PDA

View Full Version : 3d printer recommendations



Dan Dubeau
12-27-2017, 09:21 AM
Hope everyone had a good Christmas and holiday.

Got some unexpected cash ($200) from my father in law this Christmas and was told it was to be only used for tools for myself. I know, I won the inlaw lottery. They also gave me a bottle of Rye to "help put up with their daughter"....just kidding, she's great too.

Anyway, I was planning on getting a printer in the new year and had a budget around 4-500, and had it narrowed down to a few models, but now with the extra cash I'm wondering if bumping up the budget would get me more machine.

I'm looking for an FDM printer to be able to print ABS, PLA, and that flexible stuff (still not sure of all the nomenclature). From what I gather, it's tougher to print abs on the cheaper machines? 10x10x10 would be a good size,

The prusa I3, and it's various clones seem to keep coming up to the top of the heap, but there's such a wide range of prices on them I'm not sure what I'm getting. I DON"T want something put together with 80/20 and ready rod that keeps falling apart every 2 hours. But I don't want to pay extra for lipstick on a pig. I also don't mind waiting a couple months if a couple hundred more dollars will get me a much better machine. Not sure where the price shelf is on these between garbage, and usable tool. I'd rather pay extra for good solid electronics and controls, with some room for improvement in the mechanical side, as that's playing more to my strengths than needing to upgrade electrical components.

Here are some I'm looking at.

Prusa-i3 (https://www.amazon.ca/Prusa-i3-Aluminium-Structure-stability/dp/B01NBF6MHZ/ref=sr_1_2_sspa?ie=UTF8&qid=1514381295&sr=8-2-spons&keywords=3d+printer&psc=1)

ALUNAR1 (https://www.amazon.ca/ALUNAR-Self-assembly-Personal-Multicolor-Printing/dp/B06WWR2V5D/ref=sr_1_34_sspa?ie=UTF8&qid=1514381340&sr=8-34-spons&keywords=3d+printer&psc=1)

JGAURORA (https://www.amazon.ca/JGAURORA-Printer-Printers-Assembly-filament/dp/B06XKQYL43/ref=sr_1_14?ie=UTF8&qid=1514381295&sr=8-14&keywords=3d+printer)

And there's also the Monoprice (https://www.amazon.ca/Monoprice-Select-Printer-Heated-Filament/dp/B01FL49VZE/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1514381295&sr=8-3&keywords=3d+printer). Much smaller work envelope, but attractive price, and nice design.

Any other models I'm missing? Better places to buy for a Canadian than amazon? Any "gotcha's" I'm missing?

I'm jumping in the deep end here with little to no knowledge, and I know this question has been asked here many times before, but with such rapidly changing technology I figured it wouldn't hurt to ask again in case there was something I was missing. Thanks in advance.

KJ1I
12-27-2017, 10:13 AM
Within that same style is the Creality CR-10. All share the same issue when printing ABS - ABS needs to stay warm while being printed, so the printer need an enclosure, which none of the i3 style have. But its not hard to add one.

Check out https://all3dp.com/1/best-3d-printer-reviews-top-3d-printers-home-3-d-printer-3d/

In your case, I'd stick to your original budget for the machine and use the "gift money" to get a supply of various filaments. At $20 to $50 per spool, it adds up quick.

Check out https://www.lifewire.com/3d-materials-suppliers-2229

3 Phase Lightbulb
12-27-2017, 10:24 AM
If you can increase your budget a smidgen, I highly suggest a LulzBot Mini. They are open source printers and they are really high quality. You also get .stl files for all of the parts on the printer that were 3d printed.

https://www.amazon.com/LulzBot-Mini-Desktop-3D-Printer/dp/B00S54E1AI

https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/81zr5ZEMQrL._SL1500_.jpg

Dan Dubeau
12-27-2017, 10:33 AM
If you can increase your budget a smidgen, I highly suggest a LulzBot Mini. They are open source printers and they are really high quality. You also get .stl files for all of the parts on the printer that were 3d printed.

https://www.amazon.com/LulzBot-Mini-Desktop-3D-Printer/dp/B00S54E1AI



Easy there big guy, I might be able to go up a smidgen (https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/smidgen) but I don't have bitcoin money.... :)

Thanks Kevin, I'll look into that model too. I think you've got a good plan in saving that extra money for filament. Or getting something cheap like the monoprice, and put the extra towards a plasma cutter.....

MrFluffy
12-27-2017, 10:40 AM
Within that same style is the Creality CR-10. All share the same issue when printing ABS - ABS needs to stay warm while being printed, so the printer need an enclosure, which none of the i3 style have.
No they don't need an enclosure.
I hardly ever use pla, I mostly use abs/nylon and ninjaflex on my printrbot simple metal for some years now, and it has never had an enclosure.

Dan, for abs, it needs a heated bed or you will have a right job trying to fight warp as it tries to unstick itself off the bed printing onto a cold bed. But even then, its possible, if a bit fraught to having tears of frustration.

3 Phase Lightbulb
12-27-2017, 10:43 AM
I assume they all have heated beds? Just make sure you get one with a heated bed and a good printing surface like PEI laminated.

MrFluffy
12-27-2017, 11:07 AM
I was just looking at the $469 printrbot play, and it makes no mention of heated bed and is quite a few hundred dollars cheaper than their other offerings, so no, it appears even now they dont all have heated beds. My printrbot simple metal didnt have a heated bed, but I added one afterwards as its also all open hardware/source, and stretched the bed in x and z and added a few more extruders too. I've had it a few years though.
I was told by someone else in person I couldnt print abs without a enclosure, as he watched it finishing off printing a large piece in ... abs.

Another tip for dan, buy some good filament for it too, not just what comes free with it. Cheap no name filament can have odd bits in it that cause nozzle clogging, or fragile sections, Ive had rolls where the temperature of extrusion has needed to change halfway in and all sorts of oddities over the years as it depends what got threw into the hopper when they were extruding that day. When your starting off, you want a consistant experience and I've never had a bad one with hatchbox even if it is a couple of dollars more than the cheapest.

RB211
12-27-2017, 11:10 AM
I have an I3 Prusia Mk2s, soon to be a mk2.5. Their new Mark 3 looks amazing, and has features that no one else has yet, like a PEI powder coated flexible base you can simply pop the parts off of. I now print ABS exclusively for the past few months without an enclosure. The key is to have no draft but still need ventilation. If I turn on the ceiling fan overhead, it warps and pops the part off before itís done. The heated PEI base is almost a must. The heated part IS a requirement. I have the flexible stuff too, havenít used it yet. Going to make cell phone case with it and tires for my models. Going to give Polycarbonate a try, as a potential replacement for ABS. PLA has too low of a temperature resistance for my uses in Florida.
People seem to like the CR10, it lacks features of the Prusa i3 that I simply find a must for convenience. However it would appear you are paying a premium for the conveniences.
Save 150$ in your budget for Simplify3D, and save time in your life to learn a 3d cad package such as Fusion360. 3D printers get very boring without knowing 3D cad.

BobinOK
12-27-2017, 12:37 PM
Bought a Monoprice Maker Select V2 just before Christmas and very happy with the printer and Monoprice support. A referb can be had for $250.00, or $300.00 for new. It has a slightly less than 8 X 8 X 8 build envelope, heated bed and will do ABS among others. It does require some mechanical help right out of the box but the parts are cheap or can be made with the printer itself. Easy to get working well enough to make small stuff, harder when you start doing something 7 inches long but not that hard, at least on mine it wasn't. I'm still using the original BuildTak surface which has been great once I had the bed level and nozzle spacing correct.

So far I have only used PLA also bought from Monoprice printing stuff I found on Thingiverse. DesignSpark Mechanical and FreeDAD are two free 3D design apps available on the net. I have both on a Windows 7 computer but have not done enough in either one to say much. YouTube has many videos on both.

skunkworks
12-27-2017, 12:49 PM
If you want to get your feet wet - you can get the mono price mini for a bit under $200. I got one to see if I would get into it. I had pretty low expectations when I went into it - and have been pleasantly surprised.

http://electronicsam.com/images/matsuura/20170525_132343.jpg

http://electronicsam.com/images/matsuura/20170511_140046.jpg

you do need to make a couple mods.. (this is the only one I have done - the bed wiring breaks pretty quick)

http://electronicsam.com/images/matsuura/20170608_135243.jpg

Norman Bain
12-27-2017, 04:30 PM
For draft sheilding the Cura slicer has an experimental feature/setting on their latest version called "Enable Draft Sheild".

There are a couple of settings that go with it, like how far from the part the shield is created, but essentially it builds up a one-layer wide ring/wall around your part as the part grows. The Help Tip says is for use with materials that warp easily.

Other slicers may also have this feature.

Paul Alciatore
12-27-2017, 04:31 PM
If you are considering smaller machines, then I just got a Cetus 180mm x 180mm x 170mm and it seems to be quite good. My first print was successful and I also printed a part that I designed myself on the first try. They have a coating on their platform that allows good adhesion while printing. They also say that you can use different materials, but I haven't tried that yet, just PLA that came with it.

I had a bit of trouble with their software on my laptop (low end HP of several years ago) but it worked perfectly on my desk tower. I haven't had the time to look into the laptop problem yet.

Jon Heron
12-27-2017, 04:39 PM
I just pulled the trigger on one of these the other day when our dollar hit .79USD. I hope to get it in February.
https://shop.prusa3d.com/en/3d-printers/180-original-prusa-i3-mk3-kit.html#/11-color-black_printed_parts
Can anybody give me some advice on what filaments to buy and any other important options I should consider such as nozzles etc...
Cheers,
Jon

RB211
12-27-2017, 07:46 PM
I have the previous model. You made an excellent choice. It comes with a spool of PLA. Amazon Hatchbox works well with it at lower temps than he suggests for his filaments. Practice with PLA first then give ABS a try.

Dan Dubeau
12-30-2017, 05:38 PM
So much exhaustive research and debating one over the other I kind of ended up with something I was dead against from the start. I pulled the trigger on this Anet A6 (https://www.banggood.com/Anet-A6-3D-Printer-DIY-Kit-1_75mm-0_4mm-Support-ABS-PLA-HIPS-p-1130754.html?rmmds=search&cur_warehouse=CN).

My reasoning is that I'm kind of interested in the tinkering "kit" aspect of it, and all the upgrading (something I didn't want from the start). From scouring the internet It seems like, unless I spend over $1000 I'm still buying something based on the same designs, using the same components, with pretty much all the same pluses and minuses. I've had a big interest in learning electronics lately so this will be a good purposeful project that I can learn on and play around with.

I could come to regret this purchase, but only time will tell. I bet I'll learn something in the process though so that's gotta be worth something....lol. I've wasted more money and got less.... :)

I have noted some of the dangerous safety issues with this board design, and have ordered all the parts to fix them, and will do it right from go. I ordered from the US warehouse so It should be here in less than 2 weeks.

Now to buy some filament with the left over money.

And Paul Schoen, I blame you for introducing me to banggood way back when you posted that cheap inductive heater module. Never heard about it before that, but I've spent more than I'd like to admit there since then.....That's kind of been the driving point behind me wanting to learn more about electronics.

CCWKen
12-30-2017, 07:10 PM
Somebody on another thread said you can get into 3D printing and print lathe gears for less than $100. I wanna see those! :cool:

fixerdave
12-30-2017, 07:47 PM
... Can anybody give me some advice on what filaments to buy ...

If it's going to be a tool, rather than a toy, then I suggest some Flexible PLA, with lets you solve a few other problems (like bumpers). Nylon (I managed to get my little printer going with Nylon 645... there are lots of grades), and I highly recommend TPE80A, the rubbery stuff. That last one was nasty to get working... and just barely at that. But, it is so useful. It's also very light so a 1/2kg spool is almost as long as a full spool of PLA.

My printer is a bowden tube type (extruder -> tube -> print head instead of having the extruder right at the head). They say TPE80A won't work with bowden tubes, but it did with mine. I had to design and print a little space-eliminator where the filament wanted to spill out instead of going down the tube. But, after that, it fed just fine. Not saying everyone will have the same success, but it's useful enough to be worth the try (and early frustration). Also, it does not stick well to the bed at all. I nearly gave up until I tried double-sided carpet tape. Even with that, it still shrinks badly and pulls up on anything large. But, the small cross-section stuff prints okay. A surprisingly large number of small rubbery things are quite useful to have.

Being in Canada, try filaments.ca. They have a 10-roll variety pack. I've barely made a dent in it.

I still haven't even tried the ABS. The pack came with uv-resistant PLA and some brass-PLA stuff as well. I tried shining up the brass... gave up. I suspect it's just something I don't have the patience for. Maybe one day I'll try the wood-PLA. So many options... no end of the fun :)

David...

Dan Dubeau
12-30-2017, 08:26 PM
Being in Canada, try filaments.ca. They have a 10-roll variety pack. I've barely made a dent in it.

David...

Thanks for that link. They're not too far away from the mill my wife picks up her bulk yarn orders from. I can see some dual duty trips into the city in our future, and a stop at California sandwiches for a giant veal parmigiana sandwich for lunch (the only reason I go with her sometimes).

$125 for free shipping isn't too bad either. I'll probably put an order in tonight after I do some more figuring out what I need. So many choices....

tmarks11
12-30-2017, 09:24 PM
Can anybody give me some advice on what filaments to buy...

I haven't had a failed print yet with this stuff, and I am on my third roll. Decent price, and I have read a lot of others recommending it.
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B01EKEMIIS

Dan Dubeau
12-30-2017, 10:38 PM
I just placed an order for this PLA (https://www.amazon.ca/AMZ3D-1-75mm-Printer-Filament-Black/dp/B01BZ5ND8O/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1514690414&sr=8-1&keywords=AMZ3D) in a couple colours, a roll of black ABS, and some Glow in the dark PLA (https://www.amazon.ca/gp/product/B071YPSV52/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o00_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1). Filaments.ca has a large selection, and decent prices, but were sold out of a lot of the things I wanted so I went with amazon.

Should be enough to get me going and play around a bit. I want to get some Flexible TPE and have a try printing some carb boots. And also some wax for casting, although casting is a distant project right now.

Also downloaded Cura and was playing around with it for a bit. I loaded a bunch of things I've made and or designed already and played around slicing them etc. All seems pretty straight forward. Going to try Slicer too.

mattthemuppet
12-30-2017, 11:08 PM
I really like the Cetus 3D printer that we got the girls for Christmas, though the recommendation is a bit late :) Nothing else to compare it to, but the software is easy to use, support seems decent and I've already printed off a bunch of QCTP holder holders. Currently printing some right now! Still have to start learning Fusion 360 so I can really make the most of this.

Ken - that was probably me on the Atlas 618 thread :) I've seen full gear sets going for $150-200, so it would be sort of possible to get a printer to print gears for the price of a gear set. Probably take a lot longer, but at least at the end of it you'd also have a 3D printer! Strengthwise I'm sure they'd be fine given the amount of use they're likely to see. Probably be quieter too.

elf
12-31-2017, 01:42 AM
Weed trimmer nylon works fairly well and is quite inexpensive.

RB211
12-31-2017, 11:46 AM
Weed trimmer nylon works fairly well and is quite inexpensive.
Interesting idea!
I want to try Polycarbonate...

Jon Heron
12-31-2017, 02:56 PM
Good stuff guys thanks for the links and detailed info!
Happy New Years everyone!
Jon

KJ1I
12-31-2017, 03:53 PM
Just a quick note on slicers - do not believe the estimated build time. My first print took a lot longer than the slicer estimated (2 hours vs 20 minutes). I did a little on line research and found this is a problem common to all slicers.

RB211
12-31-2017, 03:56 PM
Just a quick note on slicers - do not believe the estimated build time. My first print took a lot longer than the slicer estimated (2 hours vs 20 minutes). I did a little on line research and found this is a problem common to all slicers.

Simplify3D is anywhere from 5 minutes to 1 hour off depending on the size of the print, layer height, etc. I like using the cost calculation though. Right now I am printing PC expansion slot covers out of ABS, and printed 3.5" to 2.5" drive mounting brackets. Beats the crap having to drive to a store or mail order for these things, and make them for pennies!

Mike of the North
12-31-2017, 05:35 PM
Just a couple pieces of info, I believe polycarbonate gives off dangerous fumes, so be careful, trimmer line needs to be dried out to work, and glow in the dark filament is abrasive, so your tip may wear out quicker.

KJ1I
12-31-2017, 08:26 PM
I frequently cut polycarb on the laser. This is from the MSDS (SDS):

Processing fumes may cause irritation to the eyes, skin and respiratory tract.

Grease-like processing fume condensates on ventilation ductwork, molds and other surfaces can cause irritation and injury to the skin.

Medical Restrictions:
There are no known human health effects aggravated by exposure to this product. However, certain sensitive individuals with respiratory impairments may be affected by exposure to components in the processing vapors.

RB211
12-31-2017, 10:24 PM
ABS however does give off fumes, must ventilate.

garyhlucas
12-31-2017, 10:32 PM
I wanted a printer for my grandson who is 14 and in a STEM program. I also wanted to see one first. MicroCenter had a display that often running, a Wanhao powerspec I3 Duplicator on sale for $299. All metal and construction seemed robust and repairable. Grandson got sick Christmas day and I had to go out of town on Tuesday. Tuesday evening he had assembled the couple of pieces, calibrated the table height and printed his first two parts from the supplied SD card. He sent pictures. Has SD card slot so it can run standalone, heated bed and about 8” cube build area. Seems okay.

KJ1I
01-01-2018, 12:17 AM
Ah yes, ABS. There is a difference between hazardous and stink. You definitely don't want to process hazardous materials and you definitely do want to vent those that smell. I cut a lot of non-hazardous materials on the laser that STINK. Thank goodness the laser has a powerful fan attached and vents outdoors (we're on 2 acres so I don't have to worry about the neighbors). I tried a sample print of ABS but stopped it because of the smell (I had been warned by my research that ABS smelled like cooking plastic). Then again, the printer is temporarily setup in the living room.

gstprecision
01-01-2018, 02:04 PM
I got a Prusa I3 clone from Electronicgeek.ca works great but it there is a lot to learn using these printers.

Had some issues with mine, the heat bed Mosfet fried on 2 different boards. I ended up buying an extermal Mosfet and it been working great since.

I am glad I got it from a Canadian retailer, they were great with warranty and replacement parts.

GST

Dan Dubeau
01-01-2018, 03:06 PM
I got a Prusa I3 clone from Electronicgeek.ca works great but it there is a lot to learn using these printers.

Had some issues with mine, the heat bed Mosfet fried on 2 different boards. I ended up buying an extermal Mosfet and it been working great since.

I am glad I got it from a Canadian retailer, they were great with warranty and replacement parts.

GST

That is one of the big concerns with the Anet A6 I ordered, so I ordered a couple external ones and will wire one in during the build before I fire it up. Also going to add an IEC power cord and fused switch. Also directly solder the wires to the heated bedplate.

I've been bringing myself up to "virtual" speed with youtube university the past couple days while I've been off work. It's going to be a long wait till it gets here, but I'm looking forward to it.

RTPBurnsville
01-01-2018, 05:44 PM
A friend of mine has 3 of these machines and is very happy with them:

https://robo3d.com/products/r1-plus-3d-printer

Robert

Dan Dubeau
01-12-2018, 09:51 PM
It's here, it's together, and it's making things.

Got it together Wednesday and finished up Thursday night. It was a breeze putting it together following the you tube instructions, and the wiring is almost foolproof. I was not super impressed with the quality of the components and was pretty skeptical of pretty much the whole thing. My expectations were pretty low going in, but that's what I signed on for, and why I bought an Anet A6 kit, instead of spending 3 times more for a better name and better "quality". That being said, when I first powered it up and homed it, leveled the bed, then selected to print a sample piece is when my experience changed. It worked, first try, no screwing around with anything just select the file and hit go. 45min later I had a utterly useless "chesspiece" but there it was, my first print. I gotta say for the rickety piece of junk it actually printed something that didn't look too bad. I've seen and held a few printed parts over the years (including the prototype door handle that "exploded" in my hands shortly after the customer finished telling me how expensive it was...) but this actually wasn't the worst. For a ~$250 Cdn kit built from the cheapest import components you can ship that still fit the visual description I'm actually pretty impressed with it. As is, it will make usable parts for what I want it for. With a bit more tweaking, and learning heat settings, slicer stuff, and other tips and tricks I'm sure it will only get better.

Had some fun with the kids tonight printing some name tags for them. Looking forward to making some more toys and things with the kids. The look of excitement and curiosity on their faces as they watched things "grow" on the bed was worth the cost of entry.

https://i.imgur.com/U98YOjNl.jpg

I've made many things many different ways, in all kinds of different media, but never have I made anything so effortlessly with so little physical input and effort before. That's what impressed me the most with this whole process. CNC barfed lathe is a close second, but you still have to prepare and load the bars. This was all just a couple button clicks. I'm impressed.

MrFluffy
01-13-2018, 04:56 PM
Weed trimmer nylon works fairly well and is quite inexpensive.

And yet, every time I tried it I clogged the nozzle. And some research revealed they reinforce it with strands of extra material to strengthen it.
A roll of taulman specialist filament is quite affordable, and there's enough to go wrong with 3d printing without adding to it.

MrFluffy
01-13-2018, 05:03 PM
Had some fun with the kids tonight printing some name tags for them. Looking forward to making some more toys and things with the kids. The look of excitement and curiosity on their faces as they watched things "grow" on the bed was worth the cost of entry.

One of the best fun cheap tricks to show the kids is putting a @pause in the layers between the base of the tag and the letters which you design the part so they are proud of the other surfaces. You can then print in multiple colours on a single colour printer with no extra hardware by changing the filament when its paused. I have some pics somewhere of keyrings I did with the kids names on, but the same technique you can see here putting the "Fluffy engineering" writing on my printed multifix qctp toolholder wall mounts.
http://gallery.pipandphil.com/Vehicles/workshop/multifix_block2.jpg

MrFluffy
01-13-2018, 05:05 PM
Not to spam your thread, but just found the pic.
http://gallery.pipandphil.com/Vehicles/workshop/keyrings_for_kids.jpg

Dan Dubeau
01-13-2018, 06:32 PM
I'm going to try a colour change shortly. I've been ignoring chores and playing around with various slicers and settings trying to learn all day. I'll see if I can find those name tags now (kids have them scattered around the house), but that's kinda how I did it. Made a perimeter around the letters to connect everything, then made the letters proud of that. Don't worry about spamming the thread. More the merrier.

Printed a business card glider this morning but it got knocked over on the bed. Had to print the top half separate and glue them together. Other than that it printed "ok", not great, but usable. Flys like **** though ha ha. I think it was just too tall to print properly so all the back and forth had it wobbling around pretty good while printing. Printing a new phone case right now, so I can try a couple shapes and size it properly, then I'm going to try one in glow in the dark pla.

Phone case just finished as I way typing. Fits perfect. Now for one in glow.

https://i.imgur.com/iK6eRYhl.jpg
https://i.imgur.com/WE5kzmCl.jpg
https://i.imgur.com/M9cTWFDl.jpg

I've looked down my nose at these things for years, questioning their usefulness, and build quality. Well, it's time for me to eat my words a bit. This thing, compared to a real machine, is an absolute heap of crap. so much flex and play in all axis' i'm amazed it even works at all. Yet here it is, just chugging away by itself, with little to no input from me, making things that are actually useful and useable. I'm not going to sell all my tools and replace them with a bunch of printers, but for the cost of this thing it's going to be a nice addition, and for stuff within it's capabilities will be pretty handy to have around. Colour me happily surprised.

My only big complaint about the whole thing is I don't know why stl is the defacto cad file standard for slicers. Step, and Iges would have been so much better choices. But everything seemed to settle on stl. I'm sure there is a reason for it, but it's such a limitation.

garyhlucas
01-13-2018, 07:46 PM
STL is a triangular mesh surface format making the slicing of the model much easier to do and greatly reducing the processing time. When your Cad or Cam program shows you a Step or Iges model it creates a meshed surface for you video card to use to create the image. Solids modelers hide this process from you, but it is there. Work with a surface modeler like Rhino which has meshing as a separate step and you can see how it works.

MrFluffy
01-13-2018, 08:20 PM
I love glow in the dark filaments but they're weaker I have found so keep it for decorative stuff. My home den is covered with printed characters from arcade lore and the wall hangers for the various controllers are in it and there's a blue tube that makes them zap as we have lights off as use a (barco)CRT projector for the display.
You should try printing it in the dark and watch... I think its awesome to watch as it comes out glowing then fades as it cools, or maybe I am still just a kid at heart...

Dan Dubeau
01-13-2018, 09:32 PM
Gary, I'm using rhino for my modeling. I'll admit I'm not the most knowledgeable when it comes to all the various cad file formats and their technical virtues, but I do work with step and iges files daily (solid and surface modeling and cnc programming) and have for the past 14 years. They're easy to open, edit, and change in pretty much any cad program out there. STL files are a pain to modify, and lack features, and precision.

Had to take a break to do bedtime with the kids and do some chores. But I drew up and printed my first hinge before I did. That ranks right up there among the coolest thing I've ever built. Just something very cool about printing something in place with a working hinge built into the middle of it. I'm a kid at heart too Mrfluffy, hope I always will be.

Might give it a break for a while tonight. Starting to turn into one of those guys who wants to 3d print everything.....

MrFluffy
01-14-2018, 06:07 AM
Yes, the 3d printing everything even when its not appropriate is a trap a LOT of the maker crowd have fell into permanently, but because they don't really know better in my opinion. That will dull with time, then you will go to using it as a tool when it fits the use case. For me, the workflow is either non critical strength parts that would benefit from being in abs because of environmental (rust etc..) or as a cheap throwaway prototyping material.

Typical workflow, 3d CAD of a part
http://gallery.pipandphil.com/Vehicles/workshop/clutch_centre.jpg

Exported to stl format, sliced then 3d printed to check it works within the accuracy of the limitations of the 3d printer and plastic and fits the mating parts.
http://gallery.pipandphil.com/Vehicles/workshop/printed_clutch_centre.jpg

Then the original 3d design passed through a cam toolchain instead of being converted to stl etc, and set up to cut the inner spline surface to wire out a test piece.
http://gallery.pipandphil.com/Vehicles/workshop/clutch_spline_test_insitu.jpg

Then test fit on the shaft for final commitment before using the final stock (because it was $$$$ of graded raw material, and they were my $$$$). No end pictures, I like to keep some parts under my cloak otherwise I see copies pop up on other peoples projects before I get chance to race them for myself.
http://gallery.pipandphil.com/Vehicles/workshop/clutch_centre_testpiece.jpg

Rapid prototyping work. Useful indeed. Anyone who dismisses them as toys for hsm types has never really used one to its full potential.

Dan Dubeau
01-14-2018, 09:53 AM
Yes, the 3d printing everything even when its not appropriate is a trap a LOT of the maker crowd have fell into permanently, but because they don't really know better in my opinion.
Rapid prototyping work. Useful indeed. Anyone who dismisses them as toys for hsm types has never really used one to its full potential.

That has been my main gripe with the "maker" and 3d printer crowd the whole time. They're cool, and useful, but they're a supplementary means of manufacturing something. Stop tryin to print an m3 thread in stuff, and just run a damn tap down the hole lol. But I guess with the whole field still in infancy there's still a lot of proverbial dick measuring goin' on between everyone.

After last nights hinge experiment, I'm going to try and print some gears today. Something small with a couple meshing gears that the kids can play with. My boy (5) is totally into this whole experience, whereas my girl (3.5) just want's to play hockey lol, go figure. He was playing with Mechano yesterday afternoon, and there was some Lego sitting on the table. I said "hey buddy, wouldn't it be cool if we had a piece of Lego that would connect with the Mechano?" He looked at me, looked down at the 2 pieces and said with excitement "we could 3d print something". What a time to be a kid I tell ya.

The glider yesterday took about 1:45, and while he was watching it print he said, "awe, hurry up, this is boring. Mommy's printer made airplanes way faster than this one" lol. Thinking back to the time when my wife printed a couple fold along the lines planes on paper. He also said "I got a baaaad feeling about this one dad, this doesn't even look like an airplane".

Maybe I'll load that pink filament in there today and try and bring my daughter back into the fold a bit. I'm also going to make some personalized air hockey pucks for my buddy's kids table they got for Christmas.

https://i.imgur.com/NE5QtxDl.jpg

MrFluffy
01-14-2018, 11:08 AM
Something else to play with, the glow filament + the layer technique, to make light up glowing badges.
http://gallery.pipandphil.com/Vehicles/workshop/glow_smiley.jpg

Changing filaments will get old really soon, I have 6 places for spools above the machine, and a wall covered in hangers for the drums. The 6 places all permit the rolls to turn independantly on cheap ebay skate bearings, and have roller guides to guide the filament into a central feed for the printer so no filament feed snags.
That way a change of filament is seconds work, since they near the final point, pause, release the tension on the feed gears and just whip out the hot on and push the new one in until the ooze coming out changes colour, wipe, restart. It's also great if your machine can do multi filament prints, or you plan on adapting it to do in future (I have 3 independent hot ends on my PB now, two bowden fed and one direct drive to cope with pesky flexible filaments).

Taking a closer look at your picture, it might benefit if you set your slicer final layer shell thickness or whatever they call it in the config slightly thicker. The slicer is leaving 0.1 or whatever for final solid layer to close off hollow structures (which unless you print at 100% infil, is exactly what they should and what you want, hollow = less filament + less warp) but sometimes when closing the hollows a narrow shell final layer isn't sufficient to get all the holes bridged fully and you get dots in the final layer. But it looks pretty good for this early on in the game for sure.

3 Phase Lightbulb
01-14-2018, 12:03 PM
Video of our LulzBot Minis printing RC car parts.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=22Q35r7QgGs&feature=youtu.be

Dan Dubeau
01-14-2018, 12:24 PM
Something else to play with, the glow filament + the layer technique, to make light up glowing badges.

Changing filaments will get old really soon, I have 6 places for spools above the machine, and a wall covered in hangers for the drums. The 6 places all permit the rolls to turn independantly on cheap ebay skate bearings, and have roller guides to guide the filament into a central feed for the printer so no filament feed snags.
That way a change of filament is seconds work, since they near the final point, pause, release the tension on the feed gears and just whip out the hot on and push the new one in until the ooze coming out changes colour, wipe, restart. It's also great if your machine can do multi filament prints, or you plan on adapting it to do in future (I have 3 independent hot ends on my PB now, two bowden fed and one direct drive to cope with pesky flexible filaments).

The reasons I went with the cheapest chinese printer I could were

1: I wanted to "calibrate" my experience vs the reviews, and opinions on these things found on the internet. You can read yourself to death and suffer from information overload trying to make a choice based on someone elses opinions on things, but I kept getting the feeling I wasn't going to be any happier spending 3 times as much money buying a machine using better "printed" components, and bed leveling sensors but the same basic 8/10mm shafting and ready rod.

2: What I wanted was a package that worked "as is" but something that "I" could improve on with my own ideas. I have planned all along to redesign and rebuild the mechanical aspects of this thing. I'm clueless (but learning) on the electronics and motion control aspect of home hobby cnc's, so buying this working package was a great headstart. I get a laugh out of the prusa bed leveling system and assorted fanfare for it. It measures itself, and compensates for out of level, warp in the bed, and skew in the axis. All I think when I read that was, why not build something stout, square and level in the first place. I'm sure it works great as advertised, I'm not questioning that, but IMO It's a bandaid solution to a problem that shouldn't exist in the first place. Fix the root cause of the problem, don't just turn the radio up....

I am super impressed with the fact that this thing being a cheaply made as it is, works as good as it does. High five to the entire community and people who have designed and evolved this technology to this point. IMO that's an incredible achievement.

Anyway, I have an idea for a 4 colour/filament changer and hot end that I want to design and machine. As well as a complete new frame and axis design. I imagine it will be a long work in progress, and at the end I will have spent much more that the cost of buying a higher end machine. But we all have our own motivation for doing things. I like designing, machining, and making things. The cost of components is pretty cheap, and starting at the bottom there is nowhere to go but up...lol

Dan Dubeau
01-14-2018, 12:30 PM
Video of our LulzBot Minis printing RC car parts.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=22Q35r7QgGs&feature=youtu.be

That's awesome. Just like how our house looked yesterday. Printer going, son at the Lego table playing with Mechano and Lego, daughter at the coffee table building stuff from playdoh, and Lego. Me at the computer designing stuff to be printed. As I said before, what a time to be a kid.

garyhlucas
01-14-2018, 07:22 PM
Grandson has been printing stuff with printer and wanted to design a few things of his own. He had In entor on his computer from school so I gave him a few lessons to get started. This week he had an inventor class he blew through all the examples they were working on quickly so the teacher hooked his laptop to the classroom big screen and had him do one of the examples for the class.

Reverse engineering. I couldn’t get him interested in 3d modeling until he quickly had a way to actually make what he designed! This summer we are going to try lost foam and lost PLA metal casting

I am working on new pump design for my job. The housing is simple welded stainless and the impeller needs to be stainless too. But the big question at the moment is will it actually pump? So I gave him an STL model of the impeller to print for me. Should last long enough to decide whether investing in a stainless one is worthwhile. Pump motor is 3 phase with a VFD so I can be gentle on startup.

MrFluffy
01-15-2018, 05:34 AM
When you do make something, dont forget others might find it useful too. PLA stands up surprisingly well to rc car stresses, better than aged brittle originals anyway.
www.thingiverse.com/thing:529556

Its a great way to get your kids interested in something constructive...
http://gallery.pipandphil.com/Vehicles/workshop/jacques_wheel.jpg
For his jeep, his own wheels...
http://gallery.pipandphil.com/Vehicles/workshop/jacques_wheel_in_flesh.jpg

Family racing. I think only the blackfoot is (fairly) original apart from crash repairs but they all have 1:10th tamiya in the mix..
http://gallery.pipandphil.com/Vehicles/workshop/rc_wackyracers_sm.jpg

MrFluffy
01-15-2018, 06:00 AM
The reasons I went with the cheapest chinese printer I could were

I'm not raining down on your choice here Dan, I went with the printrbot originally because back then, there were no cheap chinese clones. It was either shell out for the printrbot simple metal or the wooden simple, or buy a kit and I just knew it would occupy me building it so much I'd not finish some other things I had in the pipeline, so I just wanted to *buy* a working machine for a change. Plus I kind of liked their open source credentials, and they've been really good. When my first hot end wore out after a year, I tweeted that I was changing to the e3d while I was at it, and brook drum offered me free nozzles for the original even though it was a consumable that had worn out with use.
Over the years I've hacked about on it, adding the heated bed, stretching two of my axis for more travel (longer rods/screws/table etc), changing to a e3d hotend, adding the extra extruders and changing power etc, but they're still add ons I've done myself not original. I keep meaning to build a bigger one, but I can use my cnc mill as a 3d printer with a e3d kraken 3 color mixing hotend in a tool holder for more volume although its *really* slow, so I will probably concentrate on building a laser/plasma table instead as I currently lack that capability unless you count clamping the plasma torch to the cnc mill's table with a big arm off to one side which makes me feel slightly dirty doing.
So, when I say changing filament, I mean, when the urge grabs you, and you figure out how to add multiple extruders to your printer, roll up your sleeves and get it hacked about. You know you want to :-)

Dan Dubeau
01-15-2018, 09:33 AM
A cnc plasma cutter is high on my list of thing I "need" at home. I have a lot of stuff I want to build for the farm, tractor and various other toys, but by the time I get home from work it's too late to go out side and start hacking away at a plate of steel with a jigsaw and angle grinder. A CNC plasma would add much needed precision and capabilities for me.

Too many idea's, projects and stuff, too little time. Your post just gave me another idea about a cat-40 holder for a hot end and extruder I could swap into the haas at work. I have no idea how you'd interface that with the control, above my pay grade, but it would be cool. Typing that just gave me an idea for one for the lathe that I could set in a toolpost for building up rollers, and wheels. Possibilities are endless.

I took the printer downstairs off the kitchen table last night, and will now begin the design process for a new frame and hot end,extruder etc. I got thinking about it last night and had to laugh, there wont be much left of the original when I'm done. I'm almost thinking about leaving it alone, and buying a control board, stepper, etc, and build a new one from scratch. Then I'd have 2 lol. Smoothed out some jitters at work on Friday, so I'm no longer worried about looking for employment for now, so now's the time to spend money for parts.

CCWKen
01-15-2018, 10:15 AM
Perhaps I'm the wrong age but it looks like toys making toys. Every time I watch a 3D printer review or comparison on YT, the guys are making toys. What's with the silly looking boat and some dragon? Does everyone have to print those to see if their printer works? :rolleyes:

I might get interested if someone comes out with a comparably-priced 3D scanner that lets me scan a glued together broken part, create the file then use that file to print it in 3D in an hour or so. I'm with Mr. Pete (YT). Taking 13 hours to print a gear is way too long. I could cast an aluminum blank and machine it in less time. So, it's still just a toy making toys--There is no potential. :cool:

Dan Dubeau
01-15-2018, 10:42 AM
Perhaps I'm the wrong age but it looks like toys making toys. Every time I watch a 3D printer review or comparison on YT, the guys are making toys. What's with the silly looking boat and some dragon? Does everyone have to print those to see if their printer works? :rolleyes:

I might get interested if someone comes out with a comparably-priced 3D scanner that lets me scan a glued together broken part, create the file then use that file to print it in 3D in an hour or so. I'm with Mr. Pete (YT). Taking 13 hours to print a gear is way too long. I could cast an aluminum blank and machine it in less time. So, it's still just a toy making toys--There is no potential. :cool:

I get where you're coming from, because I shared the same viewpoint for the longest time. Still do a little bit. But you just have to adjust your way of thinking. There are a lot of things we make in the shop out of metal, wood, or plastic using conventional methods because that's what we've always done, and the way we've always done it. But do they need to be? Custom tool holders and nests, odd shaped soft jaws, custom guards and shrouds, etc. Another strike against them is surface finish. We're used to nicely molded parts and have that expectation when we hold printed parts that look like crap in comparison. But for a lot of things in the home shop, it just doesn't matter. One project I'll be making shortly is a fan shroud for a solder smoke fan to sit on my bench. I have an old fan, and some carbon filters that I want to put in a stand with a shroud. Ya, it will look like ass compared to a molded one, but it will work, and I made it to fit the objects I have on hand. Custom electrical enclosures is another use foresee.

Another shop use I see is custom dust shrouds for my woodworking tools. My list is rapidly expanding, even as I type, of things I can make for the shop and as a supplement for my other tools. But yeah, it's also a toymaker for the kids as well. :) My boy didn't want to go to school today, he just wanted to stay home and "free dee print stuff".

There is a great number of people in the community who don't actually make anything at all besides test pieces and toys, and tinker with their printers to make them better and make more printers. That's also what put me off for so long too, but once you look past that, and begin to see the usefulness and use them for what they are, and are capable of doing it's going to be just another tool that earns it's keep, all alone by itself while I do other things. That's also what has brought $250 printers to the rest of us, so there is a massive dept owed to those individuals too IMO.

IMO they're usefulness is severely limited if you can't model your own parts. If all you have to go on is stuff people upload to thingiverse, then you get stuck printing dragons, and tugboats. If you can model, you're only limited by your imagination, and budget for filament.

Edit: The cheap scanners are out there too. I've only just begun getting my head around how they work, and what they're capable of, but I'll be adding one to the arsenal here shortly.

MrFluffy
01-15-2018, 11:10 AM
Perhaps I'm the wrong age but it looks like toys making toys. Every time I watch a 3D printer review or comparison on YT, the guys are making toys. What's with the silly looking boat and some dragon? Does everyone have to print those to see if their printer works?

I might get interested if someone comes out with a comparably-priced 3D scanner that lets me scan a glued together broken part, create the file then use that file to print it in 3D in an hour or so. I'm with Mr. Pete (YT). Taking 13 hours to print a gear is way too long. I could cast an aluminum blank and machine it in less time. So, it's still just a toy making toys--There is no potential.


3d printed probe, abs in this case is ideal because its non conductive. I use this to scan with on my bridgeport interact cnc running linuxcnc.
http://gallery.pipandphil.com/Vehicles/workshop/probe3.jpg

Manual carousel for tooling for the bridgeport (since its qc30, *I* am the atc). Anything black came off the printer apart from the coffee machine and the qc30 holders themselves.
http://gallery.pipandphil.com/Vehicles/workshop/tooling_brackets.jpg

Here's the multifix holders on a wall using 3d printed hangers. I've made a 3d printed multifix block to hold a indicator and other low stress activities since.
http://gallery.pipandphil.com/Vehicles/workshop/harrison_toolingholders.jpg

There's parts on my car, my bike, and throughout my house and workshop made on it, and others use 3d printed nests to hold parts to machine etc (I've done that but only for pcb milling). Sure its just toys making toys. Same as my wire edm, the cnc mill, my manual lathe etc. How you use the tool depends on what you need it for and your imagination. The boat is a test of layer alignment and calibration, and quickly shows up if a printer is lacking in accuracy or other issues, which is why you always see it touted as a example.

I think the YT videos on 3d printers are because they are the sort of people bothering to make video's for YT, not because that is what the technology and possibilities define. A lot of YT 3d printer stuff is about getting young people excited, and so the videos tailor to the target audience.

Dan, I was lucky because my control on the bridgeport is linuxCNC, so making it do odd things is much easier. In that case the extruder steppers are just extra axis to define and a dedicated pid controller controls heated bed temps.

MrFluffy
01-15-2018, 11:18 AM
Also for reasonably priced scanner... See the ciclops by BQ, there's a remix of it by someone who fixed the issues in the original product, but the chinese are knocking off copies of the (flawed) original (it has some odd design choices, a bearing for the platter that costs hundreds and can cope with several tons of load etc). I think they run 100-200 dollars now, not sure as I made my own with a generic clone of the controller.
Results, not perfect, not point click slice print anyway. Any photogommetry not connected to a cmm I've tried has noise and dots and geometrically isnt perfect and requires effort in meshlab or similar to clean it up, and I've tried a few different products. I prefer to use my romer cmm arm to replicate a actual piece since I can just sample the key points and bolt hole locations with the ball probe, or if its curved use the mill itself, but for really odd shaped stuff where accuracy and geometry isnt critical and I just want it to look right, this does ok with a bit of effort cleaning up the model. Now if only I can find that elusive matrox/perceptron interface box to hook the perceptron scanner up to my romer arm...
Image before the final platform was machined (because I'm a cheapskate, I cut it out of a kitchen cutting board in nylon on the bridgeport instead of buying theirs)
http://gallery.pipandphil.com/Vehicles/workshop/ciclops_front.jpg

bq's link.
http://diwo.bq.com/en/presentacion-ciclop-horus/

Dan Dubeau
01-15-2018, 11:34 AM
Dan, I was lucky because my control on the bridgeport is linuxCNC, so making it do odd things is much easier. In that case the extruder steppers are just extra axis to define and a dedicated pid controller controls heated bed temps.

Cool. This whole world of home built CNC is new to me and very interesting. I have lots to learn. I've dipped my toes into it at various times over the years, so I kind of have a general idea of all the different bits and pieces and control software's, but not much more than that. I've always had access to industrial equipment I could use whenever I wanted (when it wasn't running other stuff) so I never really bothered. I've got a shop full of manual equipment at home but I can see that changing in the next few years, as my kids get older and want to get into building stuff more and more. A cnc plasma will be my first, as that would fill the biggest hole in my capabilities.

I know I'm starting to sound like Ron Popeil regarding this printer, and I'm sorry lol. But it does slice....;)

RB211
01-15-2018, 12:12 PM
AND when things go bad, they REALLY go bad....
https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20180115/d6fc7e460d05395ea8418ce49b5ac2e1.jpg

I got a Thermal Runaway error while printing a few weeks ago. Today I decided to fix the mess. Also got a min temp error message, turned out a thermistor wire on the head broke, which maybe had some thing to do with the whole mess to begin with. No more error messages, recalibrating, going back to ABS.
Had to use my SMD hot air rework station to painstakingly remove bits of the glob. Without it I would of bad to bypass the failsafes to heat up the head. Hope you donít have to go through this, even with decent tools!

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro

MrFluffy
01-15-2018, 12:23 PM
AND when things go bad, they REALLY go bad....

I got a Thermal Runaway error while printing a few weeks ago. Today I decided to fix the mess. Also got a min temp error message, turned out a thermistor wire on the head broke, which maybe had some thing to do with the whole mess to begin with. No more error messages, recalibrating, going back to ABS.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro

On a similar vein, this is the remains of the first heated bed controller "relay" I ran, it set fire to the main printer wiring loom underneath around it, but fortunately I was eating lunch in the next room and it stank enough to grab my attention and get it controlled before it spread into other fuel sources. It was a open hardware design rather than chinese no name ssr, but un-heat sinked and the pictures went back and about then they mentioned that it needed heatsinking, so now they have it in the documentation that it needs it.
I replaced it with the same design, but I located it inside a diecast alu project box on the side of the printer and used the box as a heatsink also. So if it ever does let go again, it will not have anything to spread to, but its been fine since. But things catch fire, I wouldn't sleep in a house where one ran overnight or long duration without fire alarms and lots of consideration. So yes, safety matters.
http://gallery.pipandphil.com/Vehicles/workshop/relay_fire1.jpg

RichR
01-15-2018, 12:25 PM
... Every time I watch a 3D printer review or comparison on YT, the guys are making toys. ...
If you read some of the posts in this thread you may see other uses.


... So, it's still just a toy making toys--There is no potential. :cool:
Then I guess you missed the post where MrFluffy used it as design aid:
http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/threads/75336-3d-printer-recommendations?p=1154890#post1154890

And then there is this:

Grandson has been printing stuff with printer and wanted to design a few things of his own. He had Inventor on his computer from school so I gave him a few lessons to get started. This week he had an inventor class he blew through all the examples they were working on quickly so the teacher hooked his laptop to the classroom big screen and had him do one of the examples for the class.

Reverse engineering. I couldnít get him interested in 3d modeling until he quickly had a way to actually make what he designed! This summer we are going to try lost foam and lost PLA metal casting

I am working on new pump design for my job. The housing is simple welded stainless and the impeller needs to be stainless too. But the big question at the moment is will it actually pump? So I gave him an STL model of the impeller to print for me. Should last long enough to decide whether investing in a stainless one is worthwhile. Pump motor is 3 phase with a VFD so I can be gentle on startup.
We have a grandson learning CAD and 3D modeling plus a piece of a pump being printed up for a proof of concept test. Yeah, no potential there.

RB211
01-15-2018, 12:43 PM
What I am doing right now is just for toys, a Lego Train track adapter, to connect old 4.5v tracks to 9v tracks.
Iíve also printed ABS landing gear for my r/c airplanes, purposely taking advantage of the flex in ABS, and have printed gear for other club members, and motor mounts, control horns, etc.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro

Dan Dubeau
01-15-2018, 12:46 PM
The fire hazard is a big concern of mine, and why I won't run it unattended. The concerns with my board are they run full current for the heatbed, and hot end through the main board, and that's a big potential for problems. I have some mosfet relays en route to alleviate that problem. I've also thought about building a full fire proof enclosure so that I can run it unattended with less worry.

A toy, yes, in comparison to better ones for sure. But I'm actually surprised at how usefull this toy is, and will be.

Casting patterns is another use for which it will be great to have, and one I had in mind when I bought it.

RichR
01-15-2018, 12:48 PM
... Also got a min temp error message, turned out a thermistor wire on the head broke, which maybe had some thing to do with the whole mess to begin with. ...

It's too bad they don't monitor the thermistor with an A/D converter and computer. Then they could detect that the wire opened (or shorted) because
then the reading should go beyond a sensible value and the computer could shut down the printer.

CCWKen
01-15-2018, 01:56 PM
A fire is certainly at the top of my concerns. But I can't see babysitting a print job that takes 13 hours either. I don't think I could stay awake for 13 hours at a time. :)

They need to do some improving on print time and safety for me to consider it.

RB211
01-15-2018, 03:25 PM
Iíll be damned, first Lego piece I printed with ABS, and works perfectly!!!
https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20180115/6f588b9ca53f85d1d753203569f9bb07.jpg


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro

Dan Dubeau
01-15-2018, 04:30 PM
Awesome. I can see some custom lego pieces in my future. I doubt my machine right now would print a usable piece, but never know, I should try one to see. I can see some custom pieces to morph different building toys together like lego, mechano, and knex.

KJ1I
01-15-2018, 04:52 PM
What's with the silly looking boat and some dragon? Does everyone have to print those to see if their printer works?

As a matter of fact, yes. The "silly looking boat" is designed to test the capabilities of the printer. Printing it helps you determine if your printer is set up correctly - bed leveled, temperatures set for the particular filament, slicing parameters, etc., etc., etc.

RB211
01-15-2018, 07:45 PM
Gears... How about Lego gears? I had my doubts about this print but was pleasantly surprised. I also updated the firmware of the control board, maybe it helped too.
https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20180116/4f6f29f859c9f28c5e73a7f4797d9a8b.jpg


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro

garyhlucas
01-15-2018, 08:40 PM
That pump impeller is a really good example. I found a pump that will work for us but that type pump is only made in small sizes and produces 30 times more pressure than we need or that is safe. I spoke to company about what it might cost to upsize their pump for our needs and they said figure about $50,000 in development costs! I’ve done enough product development to have give that kind of number to plenty of customers who think engineering a new product is cheap.

For my pump concept test I bought a pump motor off Ebay for $75, a mechanical seal for $25. A pair of sanitary flange fittings and a clamp for $50, and one piece of stainless pipe for $20. A couple hours of CNC machining, an hour of Tig welding and that printed impeller and I can test my pump concept. If it works I can start the wheels rolling on a patent while I make a welded stainless or investment cast impeller for testing at a job site. So I can easily justify BUYING the printer just for this test!

I didn’t buy the printer because this is one of my stealth projects my boss doesn’t know about. In my career all my best ideas have gotten me in trouble. At my last job I came up with a pump stand that really pissed off my boss, it’s all they use now. A simple idea I had while starting up a plant I was absolutely don’t try that. The next another engineer blew up another job because he DID’T do it!

At this job I suggested building a filter and was told to forget it. When the one we were using was a total failure I already had my design done and it is used in every system we build. I wanted better data collection but a sampler was $12k. I was told not to bother but the sampler I built from a chinese 3020 router has proven invaluable and we are even thinking of selling them.

I’ll bet we have a company printer shortly, because I am going to buy it. Better to ask forgiveness than to ask permission!

garyhlucas
01-16-2018, 07:10 PM
Grandson surprised me yesterday. He was off from school so he printed out the motor fan cover I modeled in SW for the motor on our CNC mill. Took 9 hours and came out very nice! He is going to print that pump impeller over the weekend. He is also getting ready to a belt guard for the CNC. I know, all toys.

The difference between men and boys is the price of their toys.

RB211
01-19-2018, 02:49 AM
I just ordered the upgrade kit for my Prusa i3 mk2s, to bring it up to a 2.5. Adds in a flexible magnetic powder coated PEI build plate, temp sensor on the leveling probe so it can adjust accordingly to different build plate temps(fixes temperature drift), and a filament sensor that detects issues with the filament feed.
Also ordered a roll of Esun PETG natural color. Supposed to be a good in between of PLA and ABS.

Jon Heron
01-19-2018, 08:08 AM
Not sure if your aware but there was a problem with the coating on the first batch. They are expecting to get in the new shipment around the end of the month. https://www.prusaprinters.org/mk3-is-shipping/#_ga=2.260495045.917600061.1515943452-1220603950.1505347321
Mine should be shipping towards the end of February, looking forward to it!
Cheers,
Jon

Dan Dubeau
01-19-2018, 08:42 AM
I just ordered the upgrade kit for my Prusa i3 mk2s, to bring it up to a 2.5. Adds in a flexible magnetic powder coated PEI build plate, temp sensor on the leveling probe so it can adjust accordingly to different build plate temps(fixes temperature drift), and a filament sensor that detects issues with the filament feed.
Also ordered a roll of Esun PETG natural color. Supposed to be a good in between of PLA and ABS.

I bought a roll of red Translucent Petg. Bought Wednesday around 14:00 off amazon and it was sitting on my porch when I came home from work Thursday night. I don't even have Prime. Should be fun to play around with making tail lenses, if it works ok. Been hesitant to run my printer without my relay for the bed heater hooked up, but I have a couple longer run prints tee'd up for the weekend. If it catches fire at least I'll be around lol

Also ordered a bunch of mechanical parts to make another one. Should be a fun build.

RB211
01-19-2018, 08:52 AM
Not sure if your aware but there was a problem with the coating on the first batch. They are expecting to get in the new shipment around the end of the month. https://www.prusaprinters.org/mk3-is-shipping/#_ga=2.260495045.917600061.1515943452-1220603950.1505347321
Mine should be shipping towards the end of February, looking forward to it!
Cheers,
Jon
End of March for me... Bummer!


I bought a roll of red Translucent Petg. Bought Wednesday around 14:00 off amazon and it was sitting on my porch when I came home from work Thursday night. I don't even have Prime. Should be fun to play around with making tail lenses, if it works ok. Been hesitant to run my printer without my relay for the bed heater hooked up, but I have a couple longer run prints tee'd up for the weekend. If it catches fire at least I'll be around lol

Also ordered a bunch of mechanical parts to make another one. Should be a fun build.

How does the temp get regulated without a relay to turn it on and off?

Dan Dubeau
01-19-2018, 09:17 AM
End of March for me... Bummer!



How does the temp get regulated without a relay to turn it on and off?

All the power for the heated bed, and hotend get routed through the main board. For lower temps it's not a problem, but for higher bed temps it's a serious issue. The common fix/workaround is to install a mosfet relay to divert the current from the main board. Guys have taken it a step farther and added separate power supplies solely for the hot end and bed. I'm not going that far (yet), but I'd be a lot more comfortable leaving my printer to run overnight knowing that current was running through relays as opposed to the board.

ikdor
01-19-2018, 10:51 AM
As the new prusa runs on double the voltage, the current switching becomes much safer. Theoretically the board heating goes down by 75%.

mattthemuppet
01-19-2018, 11:41 AM
I'll be interested to hear some feedback on PETG, I've read alot of good things about it. Unfortunately I read them after I ordered a kilo of ABS..

I added a 60mm fan to my Cetus hotend to replace the 40mm screamer. Much quieter and more pleasant sound now :)

RB211
01-19-2018, 12:55 PM
I'll be interested to hear some feedback on PETG, I've read alot of good things about it. Unfortunately I read them after I ordered a kilo of ABS..

I added a 60mm fan to my Cetus hotend to replace the 40mm screamer. Much quieter and more pleasant sound now :)
Cetus does not have a heated build plate, how do you plan on using the ABS?

elf
01-19-2018, 04:16 PM
Cetus does not have a heated build plate, how do you plan on using the ABS?
Blue painters tape

mattthemuppet
01-19-2018, 04:23 PM
Cetus does not have a heated build plate, how do you plan on using the ABS?

they do, it's an optional ($40) extra. I bought it with the printer in anticipation of printing ABS :)

through the printer it'll get to 60C, if you want higher (100C) you need to add an external power brick directly to the bed circuit. There are connections in place for this, but I haven't gotten to that point. I'm not sure 60C will be enough for ABS, so we'll have to see. I also need to make some kind of rudimentary enclosure for the printer to print ABS and stick a desklamp with a 60W incandescent (glad I didn't recycle them yet) in there for heating. No real time to play with it right now though.

RB211
01-19-2018, 04:25 PM
they do, it's an optional ($40) extra. I bought it with the printer in anticipation of printing ABS :)

through the printer it'll get to 60C, if you want higher (100C) you need to add an external power brick directly to the bed circuit. There are connections in place for this, but I haven't gotten to that point. I'm not sure 60C will be enough for ABS, so we'll have to see. I also need to make some kind of rudimentary enclosure for the printer to print ABS and stick a desklamp with a 60W incandescent (glad I didn't recycle them yet) in there for heating. No real time to play with it right now though.

You’ll want 100-110 c

elf
01-19-2018, 10:48 PM
60C is good for PLA. I use 128C for the first layer of ABS and gradually lower it to 105C. My print surface is PrintBite which needs 10C to 15C higher temperatures for the first layer to stick.

I doubt a light bulb will give you enough heat :(

mattthemuppet
01-20-2018, 02:30 PM
hmm, thanks for the feedback you two.

there's a 3rd party heated bed controller on eBay for ~$30 that would be worth looking into then as it uses a thermocouple and external power source to maintain a set temperature. The heated bed on the Cetus is either 60C (internal power) or 100C (external power) with no adjustments possible.

How do you all heat your enclosures for ABS printing? I would have thought a 60 or 100W incandescent would be enough in a small volume, say 18"x18"x30", especially with the heated bed adding to the temperature.

RB211
01-20-2018, 02:35 PM
hmm, thanks for the feedback you two.

there's a 3rd party heated bed controller on eBay for ~$30 that would be worth looking into then as it uses a thermocouple and external power source to maintain a set temperature. The heated bed on the Cetus is either 60C (internal power) or 100C (external power) with no adjustments possible.

How do you all heat your enclosures for ABS printing? I would have thought a 60 or 100W incandescent would be enough in a small volume, say 18"x18"x30", especially with the heated bed adding to the temperature.

I donít use an enclosure, just try to keep the air around the machine still. Also do not use the print cooling fan.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro

Paul Alciatore
01-20-2018, 03:56 PM
Thanks for that. I had wondered.




Weed trimmer nylon works fairly well and is quite inexpensive.