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garyhlucas
09-01-2017, 10:43 PM
My daughter brought my 13 year old grandson down to my job this week. I had been promising I'd show him how to weld. I started with Tig on mild steel. I welded two pieces of scrap together so he could the technique. Then he tried with me giving instructions as he welded. He did a very nice job, I was impressed, and told him he had good hand eye coordination. He said "You know pop I can juggle three balls". Maybe that is good training for a welder.

He tried stick welding too. All I had was some 1/8" 7018. That can be hard to start, and the rod is getting shorter the whole time you are trying to hold a consistent arc distance. He still managed to get the pieces welded together. I'd bet if he burned a 50 lb can of rod he'd be pretty good at it.

I was most impressed when he said the shop wasn't properly organized and then proceeded to tell me what we should change. He was right too, I wish the shop guys could see it!

He is starting High School in a STEM program. Maybe we have the makings of an engineer.

J Tiers
09-01-2017, 11:26 PM
.... Maybe we have the makings of an engineer.

if he keeps on like that he may be a good one.

For some things, a highly theoretical engineer is wanted. But algorithms for bringing a booster back to land on the pad are not wanted that often. More engineers are needed who can solve less arcane problems, and can do designs that are manufacturable.

Engineers with shop experience are needed, although, to be perfectly honest, they are also often not appreciated these days. You just have to realize that a lot of folks really hate reality, and actually making things is so far from their thoughts that they can't stand it when reality clashes with their ideas.

The old sequence of cartoons showing the tire swing as wanted, and then the intermediate and final designs, is all too true.

https://www.google.com/search?q=tire+swing+cartoon&tbm=isch&imgil=4kQN-yzcv3p9GM%253A%253BBZJ7GTfs_A60aM%253Bhttp%25253A% 25252F%25252Fknowyourmeme.com%25252Fmemes%25252Ftr ee-swing-cartoon-parodies&source=iu&pf=m&fir=4kQN-yzcv3p9GM%253A%252CBZJ7GTfs_A60aM%252C_&usg=__N5jIFiMcsQVO0HANlzAhuTsao7w%3D&biw=1920&bih=1087&ved=0ahUKEwjO_qXlxoXWAhVDhlQKHUsaCM0QyjcIQw&ei=lCSqWc7kGMOM0gLLtKDoDA#imgrc=4kQN-yzcv3p9GM:

Black Forest
09-02-2017, 02:40 AM
if he keeps on like that he may be a good one.

For some things, a highly theoretical engineer is wanted. But algorithms for bringing a booster back to land on the pad are not wanted that often. More engineers are needed who can solve less arcane problems, and can do designs that are manufacturable.

Engineers with shop experience are needed, although, to be perfectly honest, they are also often not appreciated these days. You just have to realize that a lot of folks really hate reality, and actually making things is so far from their thoughts that they can't stand it when reality clashes with their ideas.

The old sequence of cartoons showing the tire swing as wanted, and then the intermediate and final designs, is all too true.

https://www.google.com/search?q=tire+swing+cartoon&tbm=isch&imgil=4kQN-yzcv3p9GM%253A%253BBZJ7GTfs_A60aM%253Bhttp%25253A% 25252F%25252Fknowyourmeme.com%25252Fmemes%25252Ftr ee-swing-cartoon-parodies&source=iu&pf=m&fir=4kQN-yzcv3p9GM%253A%252CBZJ7GTfs_A60aM%252C_&usg=__N5jIFiMcsQVO0HANlzAhuTsao7w%3D&biw=1920&bih=1087&ved=0ahUKEwjO_qXlxoXWAhVDhlQKHUsaCM0QyjcIQw&ei=lCSqWc7kGMOM0gLLtKDoDA#imgrc=4kQN-yzcv3p9GM:

I had that cartoon hanging on the wall in the office where my engineers worked designing equipment. When a new engineer came for an job interview I pointed to the big poster of the cartoon and told them to have a good look at it.

wombat2go
09-02-2017, 09:54 AM
This year my 12 yo did a summer camp organised by local non-profit at Kettering U.
The couse was 1.5 hrs of stem followed by 1.5 hours of basketball training.
There was a competition for an invention.
"Our" team won the competition.

Their entry was a lower cost battery powered baseball thrower for fielding training.
They will receive a micro grant and some access to a shop with 3d printing.
So we had to invent the thrower. ( We are doing a ping pong thrower first)

I had the boys in the shop for 3 sessions.
Immediately apparent is that there is no knowledge at all of hand tools or how to use them.
So I went through screwdriver, ratchet wrench, pistol drill, square, hand saw etc.

Another observation is that they don't have manual dexterity. (fine motor skills I think they call it)
Holding and operating a ratchet socket wrench was difficult for one boy,
until he got the idea.

At this stage we have a very simple prototype 12 Volt thrower,that can throw ping pong balls about 40 ft horizontally.
I was pleased that we got a result they could identify with.

flylo
09-02-2017, 03:56 PM
Gary, he's welcome to spend the summer here, plenty of room & I need a helper that thinks!

krutch
09-03-2017, 04:01 PM
You are lucky! That he has interest is a good start. Teach `em young so they can take advantage of youth and be ahead of others his age. I wished I had started twenty years earlier than I did.

Dan_the_Chemist
09-03-2017, 05:19 PM
[QUOTE=J Tiers;1133333 Engineers with shop experience are needed, although, to be perfectly honest, they are also often not appreciated these days. [/QUOTE]

My long and weird career benefited greatly from being able to do a few things in the shop. My first research work involved high vacuums in stainless vessels and there were only a limited number of off-the-shelf products for us to use. We had to make a lot of parts ourselves. This came in handy later when I was a student working for a guy who was sticking electrodes in excised nerves from sea slugs, and they found out I could modify the micromanipulators and microscope stages. Oddly, it worked out very well when a cute young female student was sent to me from the biology department to ask for a modification to the gizmo they used to do surgery on fruit flies. Machine shop led to restaurant led to ... wonderful things. Later, while I was a civilian employee for <branch of military> at <big place> I not only designed the experiments, I also got to make some of the apparatus used to do stuff. It's VERY satisfying to be involved in a project from concept to design to construction to experiment to data analysis.

So this is one reason I encourage young people to learn "top to bottom". Even if their hands aren't on the mill (or CNC machine nowadays), they will have a richer enjoyment of the process if they have an understanding of all the steps.