compared to direct heating. Perhaps 3 to 4 times longer. You seem to be suggesting that Mattij is telling lies about the time. YOU may think that he is, but I do not, he seems quite honest and straightforward to me.

I never mentioned anything about the time it takes to dry clothes. I only asked if anyone had one. Pretty simple question and it was answered. The world is much bigger than your little town in Missouri and many things are different.