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Bob La Londe
12-03-2017, 01:05 PM
Alright. Why isn't this a commercial product? Maybe it is and I just didn't see it.

Usually you see guys on YouTube video justifying the value of their Harbor Freight (or other brand of nibbler) by cutting sheets held floppily in the air or off the floor. That seemed to me that unless you are particularly well coordinated or had a lot of practice to be a "rough" operation. Now I'm pretty good with a table. I can do carving with one if I have to. I think that's partly because I can have two hands on the work piece if need be, but also because the work is fully supported. Why not with a nibbler?

Ideally the punching action should be reverse for a table mounted unit, but if its made height adjustable I see no reason it wouldn't work with the current range of power nibblers on the market.

I'm going to make one. Small 8x12 table for now. Probably with a heavy angle on one edge to mount in a vise, but if it works out well I have considered making a table as a leaf attachment for my table saw to support even large stock. (Warning! Wood working content.) I already have a leaf extension for my one of my routers that works out better than a small router table or even a small shaper table.

The only other thing I can think of to make it easier to use and manipulate would be a foot valve for air or a foot switch for electric.

I would note that this is not an original idea. I have seen atleast one home made nibbler table on YouTube. I thought of it, but I was definitely not the first to do so.

Doc Nickel
12-03-2017, 01:49 PM
Why not just pick up a small but sturdy die-filer, fix the table so it no longer pivots, and replace the file with a nibbler punch and die?

It'd likely be a bit slower than you're looking for, but most of the fab work is already done for you.

Doc.

reggie_obe
12-03-2017, 02:00 PM
Why not just pick up a small but sturdy die-filer, fix the table so it no longer pivots, and replace the file with a nibbler punch and die?

It'd likely be a bit slower than you're looking for, but most of the fab work is already done for you.

Doc.

Or a jig-saw, see many at garage sales, showing sign of little use.

drmico60
12-03-2017, 03:28 PM
Hi Bob,
Here is my version of a nibbler table, see:
http://mikesworkshop.weebly.com/a-nibbler-table.html
I have been using it for some time and it works well, especially for fine intricate work.
When I get time I intend to make another nibbler tool which is rather like a jig saw but with a nibbler head mounted on the platten instead of the saw blade. This will have a fence so that long straight cut can be mode on objects too large to be brought to the table nibbler.
Mike

Black Forest
12-03-2017, 03:33 PM
Hi Bob,
Here is my version of a nibbler table, see:
http://mikesworkshop.weebly.com/a-nibbler-table.html
I have been using it for some time and it works well, especially for fine intricate work.
When I get time I intend to make another nibbler tool which is rather like a jig saw but with a nibbler head mounted on the platten instead of the saw blade. This will have a fence so that long straight cut can be mode on objects too large to be brought to the table nibbler.
Mike

do you have a video of your table in action?

drmico60
12-03-2017, 03:43 PM
Black forest,
I do not have any videos of the table in action.
Mike

Magicniner
12-03-2017, 03:48 PM
Surely commonly available router tables for use with hand routers can have a nibbler fitted fairly simply?
I quite like that idea! :D

MrFluffy
12-03-2017, 04:29 PM
Black forest,
I do not have any videos of the table in action.
Mike

Mike, and I say this with complete sincerity, what a refreshing change!
I've been on a rant about people posting stuff seemingly just to push their youtube channel clicks up and I've stopped following links to youtube as a result. It seems the art of using a few good pictures and a bit of text cover the widget perfectly is a dying art killed off by the adclicks revenue model. And your page is a great example of that dying art.
Nice build too :-)
Sorry OP, back to your thread.

Mcgyver
12-03-2017, 04:45 PM
I've been on a rant about people posting stuff seemingly just to push their youtube channel clicks up and I've stopped following links to youtube as a result. It seems the art of using a few good pictures and a bit of text cover the widget perfectly is a dying art killed off by the adclicks revenue model. .

+1 Most things would be much better covered with a few quality stills and a description. 15 seconds instead of 10 minutes of blabber with crappy music

BLL.....I like the idea.....waiting for pics

drmico60
12-03-2017, 05:35 PM
Mike, and I say this with complete sincerity, what a refreshing change!
I've been on a rant about people posting stuff seemingly just to push their youtube channel clicks up and I've stopped following links to youtube as a result. It seems the art of using a few good pictures and a bit of text cover the widget perfectly is a dying art killed off by the adclicks revenue model. And your page is a great example of that dying art.
Nice build too :-)
Sorry OP, back to your thread.

Thank you for your kind words.
Mike

Dan Dubeau
12-03-2017, 07:09 PM
There's enough room in a table saw to come up with a drop in insert that is powered off the arbor. An eccentric connecting rod could provide the reciprocating motion, and a throat plate would hold the whole works in place. Seeing as how most table saws are of pretty similar design in that area, I bet you could sell a bunch of them.

Edit: It would obviously run way too fast, but it might be possible to change some pulleys to slow it down. Slug collection would be awesome too

Stepside
12-03-2017, 07:43 PM
Bob

In the great Pacific Northwest we call it a "buffet table" not a "nibbler table". Just funnin.

Have you tried one of the nibblers where you supply the drill/power source? If so where did you buy it and did it work? It would seem to be a fun project to build a self-contained nibbler table with a dedicated motor.

As soon as I finish the turret lathe build I will need/want a new project.

Pete

J Tiers
12-03-2017, 07:46 PM
A nibbler table is a great idea. USING a nibbler with the sheet on a table is a distant second IMO, the table with height aligned is exactly what is wanted.

BTW, for those mentioning die filers, many of them were made to double as saws, you can put in a piece of hacksaw in most. For those with a spring loaded plunger overarm, you can use narrower bandsaw sections and operate like a jigsaw. I know the design patent for the Milwaukee dies filer that I had years ago had that application for it shown.

Bob La Londe
12-03-2017, 07:49 PM
The project has gone back burner, but I did use an IR pneumatic nibbler today for the project I was working on. I just roughed out the hole, and then finished with an oscillating drum sander. It worked out just fine. I am still interested in the idea, but I think I'll want to go with something like a Gobbler. Essentially a super nibbler capable of upto 1/4 inch steel and supposedly 1/2 inch aluminum.

boslab
12-03-2017, 08:42 PM
One of the guys in work had a load of stuff to cut with a nibbler, the heavy makita one, he cobbled together an arm with some rollers to guide it, like a radial arm saw with a nibbler stuck on the end, worked really well, we had a floor standing nibbler but it was without a tidy punch at the time, the floor one was ancient, 1940s at a guess
Mark

darryl
12-03-2017, 11:49 PM
Nibbling on 1/4 inch material would require a pretty sturdy mechanism- probably not something you could hack a jigsaw or a sawzall for. I like the idea, and I'd build one for myself. Most of what I do is 16 ga and thinner, but even at that thinness a lot of force is required to chunk out the bits. Currently I use a hand nibbler, which of course works chip by chip. I can see this idea being upsized and operated by a foot pedal. That would make a nice addition to my machines.

If you're used to ploughing through a sheet with a powered nibbler, then this wouldn't fit the bill.

I would definitely try to take advantage of leverage to operate the punch or chunker, whatever you want to call it. Use the motor-actuated connecting rod to push against the leverage instead of being directly connected to the punching arm. And you'd want to make sure you aren't operating it too fast- thousands of seeable chips are better than millions of no-see-ums. And rig up a lube system for it.

Tundra Twin Track
12-04-2017, 12:03 AM
I like the table idea not sure how to configure it.I did something similar for a Die Grinder,found a Wadkin Overarm Router and set it up for metal.I posted it on here a few years back,photos are toast with PB thing.Have not had time to find a alternate host.

Max McGrumpy
12-04-2017, 01:24 AM
Mike, and I say this with complete sincerity, what a refreshing change!
I've been on a rant about people posting stuff seemingly just to push their youtube channel clicks up and I've stopped following links to youtube as a result. It seems the art of using a few good pictures and a bit of text cover the widget perfectly is a dying art killed off by the adclicks revenue model. And your page is a great example of that dying art.
Nice build too :-)
Sorry OP, back to your thread.

This has been an issue in my Facebook group as well. Used to be "post pics or it didn't happen."

Now people expect a professionally produced short video with music, graphics and proper lighting/camera-motion.

Bah.

Black Forest
12-04-2017, 03:04 AM
To those naysayers about a video you might want to think about it some. I have never seen a nibbler of any kind work. Not in real life or on the net or TV. So for me it would be very informative to see Bob's table at work. I asked and he said he didn't have one. No problem. But for those of you that went on a rant about me asking for a video maybe you should step back and think a bit. Some of us learn things differently than others. Not all of us are so gifted as you Mr. Fluffy. We need different means to learn. I am one of those people. A thirty second video of how the table works would explain a lot. It isn't me being lazy and wanting someone else to do my work. It is a learning process for some of us. If I make a video to show something often times it isn't very long and with no narration. A twenty second video can be an A-ha moment for some of us.

Alan Smith
12-04-2017, 03:22 AM
Well said BF

dave_r
12-04-2017, 04:03 AM
I used an air-powered nibbler to cut out the opening for the manual shifter in cab of my truck when I installed a 4wd system in my truck. It was fairly thin sheet metal (maybe 18-20 gauge?), over a surface that switched between concave and convex. A sawzall or hacksaw would probably have bent up the edges, jigsaw body would only enable it to do part of the hole. The nibbler had a small head, just needed to drill a hole to provide the starting point and then go around the outline I drew on the body. It went through the sheet metal like butter, easy to control, and left a nice edge on the sheet metal (in that it was flat, there were lots of nice sharp edges that would be excellent for drawing blood).

MrFluffy
12-04-2017, 04:19 AM
To those naysayers about a video you might want to think about it some. I have never seen a nibbler of any kind work. Not in real life or on the net or TV. So for me it would be very informative to see Bob's table at work. I asked and he said he didn't have one. No problem. But for those of you that went on a rant about me asking for a video maybe you should step back and think a bit. Some of us learn things differently than others. Not all of us are so gifted as you Mr. Fluffy. We need different means to learn. I am one of those people. A thirty second video of how the table works would explain a lot. It isn't me being lazy and wanting someone else to do my work. It is a learning process for some of us. If I make a video to show something often times it isn't very long and with no narration. A twenty second video can be an A-ha moment for some of us.

Youtube is already full of videos with nibblers, from how to unbox one, ones from the manufacturers and comparisons with other tools.
I was applauding mike for not just posting some throwaway youtube and instead linking to a page that he had taken the time and effort to write up, covering a concise explanation of what he had done, which didnt require me to sit through 15 minutes to decide if it was worth watching or not. And evidentally I'm not the only person who prefers to see that.
You dont have to be gifted (in fact I'm not gifted at all myself, just persistant), you just have to think "oh thats interesting" and spend a few minutes looking at whats out there already. So yes, to put it a bit bluntly without intending to be overly rude because I'm a direct talking northern brit by upbringing, you are being a bit lazy.

https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=nibbler+table

You can take faux offense at this, but I'm a bit meh about web communities right now anyway. So knock yourself out.

Black Forest
12-04-2017, 04:46 AM
Youtube is already full of videos with nibblers, from how to unbox one, ones from the manufacturers and comparisons with other tools.
I was applauding mike for not just posting some throwaway youtube and instead linking to a page that he had taken the time and effort to write up, covering a concise explanation of what he had done, which didnt require me to sit through 15 minutes to decide if it was worth watching or not. And evidentally I'm not the only person who prefers to see that.
You dont have to be gifted (in fact I'm not gifted at all myself, just persistant), you just have to think "oh thats interesting" and spend a few minutes looking at whats out there already. So yes, to put it a bit bluntly without intending to be overly rude because I'm a direct talking northern brit by upbringing, you are being a bit lazy.

https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=nibbler+table

You can take faux offense at this, but I'm a bit meh about web communities right now anyway. So knock yourself out.

I don't take any offense to what you wrote at all. You are quite right and I should have just googled nibbler tables. Carry on!

flylo
12-04-2017, 08:01 AM
Bob

In the great Pacific Northwest we call it a "buffet table" not a "nibbler table". Just funnin.

Have you tried one of the nibblers where you supply the drill/power source? If so where did you buy it and did it work? It would seem to be a fun project to build a self-contained nibbler table with a dedicated motor.

As soon as I finish the turret lathe build I will need/want a new project.

Pete

We sold those for cutting 26 ga pole barn steel & they worked great & would cut though the ribs in the steel with no problem. What we sold were actually shears.

JoeLee
12-04-2017, 08:21 AM
I thought nibblers were a thing of the past. I have a small pneumatic one that I haven't used in years mainly because of the way it makes sharp little half moon chips that are "deadly sharp", fly all over the place including in my pockets and stick to my boots and are a PIA to remove. I've found it much faster, cleaner and easier to grind.

Worse than any chips that come off my mill.

http://www.swarfmagic.com.au/images/swarf4.jpg

JL................

drmico60
12-04-2017, 09:15 AM
I thought nibblers were a thing of the past. I have a small pneumatic one that I haven't used in years mainly because of the way it makes sharp little half moon chips that are "deadly sharp", fly all over the place including in my pockets and stick to my boots and are a PIA to remove. I've found it much faster, cleaner and easier to grind.

Worse than any chips that come off my mill.

http://www.swarfmagic.com.au/images/swarf4.jpg

JL................

One benefit of a table nibbler is that it is in one place and all the sharp little nibbles are in one place rather than scattered all over the floor and they are easily collected on a cup and/or with a strategically placed magnet. I am surprised that you say grinding is faster than nibbling. The other benefit of nibbling is that the cut edges are clean and not distorted.

JoeLee
12-04-2017, 09:49 AM
One benefit of a table nibbler is that it is in one place and all the sharp little nibbles are in one place rather than scattered all over the floor and they are easily collected on a cup and/or with a strategically placed magnet. I am surprised that you say grinding is faster than nibbling. The other benefit of nibbling is that the cut edges are clean and not distorted. Having a hole n the table with some sort of collection system would be a huge benefit, anything that keeps those nibbles contained is a plus.

What is the heaviest gage material that can be nibbled??? I think the heaviest my tool can do is like 1/16" maybe. I've always found it cleaner and faster to grind the edge rather than nibble away at it. The clean up is much easier too. If I put an aggressive disc on my hand grinder I can remove a lot of material from an edge almost as fast as a nibbler can.
A lot of guys I know that work in fab shops got away from using them because of the nasty chips that they produce.

JL...............

Bob La Londe
12-04-2017, 10:05 AM
Having a hole n the table with some sort of collection system would be a huge benefit, anything that keeps those nibbles contained is a plus.

What is the heaviest gage material that can be nibbled??? I think the heaviest my tool can do is like 1/16" maybe. I've always found it cleaner and faster to grind the edge rather than nibble away at it. The clean up is much easier too. If I put an aggressive disc on my hand grinder I can remove a lot of material from an edge almost as fast as a nibbler can.
A lot of guys I know that work in fab shops got away from using them because of the nasty chips that they produce.

JL...............

In the low price arena 16 gauge or about 1/16th inch is common, but there is a much more expensive unit called a Gobbler that is claimed to take on upto 1/4 inch mild steel and upto 1/2 inch aluminum.

ACHiPo
12-04-2017, 10:09 AM
Hi Bob,
Here is my version of a nibbler table, see:
http://mikesworkshop.weebly.com/a-nibbler-table.html
I have been using it for some time and it works well, especially for fine intricate work.
When I get time I intend to make another nibbler tool which is rather like a jig saw but with a nibbler head mounted on the platten instead of the saw blade. This will have a fence so that long straight cut can be mode on objects too large to be brought to the table nibbler.
Mike

Mike this is a really cool idea. Your nibbler looks very similar the one I picked up.

Dan_the_Chemist
12-04-2017, 10:10 AM
It would be very easy to make a horizontal nibbler attachment for a shaper. Unfortunately the work would have to be held upright.

browne92
12-04-2017, 10:38 AM
What about a router table with a 1/8" carbide end mill? I'm guessing you might have to slow it down some. Thinking out loud.

Bob La Londe
12-04-2017, 10:47 AM
While I have not done that exactly I've found free hand work with a mill to be quite difficult to control. I have several rotary hand pieces I use for various jobs, and I have tried an end mill. A burr is tends to be easier to control, although larger ones can still take you for a ride.

MrFluffy
12-04-2017, 11:19 AM
I thought nibblers were a thing of the past. I have a small pneumatic one that I haven't used in years mainly because of the way it makes sharp little half moon chips that are "deadly sharp", fly all over the place including in my pockets and stick to my boots and are a PIA to remove. I've found it much faster, cleaner and easier to grind.

Worse than any chips that come off my mill.

http://www.swarfmagic.com.au/images/swarf4.jpg

JL................

There's a type called the monodex hand nibblers, which roll out a 1/16th strip from the material into a giant spiral until you stop and break it off. They are really easy to clean up after and the edges are super safe to handle, but I've never seen a powered version of these, probably because you would then have to remember to stop and break the spiral off at intervals. So concequence, you end up with a grip like a gorilla after a few ft of cut. Maybe I'll power a pair one day when I'm through with a zillion other nice to have tasks.
But, for single sided access to a panel where I don't want spoil being thrown everywhere or sparks or any distortion, to cut out a intricate shape, hand nibblers are my definite go to. I've got some air nibblers too, but I use them less often and more likely to use the air shears in lieu of those as unlikely to need the sharp radius turn capability over a larger cut length.

JoeLee
12-04-2017, 11:28 AM
What about a router table with a 1/8" carbide end mill? I'm guessing you might have to slow it down some. Thinking out loud. With out having the material rigidly held you would shatter the carbide end mill real quick.

JL................

JoeLee
12-04-2017, 11:31 AM
There's a type called the monodex hand nibblers, which roll out a 1/16th strip from the material into a giant spiral until you stop and break it off. They are really easy to clean up after and the edges are super safe to handle, but I've never seen a powered version of these, probably because you would then have to remember to stop and break the spiral off at intervals. So concequence, you end up with a grip like a gorilla after a few ft of cut. Maybe I'll power a pair one day when I'm through with a zillion other nice to have tasks.
But, for single sided access to a panel where I don't want spoil being thrown everywhere or sparks or any distortion, to cut out a intricate shape, hand nibblers are my definite go to. I've got some air nibblers too, but I use them less often and more likely to use the air shears in lieu of those as unlikely to need the sharp radius turn capability over a larger cut length. I've never seen one of those. I do have a scissor or shear mounted to a Milwaukee drill that cuts like that, about a 1/4" wide strip and it rolls it up but I don't think you could trim the edge of a sheet with it, has to be like full engagement.

JL..................

J Tiers
12-04-2017, 11:36 AM
There are power versions. Like this. But most folks insist these are "shears" not nibblers.

https://ssli.ebayimg.com/images/g/fAkAAOSw4GVYP4NX/s-l1600.jpg


The actual monodex are always hand ones, I have one British and one French of the type (they have to be in separate toolboxes or they fight). Like this.

https://thumbs.worthpoint.com/zoom/images1/360/0512/06/monodex-sheet-metal-cutters-nippers_360_21b71aed3a8ff1c63c8428cd1b8e11e5.jpg

MrFluffy
12-04-2017, 02:07 PM
JT, my air shears have a knife edge on the blades and produce a lethal edge on the cut workpiece that requires dressing immediately before you end up with personal leakage all over the workpiece, they do indeed look like powered versions of the hand nibblers. I don't care about what theyre called, as long as I know what to shop for, I'll do some more research save reinventing the wheel and making my own.

JL, no if you try to cut too near the edge and you dont have the shoes adjusted tight (the monodex's permit this, just enough drag so you can still operate them but feel the cutter brushing the shoe edges does it for me), it tries to fold the edge over and jams the tool so its a bit of a exercise in futility. But if I'm cutting up to a open edge, it goes in the bench hand shear or on the guilotine anyway. For the price (about $15 or so I think here), theyre a extra useful thing to have though.

J Tiers
12-04-2017, 06:01 PM
JT, my air shears have a knife edge on the blades and produce a lethal edge on the cut workpiece that requires dressing immediately before you end up with personal leakage all over the workpiece, they do indeed look like powered versions of the hand nibblers. .....

Yes, they are sharper than heck.

Whoever said that about nice safe edges cannot have seen any I have cut.... you could shave with the edges, no stropping needed.

MrFluffy
12-05-2017, 07:36 AM
The hand nibblers I have you can handle the edges with no dressing, in fact I break the swirls off by working them back and forth with my fingers. If the shear type nibblers dont produce a safe to handle edge as cut, I'll pass on them.

drmico60
12-06-2017, 06:07 AM
Yes, they are sharper than heck.

Whoever said that about nice safe edges cannot have seen any I have cut.... you could shave with the edges, no stropping needed.

My comment regarding the edges was based on my experience with the type of nibblers that attach to an electric drill, see : http://mikesworkshop.weebly.com/nibbler.html , and produce the crescent shaped offcuts. The crescents are sharp but the cut edge is not sharp.
Mike

DR
12-06-2017, 07:01 AM
Table nibblers...yeah, great idea. It's been done as large stationary machines for many, many years. Throat depth is an issue with them if working large panels.

I would mount the hand held style nibbler above the table rather than under. With above table the nasty moon shape cuttings go down out of the way. With under table mounting the cuttings are flying upward all over the table and getting in your way.

Of course, mounting above the table requires some sort of stiff over arm to mount to with inherent throat depth issues (like with a scroll saw). I did once see an interesting solution to the over arm mount problem with a different type tool. The owner's shop was in his basement so he mounted the tool hanging down from the overhead floor joints. Obviously, his setup could not be easily moved around his shop though.

Doozer
12-06-2017, 09:14 AM
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_xurB-3wI3g

alanganes
12-06-2017, 04:33 PM
Hi Bob,
Here is my version of a nibbler table, see:
http://mikesworkshop.weebly.com/a-nibbler-table.html
I have been using it for some time and it works well, especially for fine intricate work.
When I get time I intend to make another nibbler tool which is rather like a jig saw but with a nibbler head mounted on the platten instead of the saw blade. This will have a fence so that long straight cut can be mode on objects too large to be brought to the table nibbler.
Mike

Mike, Now that you have had it for a while what is your overall impression of that nibbler tool you built this around? It looks to be pretty much the same one that was popping up all over Amazon, Facebook, etc a while back pitched as a "NEW WONDER TOOL!" They were not all that expensive from what I recall. I have a center-cut type power shear like this one (https://www.ohiopowertool.com/p-4058-kett-metal-shears-double-cut-18-gauge-kd-400-20-gauge-stainless.aspx?gclid=EAIaIQobChMI6N-wi6r21wIVAwRpCh3BAQYEEAQYBSABEgKrifD_BwE) but a small unit like what you built would be pretty handy for some of what I do at times.

Just curious if you feel the nibbler itself has been reasonably robust for the amount and type of use it gets. For what they seem to cost here I'd [EDIT: meant to say "I'd NOT expect..."] expect industrial strength, but I'd hate to build something around it and have it wear out in really short order.

Really like your website, by the way. So much inspiration!

drmico60
12-06-2017, 05:08 PM
Mike, Now that you have had it for a while what is your overall impression of that nibbler tool you built this around? It looks to be pretty much the same one that was popping up all over Amazon, Facebook, etc a while back pitched as a "NEW WONDER TOOL!" They were not all that expensive from what I recall. I have a center-cut type power shear like this one (https://www.ohiopowertool.com/p-4058-kett-metal-shears-double-cut-18-gauge-kd-400-20-gauge-stainless.aspx?gclid=EAIaIQobChMI6N-wi6r21wIVAwRpCh3BAQYEEAQYBSABEgKrifD_BwE) but a small unit like what you built would be pretty handy for some of what I do at times.

Just curious if you feel the nibbler itself has been reasonably robust for the amount and type of use it gets. For what they seem to cost here I'd expect industrial strength, but I'd hate to build something around it and have it wear out in really short order.

Really like your website, by the way. So much inspiration!

Alan, I have used the tool, on and off, for several years but only for hobby work so it has not had a heavy duty cycle. It performs very well on mild steel sheet up to 1 mm thick and it will cut 1.5 mm sheet although I have only done this on one occasion. I have not had to swap the cutter head or change the cutter punch. It will cut 1 mm mild steel at at least 1 metre/minute so it is fast and it leaves a good clean edge. I think it is excellent value for money ( I paid about 20 GBP which is about 30 USD). It certainly beats aviation shears for ease of use and clean cut.

As purchased the kit is designed to fit on an electric portable drill but in this form it is quite difficult to control with any accuracy which is why the first mod that I did was to fix the nibbler head to the drill by a collar. This stop the nibbler head from swivelling on the drill and makes it much easier to control. At a later stage I made the nibbler table for doing more precision work.

Mike

J Tiers
12-06-2017, 05:32 PM
I like that Campbell nibbler. 1/4" steel capacity? Nice.

Of course a plasma cutter would also be nice, but the Campbell can be repaired by any capable machine shop.....

CCWKen
12-06-2017, 06:30 PM
If you frequently work with small hand held sheets/pieces of metal, get a Throatless Sheer. HF has a decent bench top mounded version for about $140. They also have an electric hand held version that will cut 18ga 1008 without a problem. I have that one and use it frequently for cutting blanks out of whole sheets. I've been wanting to mount it in a table (upside down) for smaller pieces but I use it too often on large pieces. And I just don't have the room for it now.

DR
12-06-2017, 07:41 PM
The Kett type shear and the throatless shear are substantially different than a nibbler. Didn't we have this discussion a while back?

Given my choice if I could only have one, Kett, throatless shear or nibbler, it'd be the nibbler. Nibbler is the only one that'll cut small radius curves or begin a cut in the middle of a panel with only a small starting hole.

alanganes
12-06-2017, 09:33 PM
I have a small throatless shear, a "Beverly Jr" which is amazingly useful. Got in a lot buy of other junk and found it to be super handy for lots of little stuff. A small table style nibbler just seems to have some nice functionality to add to the mix.

Mike, thanks for the reply. I think my use would be somewhat similar to yours, occasional hobby type duty. Migth be worth it just for the fun of it.