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The Metal Butcher
06-14-2018, 12:37 PM
Hi all.

I've started in on restoring one of these drill presses and thought I might document the process. You see a lot of these restored but not many documented. If you're interested, come along for the ride. I'm sure I'll have some questions as well.

https://i.imgur.com/T0KNuhH.jpg
https://i.imgur.com/Gvimsyt.jpg
https://i.imgur.com/GwKfufB.jpg


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tPXlYpe31-8

More pictures at the end of the video.

3 Phase Lightbulb
06-14-2018, 12:47 PM
Looks very compact and portable. Does it come with any accessories like a fork lift? :)

jmm03
06-14-2018, 08:09 PM
Welcome, great post. These restoration posts are my favorite, looking forward to seeing it progress. Jim

Fasttrack
06-15-2018, 08:51 AM
Welcome to the forum! You should find some good information on Babbitt bearings here: https://play.google.com/store/books/details?id=knI-AQAAMAAJ&rdid=book-knI-AQAAMAAJ&rdot=1

Tapered Babbitt bearings are discussed as an "alternative" means of wear compensation (compared to split bearings where shims would be removed). In the vertical orientation, the adjustment is automatic.

Royldean
06-15-2018, 09:06 AM
tried to find info on Royersford. Are they out of Royersford, PA? That town is only a few miles from me.

ken
06-15-2018, 10:05 AM
Royersford made the 21" drill press into the 1970's the later ones had had ball bearing on all the shafts. and they were still around 5 or so years ago. Ken

wdtom44
06-15-2018, 10:38 AM
Welcome,
You are lucky to have found such a nice old machine. Am enjoying the video as I type.
' Tom

Royldean
06-15-2018, 12:49 PM
tried to find info on Royersford. Are they out of Royersford, PA? That town is only a few miles from me.

Answering my own question. I actually used the google machine on the internet box and concluded that yes, they are indeed out of "Rofo", and have a foundry in Phoenixville, PA (a little farther down the road).

The Metal Butcher
06-15-2018, 03:35 PM
Looks very compact and portable. Does it come with any accessories like a fork lift? :)

Ha no, but do notice the backhoe in the background. It was very well needed for getting it off the truck. :)


Welcome to the forum! You should find some good information on Babbitt bearings here: https://play.google.com/store/books/details?id=knI-AQAAMAAJ&rdid=book-knI-AQAAMAAJ&rdot=1

Tapered Babbitt bearings are discussed as an "alternative" means of wear compensation (compared to split bearings where shims would be removed). In the vertical orientation, the adjustment is automatic.

Ah thank you. I'll definitely give that a look! This is the first time I've touched a machine with babbitts, so they are very new to me. I'm studying mechanical engineering right now, and seeing all these old mechanisms is just awesome. An automatic wear compensating bearing... I dunno that I would have ever come up with that. Much like the stuff I learn in class, I tuck things away in my "toolbox" so to speak, and I'm sure in the future the knowledge gained from fixing old machinery will come in handy designing new machinery.

The split babbitt bearings used wooden shims and were not tightened down. Should I look into replacing these with a metal shim stack, or just run them?


Royersford made the 21" drill press into the 1970's the later ones had had ball bearing on all the shafts. and they were still around 5 or so years ago. Ken

I knew they made them for a while, but I didn't know they lived that long. They switched to V belts as opposed the flat belts in the early 50s, so I assume this is before then.


Welcome,
You are lucky to have found such a nice old machine. Am enjoying the video as I type.
' Tom

Thanks. I had part two uploading overnight, but something caused it to fail. I'm reuploading right now. Should be out tonight.

Ohio Mike
06-15-2018, 07:01 PM
That's a very nice restoration candidate you have. I have one that I went thru a few years ago and it was much more work. Mine came direct from military surplus and pretty sad off. It had broken handles, teeth missing on gears and the bracket that holds the table to the column was broken too.

The Metal Butcher
06-15-2018, 10:29 PM
That's a very nice restoration candidate you have. I have one that I went thru a few years ago and it was much more work. Mine came direct from military surplus and pretty sad off. It had broken handles, teeth missing on gears and the bracket that holds the table to the column was broken too.

That's a shame. At least you were able to do it proper. Any pictures of the restoration? I can see the table one, if you don't clamp the upper clamp it could be easily broken. We got some drills with ours and multiple of the drills had been removed with pipe wrenches, resulting in one having it's tang snapped off. It seems like people have no common sense sometimes.

--


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zZ88AtU_L08

wdtom44
06-16-2018, 09:36 AM
" It seems like people have no common sense sometimes."


I have determined that there are some people who should not be allowed to operate or be around machines. They can't "understand" them or "make friends" with them.

--


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zZ88AtU_L08[/QUOTE]

J Tiers
06-16-2018, 10:40 AM
" It seems like people have no common sense sometimes."


I have determined that there are some people who should not be allowed to operate or be around machines. They can't "understand" them or "make friends" with them.

--



Some just have no decent sense of mechanical stuff.... the "if I push this, it will move like that" sort of thing.

Ohio Mike
06-16-2018, 11:55 AM
That's a shame. At least you were able to do it proper. Any pictures of the restoration? I can see the table one, if you don't clamp the upper clamp it could be easily broken. We got some drills with ours and multiple of the drills had been removed with pipe wrenches, resulting in one having it's tang snapped off. It seems like people have no common sense sometimes.


I do have a few, I never got around to posting them here. Pretty sure they're over on the PM site. The power feed was a mess too.


http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/attachment.php?attachmentid=3227&d=1529164195

http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/attachment.php?attachmentid=3226&d=1529164195

Ohio Mike
06-16-2018, 12:08 PM
Two common things with these drills are missing or broken quill stop and a missing or broken elevation handle. Here's a photo I snapped of the proper handle on a drill that was for sale.

http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/attachment.php?attachmentid=3228&d=1529165223

J Tiers
06-16-2018, 12:11 PM
I looked up Royersford Foundry and Machine. They seem to do pillow blocks and other things now, and may have moved at least some operations to Phoenixville PA. No mention of drill presses, but they seem to make arbor presses.

https://www.thomasnet.com/profile/00135050/royersford-foundry-machine-co-inc.html

http://www.royersford.com/

The Metal Butcher
06-16-2018, 01:16 PM
I do have a few, I never got around to posting them here. Pretty sure they're over on the PM site. The power feed was a mess too.


snip


That's a beaut! You even got new leather belts. I'm afraid I'm going to have to get some rubber coated canvas ones, leather is about 10x more expensive. I've tried posting on PM but it seems like too many snooty CNC guys that have to do everything as fast as possible or it's not worth doing.

Lemme ask you something. Did you remove the column from the cast piece that bolts on to the base, or did you leave it? I don't mind leaving mine on so bad, but it's slightly out of alignment, and it it's not to hard I'd like to fix it. Seems like a slip fit that has gotten crusty over the years?


Two common things with these drills are missing or broken quill stop and a missing or broken elevation handle. Here's a photo I snapped of the proper handle on a drill that was for sale.

snip

My quill stop is intact, but I guess the handle has been replaced as it doesn't look like that. No biggie. Interesting belt tensioner they added as well.

The Metal Butcher
06-16-2018, 01:26 PM
I do have a few, I never got around to posting them here. Pretty sure they're over on the PM site. The power feed was a mess too.

snip

That's a beaut! And you even got new leather belts. I'm afraid I'm going to have to go with rubber coated cavas, leather is 10x the price on mcmaster. I've tried posting some on PM but it seems like a bunch of snooty CNC guys that have to do everything as fast as possible or it's not worth doing.


Lemme ask you something. When you restored yours, did you remove the cast piece that bolts the column to the base? If so, how did you do so? I assume it's a slip fit that has gotten crusty over the years, and it looks like it's solidly attached at the top. I could leave it, but it would make it easier to clean the column, and it's out of alignment by a degree or so.


Two common things with these drills are missing or broken quill stop and a missing or broken elevation handle. Here's a photo I snapped of the proper handle on a drill that was for sale.

snip

I've got an intact quill stop, but the handle is different. No biggie. Interesting belt tensioning system they employed there, I guess that would take care of belt stretch.

Mcgyver
06-16-2018, 02:37 PM
I do have a few, I never got around to posting them here. Pretty sure they're over on the PM site. The power feed was a mess too.



great looking machine, nice work.

Doc Nickel
06-16-2018, 03:04 PM
That's a beaut! And you even got new leather belts. I'm afraid I'm going to have to go with rubber coated cavas, leather is 10x the price on mcmaster.

-Where are you getting your belts? I have a Rockford drill I've been meaning to fix up...

Doc.

The Metal Butcher
06-16-2018, 03:21 PM
-Where are you getting your belts? I have a Rockford drill I've been meaning to fix up...

Doc.

As said, looking at McMaster-Carr at the moment. Search for flat belts.

Ohio Mike
06-16-2018, 04:18 PM
If you want leather I would suggest John Knox or Al Bino. I got mine from John.

John Knox
http://www.leatherdrivebelts.com

Al Bino
https://albinoindustrialbelting.com

Ohio Mike
06-16-2018, 04:28 PM
Lemme ask you something. When you restored yours, did you remove the cast piece that bolts the column to the base? If so, how did you do so? I assume it's a slip fit that has gotten crusty over the years, and it looks like it's solidly attached at the top. I could leave it, but it would make it easier to clean the column, and it's out of alignment by a degree or so.


Yes I had the base separated from the column bracket and the column removed also. I had to because I replaced casting F19 the table bracket. Luckily I found someone with a parts machine. As I recall you have to remove the bolts and a large bolt going up into the column from the bottom. It was not difficult to come apart as I recall.

The Metal Butcher
06-16-2018, 09:55 PM
Yes I had the base separated from the column bracket and the column removed also. I had to because I replaced casting F19 the table bracket. Luckily I found someone with a parts machine. As I recall you have to remove the bolts and a large bolt going up into the column from the bottom. It was not difficult to come apart as I recall.


Ok, thanks. I got the bolt out, but I still think I'll need a puller.

reggie_obe
06-17-2018, 12:57 PM
If you want leather I would suggest John Knox or Al Bino. I got mine from John.

John Knox
http://www.leatherdrivebelts.com

Al Bino
https://albinoindustrialbelting.com

Or Baltimore Belting: http://baltimorebelting.com/

Northernsinger
06-17-2018, 10:54 PM
I was raised in the local area, my family had two of these--they were the medium drill presses (the larger was a Sibley) in the Philadelphia shop--and I bought them both when the business closed in 1985, then brought them up here to Vermont.

I've been to Royersford--just up the river--a few times, as recently as last year. The company is in business but--for liability reasons, i think--does not wish to discuss this former product. They made a lot of them, for many years.

Perhaps some one could tell me how to attach photographs from my pictures--I might have a few of these. Indeed, i think I have one I snapped of one of my two machines in the old shop in 1969. Thank you.

Ohio Mike
06-24-2018, 02:07 PM
I was raised in the local area, my family had two of these--they were the medium drill presses (the larger was a Sibley) in the Philadelphia shop--and I bought them both when the business closed in 1985, then brought them up here to Vermont.

I've been to Royersford--just up the river--a few times, as recently as last year. The company is in business but--for liability reasons, i think--does not wish to discuss this former product. They made a lot of them, for many years.

Perhaps some one could tell me how to attach photographs from my pictures--I might have a few of these. Indeed, i think I have one I snapped of one of my two machines in the old shop in 1969. Thank you.

Paul outlines the steps pretty well in this thread.
http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/threads/74147-Posting-Photos-With-This-Board-s-Hosting-Service-The-Short-Strokes

Northernsinger
06-25-2018, 06:54 PM
Thank you for the uploading tip. I just fiddled around for quite awhile and just haven't quite got it. The photographs of Royersfords will have to be unseen for now.

The Metal Butcher
08-08-2018, 05:42 PM
Hi all. Wow, no updates for over a month. Sorry about that. I had stalled out a bit, but I'm getting back at it again. Should be the first bits of paint going on in just a few days. I'm working on a video, hopefully it will be out by next Thursday.

I've also got a few questions.

1.) Most all of the castings seem to have "F 49" on them. I'm wondering if this is the 49th unit of the F batch, or the F batch of the 49th year. I'm thinking the latter. It would be really cool to know what year it was made, and that does seem pretty logical. It was a later model to have all the goodies, but also before they went to V belts in the mid 50s.

2.) The castings were painted with a very tough black primer that I intend to leave. (Not sure if I could take it off if I wanted to.) I intend to brush paint the majority of the castings, and I don't like to use primer. Should I just paint it and call it a day, or should I use something like etch-n-prep first? Or something else entirely?

3.) Any opinions on open gear lubrication? They make open gear lubricants for outdoor applications, but they are thick nasty grease that I've basically been spending weeks scraping off everything. I'm thinking something a bit lightweight that won't hold shop grit so bad. I have way oil, but that seems a bit thin. Any suggestions?

Thanks all,
MB

P.S. Here is a teaser. Column looks brand new. No rust pitting at all. Guess the grease tube they used up slathering everything paid off.

http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/attachment.php?attachmentid=3421&d=1533764458

(Wow it is a pain hosting photos here)

Ohio Mike
08-08-2018, 07:43 PM
I would leave the black, clean and paint with a quality trim brush. I used Sherwin Williams, nothing fancy. Its it covers well, wets out nice and drys fast. And I don't mind the smell. If you have guards etc on a machine those can often be done with a mini foam roller. I don't like to spray it makes such a mess and you really need to wear a mask. Oh I also don't usually tape anymore. Paint small parts with a 3/4 or 1 inch artist brush from a craft store. I carry a rag and wipe off any thing where paint shouldn't be.

Edit: I used Mobil Vactra 4 way oil on mine but I don't use it much since I got the 22 inch Buffalo.

wierdscience
08-08-2018, 08:28 PM
The best modern open gear lube I have used is made by CRC-

https://www.grainger.com/product/1HBK7?cm_mmc=PPC:+Google+PLA&s_kwcid=AL!2966!3!166591268592!!!g!392080792495!&ef_id=W2RS9wAAAGaPb2vT:20180809002453:s

I have also used "black oil" which is heavy way lube with powdered graphite added,but it's a bit nasty to use on something like your drill press.

I have also heard of people using straight parrafin wax as well,never tried it though.

Good job on the drill press so far!

The Metal Butcher
08-08-2018, 10:08 PM
I would leave the black, clean and paint with a quality trim brush. I used Sherwin Williams, nothing fancy. Its it covers well, wets out nice and drys fast. And I don't mind the smell. If you have guards etc on a machine those can often be done with a mini foam roller. I don't like to spray it makes such a mess and you really need to wear a mask. Oh I also don't usually tape anymore. Paint small parts with a 3/4 or 1 inch artist brush from a craft store. I carry a rag and wipe off any thing where paint shouldn't be.

Edit: I used Mobil Vactra 4 way oil on mine but I don't use it much since I got the 22 inch Buffalo.

Alright, thanks. I'm going to paint most of the parts with a brush. The guards and handles will be an accent color, and rattle-canned.

I have #2 vactra, but it's pretty thin. I googled it, and #2 is about like 20 weight oil, and #4 50 weight. Sounds like the right stuff. I can't justify a jug of it right now, so for the limited amount I'll use it, I'll probably just use #2.


The best modern open gear lube I have used is made by CRC-

https://www.grainger.com/product/1HBK7?cm_mmc=PPC:+Google+PLA&s_kwcid=AL!2966!3!166591268592!!!g!392080792495!&ef_id=W2RS9wAAAGaPb2vT:20180809002453:s

I have also used "black oil" which is heavy way lube with powdered graphite added,but it's a bit nasty to use on something like your drill press.

I have also heard of people using straight parrafin wax as well,never tried it though.

Good job on the drill press so far!


Yeah, I saw that stuff but it seems like something I want to avoid. I'd imagine that's for stuff like gears somewhere in a sawmill where it gets greased once every never, runs all day, and is covered in grime. Also, I don't want any grease that comes in a spray bottle. :O It would take all day to clean up the overspray. This machine will be lubed before every use, but I don't want something that just runs off the gears everytime I leave it for a week. It gets wasteful quick having to re-wet everything.

The Metal Butcher
09-10-2018, 01:20 AM
1.) Most all of the castings seem to have "F 49" on them. I'm wondering if this is the 49th unit of the F batch, or the F batch of the 49th year. I'm thinking the latter. It would be really cool to know what year it was made, and that does seem pretty logical. It was a later model to have all the goodies, but also before they went to V belts in the mid 50s.)

Or... it could be the part number. Derp.

Mike, I noticed when my column was apart that the part that slid into the base had been sleeved. Do you remember if yours was like that? I'm wondering if someone accidentally blew the tolerance and had to turn it down more and sleeve it. If so, good on them for saving the casting.

--

Video is edited and ready. Finally. It will be live tomorrow 0600 Eastern time. I'll give you a sneak peak of how it's looking currently.

http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/attachment.php?attachmentid=3548&d=1536556714
http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/attachment.php?attachmentid=3549&d=1536556721

If you're interested in updates on other projects, they'll be on my instagram. https://www.instagram.com/the_metal_butcher/

The Metal Butcher
09-10-2018, 11:32 AM
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DTQXCGLaHVw

Arcane
09-10-2018, 05:17 PM
Kudos for a job well done!

dmartin
09-10-2018, 07:06 PM
Looking good, thanks for taking the time to post the progress. It looks like a nice band saw that you have. What brand is that?

Ohio Mike
09-10-2018, 07:31 PM
Mike, I noticed when my column was apart that the part that slid into the base had been sleeved. Do you remember if yours was like that? I'm wondering if someone accidentally blew the tolerance and had to turn it down more and sleeve it. If so, good on them for saving the casting.

I don't recall it being like that. Looking good. :cool:

oxford
09-10-2018, 07:54 PM
I don’t know how well of a lube it would be for open gears but maybe look at some motorcycle chain lube. A lot of them are formulated to prevent flinging off.

The Metal Butcher
09-10-2018, 10:10 PM
Kudos for a job well done!

Thanks! Although the job is far from done.

Looking good, thanks for taking the time to post the progress. It looks like a nice band saw that you have. What brand is that?

It's a Grob 4V-24. We didn't want one that big but the price is right. Still working on some kinks with smaller blades. It does have a 4 speed gearbox though.

I don't recall it being like that. Looking good. :cool:

Aha! I'm betting someone dun goofed at the factory, as some old timer had to come over and show him how to fix it. Doesn't bother me.

I don’t know how well of a lube it would be for open gears but maybe look at some motorcycle chain lube. A lot of them are formulated to prevent flinging off.

That might be a good idea. Maybe some chainsaw oil, that's some sticky stuff.

Ohio Mike
09-11-2018, 05:03 PM
I suspect a large number of these drills originated during WW-II. Mine came direct from Military Surplus about 6 years ago. Every maker had different build qualities but mine sure seems pretty rough (war finish?) and it included what I'm sure is an original Westinghouse oil bearing motor of that era.

The Metal Butcher
02-23-2019, 11:30 PM
I suspect a large number of these drills originated during WW-II. Mine came direct from Military Surplus about 6 years ago. Every maker had different build qualities but mine sure seems pretty rough (war finish?) and it included what I'm sure is an original Westinghouse oil bearing motor of that era.

It wouldn't surprise me if the GE on mine was original. It sure looks the part. Big gits on each end, but I haven't taken it apart yet to look at it. That's still to come. I do have a small update, not much, but it's been 5 months so I figured I ought to post something.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XTcEbrJv3iE

Now I've got to braze up the back-gear shaft and machine it back, then get the motor ready, make some bearing spacers and order some belts. The flatbelt pullies were all cleaned up off camera; my dad did most of the work on those. I was hoping to have them blasted but ended up just going with a needle scale and rust-converter. They look good though. I'll try to grab a picture before long.

-------------

I've had a lot of fellas asking about the quill stop, so I modeled it in CAD and made a drawing. Send people the permalink to this post or to the google drive link if you see someone looking for information on one. Currently I have the little bugger removed as it's hellaciously in the way and limits quill travel from 7" to about 4". I may put it back in if I start doing a lot of repetitive work where I want to walk away and leave the drill.

https://drive.google.com/open?id=1gzXqIKg7UvdXs9uwliRDZJkYl0HkJTfu

http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/attachment.php?attachmentid=4712&d=1550982469
http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/attachment.php?attachmentid=4711&d=1550982467
http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/attachment.php?attachmentid=4710&d=1550982460

CCWKen
02-24-2019, 10:05 AM
Orange, green, blue...? Are you painting that thing for a Kindergarten class? :cool:

The Metal Butcher
02-24-2019, 08:05 PM
No green. Just orange, blue, and black.

I was inspired by this Kindergarten trike:

https://s.aolcdn.com/dims-global/dims3/GLOB/legacy_thumbnail/350x197/quality/95/https://s.blogcdn.com/slideshows/images/slides/740/598/8/S7405988/slug/l/2019-ford-gt-heritage-edition-03-1.jpg

You're always welcome to paint yours whatever color you like. ;)

wdtom44
02-25-2019, 08:52 AM
I kinda like a machine painted in bright colors. Why does everything have to be grey? Certainly if you want it to be other than grey it is your machine and if painting it you can have it any color you want. Go for it!

wdtom44
02-25-2019, 09:02 AM
If you haven't got belts yet or for others looking for belts. Some years ago before I retired I needed to replace a belt on an old turret lathe at work and found in McMaster some kind of vinyl belting that worked very well for years. It was orange in color and they had clips for it that you could just squeeze on with a vise if I remember right. I don't recall it ever stretching and if oil got on it you could just clean it off with a rag and maybe a little gentle solvent.

jmm03
02-25-2019, 03:42 PM
I agree with Tom on the paint scheme, I like to see machines in different colors myself, breaks up the monotony... (I wondered what happened to you, projects do have a way of getting side tracked unfortunately) at least you are making progress. Jim

The Metal Butcher
02-25-2019, 05:33 PM
If you haven't got belts yet or for others looking for belts. Some years ago before I retired I needed to replace a belt on an old turret lathe at work and found in McMaster some kind of vinyl belting that worked very well for years. It was orange in color and they had clips for it that you could just squeeze on with a vise if I remember right. I don't recall it ever stretching and if oil got on it you could just clean it off with a rag and maybe a little gentle solvent.

Hi Tom,

Are you talking about this Orange stuff here in the flat-belt section? That stuff is Polyurethane, I don't know if it's the same material you are thinking of but it's quite a bit too pricey, and only available in 1/16th of an inch. We used some of that for the 24" Grob bandsaw tires and it's definitely nice stuff. I may use some of it for the 1" power-feed belt. On the main belt, I'll probably go with 3 or 4 ply "Super-Grip Flat Belt". I've got a clipper lacer, but I need a single stick of #2 or #3 lace, I don't really want to buy a whole 12 pack. If anyone knows of somebody that would make me a deal on single 12" stick, let me know please.

@Jim,

I should have finished it up over winter break, but somehow I was extremely ineffective. I guess us college students just get lazy during breaks. I'm back at school now so the progress is slow but regular. A lot of things happened off camera, but it's getting pretty close to being ready. I can really start just slapping parts on now.

The Metal Butcher
03-29-2019, 12:53 AM
I'm getting pretty close to finishing this project up, and I was I'm getting ready to buy some belting. Problem is I need someone clipper lace as well. Does anyone have or know of someone that someone that would sell me a single stick of #2 or #3 clipper? I really don't want to buy a 12 pack from mcmaster when I only need 2".

I think I'll have a new video out sunday. I finished up brazing up the backgear shaft and should have the whole main shaft on by then.

wierdscience
03-30-2019, 04:00 AM
I'm getting pretty close to finishing this project up, and I was I'm getting ready to buy some belting. Problem is I need someone clipper lace as well. Does anyone have or know of someone that someone that would sell me a single stick of #2 or #3 clipper? I really don't want to buy a 12 pack from mcmaster when I only need 2".

I think I'll have a new video out sunday. I finished up brazing up the backgear shaft and should have the whole main shaft on by then.

I might have some,I can check Monday if you still are in need of it.

reggie_obe
03-30-2019, 08:24 AM
I'm getting pretty close to finishing this project up, and I was I'm getting ready to buy some belting. Problem is I need someone clipper lace as well. Does anyone have or know of someone that someone that would sell me a single stick of #2 or #3 clipper? I really don't want to buy a 12 pack from mcmaster when I only need 2".

I think I'll have a new video out sunday. I finished up brazing up the backgear shaft and should have the whole main shaft on by then.

Does 2 or 3 Clipper lacing cross over to any specific # in conveyor belt lacing? Have access to a few different sizes, but can't get to them until Tuesday.

Illinoyance
03-30-2019, 01:27 PM
Warning to user:Make sure the big feed handle on the right is latched up when you finish a hole. If you don't and you are using the little T feed handle on the left to lower the drill to line up on a hole the big handle on the right is going to come down and smack you in the head.
Ask me how I know

The Metal Butcher
03-30-2019, 04:18 PM
I might have some,I can check Monday if you still are in need of it.

Thanks I'd appreciate it!


Does 2 or 3 Clipper lacing cross over to any specific # in conveyor belt lacing? Have access to a few different sizes, but can't get to them until Tuesday.

I'm not sure. Clipper is a bunch of little staple looking things, but I think conveyor belt lacing is wide and flat and wouldn't work well in this situation.


Warning to user:Make sure the big feed handle on the right is latched up when you finish a hole. If you don't and you are using the little T feed handle on the left to lower the drill to line up on a hole the big handle on the right is going to come down and smack you in the head.
Ask me how I know

For sure. I've about had that happen already. I'll definitely be careful, that handle is super heavy!

The Metal Butcher
04-02-2019, 11:38 PM
I might have some,I can check Monday if you still are in need of it.


Does 2 or 3 Clipper lacing cross over to any specific # in conveyor belt lacing? Have access to a few different sizes, but can't get to them until Tuesday.

Any updates?

--------------

Speaking of updates, I have one.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GVbmEzBvVbQ

Edit: BTW, we tore into the motor. It looks to be an all original GE unit, 1hp, with plain bearings on either end. There are oil reservoirs and little disks which roll around and kick oil up onto the shaft. Haven't spun it under power yet, but it seems to be in really good shape. I didn't get any pictures of the inside unfortunately.

The Metal Butcher
04-23-2019, 12:10 PM
I took Easter Sunday and got it finished up. What a beast! Doesn't even flinch at a 1 1/2" drill bit.

I ended up finding a good price on some clipper on ebay. I bought the mcmaster 5 ply belt and used polyurethane for the feed. I'm not sold on the polyurethane. It has very little friction, and if you stretch it like they say to do, then it's very hard to get on. I'd still probably use it again, just not stretch it much at all as the feed belt doesn't need to be very tight, it's double worm reduced.

It's a really nice addition to the shop. I used it that day for some 3/4" holes, and just popped them right through with no pilot even with a dull drill. I can't believe they phased these out. They're slow to change belts around, but in use it's really a Caddilac to operate.
http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/attachment.php?attachmentid=5119&d=1556390519
http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/attachment.php?attachmentid=5118&d=1556390519
http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/attachment.php?attachmentid=5120&d=1556390519


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fY4N5QQfjzM

Thanks everyone for your interest and insight. Ohio Mike I really appreciate your tips on this machine. I'm not sure mine looks quite as sharp as yours but I'm happy with it!

reggie_obe
04-23-2019, 12:24 PM
Is your spindle missing the drip oiler at the top? My Royersford 22" has a Trico drip oiler in the front.

The Metal Butcher
04-23-2019, 01:55 PM
Is your spindle missing the drip oiler at the top? My Royersford 22" has a Trico drip oiler in the front.

Everything is there that came with it.

Ohio Mike
04-23-2019, 09:03 PM
Is your spindle missing the drip oiler at the top? My Royersford 22" has a Trico drip oiler in the front.


Everything is there that came with it.

Yep, no drip oiler on them originally.

Where is your drip oiler located?