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View Full Version : Save your bacon grease and Leather/Serpentine Belt questions



FordFanatic1988
08-15-2018, 09:32 PM
I had done some reading over the past several weeks and stumbled across something saying that animal fats work good for Machining lubricants... So I figured I would give bacon grease a shot..... Seems to work quite well.

How I collect the grease is I cook up a bit of Bacon and then pour the grease thru a Coffee filter while still hot. Most of it WILL Drip thru the filter but the last little bit may need a bit of Coaxing(squeeze it with some BBQ tongs).

The chips tend to hang to the work a little bit using this but the cuts seem to do quite well.


I do not have any other basis for comparison other than my own observations and I have not used anything else yet due to the fact this is actually free whereas the others are not..... so if any of you want to try and report your Opinions that would be great.


BTW I also need a 43-44 Inch long belt 3/4-1" wide..... Mine broke the other day mid cut.....May stay with leather belt but I Was thinking about switching to a continuous serpentine belt from either Gates or Goodyear I do know I am going to have to pull the Spindle AND the Rear Step Pulley apart in order to Install a Serp and I already have a new felt set from Ebay.... Thoughts, Opinions????

Lathe is a South Bend Model A 9" x 54"

BCRider
08-15-2018, 09:35 PM
It does work but the attraction of a fatty grease of this sort for bugs and rodents isn't worth it to me. And if not kept cool it goes rancid after some shortish time.

CalM
08-15-2018, 10:42 PM
It does work but the attraction of a fatty grease of this sort for bugs and rodents isn't worth it to me. And if not kept cool it goes rancid after some shortish time.

I use canola oil a bit for drilling and threading.

Left out it thickens (polymers do that with time) So I keep the bulk in a cooking oil bottle (creative ehh? )

There is a small problem with keeping things clean, as hot chips will kick off the oil and stick themselves to most anything. Cleanup after use is a must, but also a good practice regardless of the lube.

The real issue is that I often need to break away from the machining operation and go make a batch of popcorn. The aroma of hot cooking oil get's me hungry!

johansen
08-15-2018, 11:04 PM
for a belt you can use fiberglass re-enforced packaging tape. loop it around sticky side up and once you get 1 full turn apply some tension to the belt while continuing to wrap the tape around 2 more times. then cut the tape, flip the tape over and make one wrap over the top.

i recently cut the belt on my lathe in order to move it, but the prior fiberglass belt lasted about a year with no sign of creepage (yes i once tried ducttape, it creeps, and is slipperier)

anyhow the weight of the under drive assembly alone is enough to tension the belt, i don't have to lock the handle down to apply more tension.

if you don't have to splice the belt, then clearly a serpentine belt is better..

A.K. Boomer
08-15-2018, 11:26 PM
whale blubber is the absolute best - kinda scarce these days but i have my connections, yes shop smells awful esp. when you consider it's part of the house - and flys are everywhere but what a finish for cutting fluid and it's great to lube your ways with. once you try it you will never go back to anything else...


if done right it doubles as a way wiper - remove your old rubber ones the throw them away, sandwitch some blub where the old wipers were and force it down a little before you anchor with the plate and screws, now you will not only have to never lube your machine for a year or two , it doubles as a wiper,,, about every three months the surface will turn gray with rot, just scrape that off to get to the better flesh, put the rotten flesh in the brush bucket for lubing parts whilst cutting,,, works like a charm, try not to heat your workpeice up too much or the smell will about knock you out, if you ever have company explain to people what the smell is, best not to let them wonder what's going on in your basement...

ekk33
08-15-2018, 11:27 PM
Leatherdrivebelts.com
Owned by John Knox former Sheldon lathe superintendent
He can help you out
Good guy full of information

10KPete
08-15-2018, 11:33 PM
Bacon grease will contain salt. Lots of it. Salt can only be removed with water.

Doesn't sound like stuff to have in the shop let alone on the machines.

Pete

3 Phase Lightbulb
08-15-2018, 11:37 PM
Now I'm drying for some Candy Bacon.

http://www.slapyodaddybbq.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/09/IMG_3534_crop2.jpg

BCRider
08-16-2018, 12:00 AM
I use canola oil a bit for drilling and threading.

Left out it thickens (polymers do that with time) So I keep the bulk in a cooking oil bottle (creative ehh? )

There is a small problem with keeping things clean, as hot chips will kick off the oil and stick themselves to most anything. Cleanup after use is a must, but also a good practice regardless of the lube.

The real issue is that I often need to break away from the machining operation and go make a batch of popcorn. The aroma of hot cooking oil get's me hungry!

I use Canola oil on my black powder revolvers to keep the cylinders running free and the fouling soft and oily. It works superbly.

I learned from looking into it that rape seed oil (Canola) first found a mechanical use in the valves on steam engines in merchant shipping back around WWII. Seems it keeps a lot of its lubricating properties even when being used in superheated steam installations.

I worried about corrosion due to fatty acids and such or just the ability to keep water away. So I oiled up some steel samples and left them out. The Canola out did ALL other options.... Then I noticed that the sunny days had kicked off the polymerization and turned it into an actual varnish film... I really should do the test again but this time keep it out of the sun and heat so it stays liquid.

On the guns it's fine and I use it regularly on two day shoots when I quick clean the guns in the evening of the first day. But even in the cool and dark it gums up after a couple of weeks. So once back home and the guns are fully cleaned to put away it's back to good ol' Ballistol.

Never really thought of using it in the shop though. The gumming up puts me off that idea. But how is it for threading compared to something like Tapzall or Tap Magic fluids?

FordFanatic1988
08-16-2018, 01:03 AM
I use Canola oil on my black powder revolvers to keep the cylinders running free and the fouling soft and oily. It works superbly.

I learned from looking into it that rape seed oil (Canola) first found a mechanical use in the valves on steam engines in merchant shipping back around WWII. Seems it keeps a lot of its lubricating properties even when being used in superheated steam installations.

I worried about corrosion due to fatty acids and such or just the ability to keep water away. So I oiled up some steel samples and left them out. The Canola out did ALL other options.... Then I noticed that the sunny days had kicked off the polymerization and turned it into an actual varnish film... I really should do the test again but this time keep it out of the sun and heat so it stays liquid.

On the guns it's fine and I use it regularly on two day shoots when I quick clean the guns in the evening of the first day. But even in the cool and dark it gums up after a couple of weeks. So once back home and the guns are fully cleaned to put away it's back to good ol' Ballistol.

Never really thought of using it in the shop though. The gumming up puts me off that idea. But how is it for threading compared to something like Tapzall or Tap Magic fluids?


I do not know yet.... I am not really into threading yet.... getting there though...

thaiguzzi
08-16-2018, 02:02 AM
Bacon grease will contain salt. Lots of it. Salt can only be removed with water.

Doesn't sound like stuff to have in the shop let alone on the machines.

Pete

Completely agree. I just don't understand why people don't buy the proper stuff. Hell a pint of brand name neat cutting oil is about $10 delivered if i am not correct? Last for ages using a brush on a mill and lathe.

Arcane
08-16-2018, 03:12 AM
If you want to use bacon drippings, buy unsalted bacon, otherwise don't use it. If you don't want to go to the trouble of finding unsalted bacon it looks like lard oil is still available.

https://www.mcmaster.com/#1308K4

Personally, considering just how far a little bit of cutting oil goes, I don't know why any home shop machinist wouldn't just use an easy to find modern cutting fluid.

RMinMN
08-16-2018, 07:46 AM
If you want to use bacon drippings, buy unsalted bacon, otherwise don't use it. If you don't want to go to the trouble of finding unsalted bacon it looks like lard oil is still available.

https://www.mcmaster.com/#1308K4

Personally, considering just how far a little bit of cutting oil goes, I don't know why any home shop machinist wouldn't just use an easy to find modern cutting fluid.

If it isn't salted it isn't bacon, just side pork. Instead of bacon grease, just collect the grease from a pork roast that has been cooked without salt.

MattiJ
08-16-2018, 07:50 AM
If you want to use bacon drippings, buy unsalted bacon, otherwise don't use it. If you don't want to go to the trouble of finding unsalted bacon it looks like lard oil is still available.


Boiling the bacon fat with some water and collecting the separated fat after cooling should get rid of the salt. Salt doesn't dissolve much in pure fat even to start with..
And even unsalted meat contains salt but the amount is maybe 1/10th of cured meats. Blood for example is pretty salty by nature.

Mcgyver
08-16-2018, 08:04 AM
Completely agree. I just don't understand why people don't buy the proper stuff. Hell a pint of brand name neat cutting oil is about $10 delivered if i am not correct? Last for ages using a brush on a mill and lathe.

agreed. fat and suet is for the birds

A.K. Boomer
08-16-2018, 08:54 AM
it's because most people just don't know the benefits of certain types of fats,

Whale blubber is actually a table "dampener" and if you were used to taking .050" cuts you can now take .1"
with zero chatter, it will make a 1 1/2 hp motor behave like 3 ponies, I had to build an electric fence around the mill to keep the dogs out, but it's worth it...

it's not all roses - it does attract bot fly's and they like to lay eggs under your skin but u kinda get used to it after awhile.

brian Rupnow
08-16-2018, 09:04 AM
If you continue to use bacon grease as a cutting oil, sooner or later a giant rat will appear in your workshop and eat your mill and your lathe.

CCWKen
08-16-2018, 09:34 AM
It's always the same "I know better", macho "watch this", impress the wife, know-nothing machinist rookie that comes up with substitutes for what works best. They won't buy 2-cycle motor oil. They buy the cheapest motor oil for their pickup truck. After changing the oil in their pickup, they re-use that cheap oil in their lawnmowers. They keep 1-2 quarts of oil on a shelf for backup but 3-4 cases of beer under the bench.

You can't "learn them anything" so don't even try. :cool:

3 Phase Lightbulb
08-16-2018, 09:48 AM
It's always the same "I know better", macho "watch this", impress the wife, know-nothing machinist rookie that comes up with substitutes for what works best. They won't buy 2-cycle motor oil. They buy the cheapest motor oil for their pickup truck. After changing the oil in their pickup, they re-use that cheap oil in their lawnmowers. They keep 1-2 quarts of oil on a shelf for backup but 3-4 cases of beer under the bench.

You can't "learn them anything" so don't even try. :cool:

My dad used to reuse the Mobil-1 synthetic that I'd pull out of my car every ~3 months. He called me crazy and I called him crazy. I realize now that I was the crazy one :)

Michael Edwards
08-16-2018, 10:47 AM
Boiling the bacon fat with some water and collecting the separated fat after cooling should get rid of the salt.


https://vignette.wikia.nocookie.net/wingsoffire/images/a/a7/Aint-nobody-got-time-for-that.png/revision/latest?cb=20140329000301

A.K. Boomer
08-16-2018, 10:59 AM
during the great depression we were given whale blubber rations for the machines, many of us would use the blubber for the wipers then after a few months change out the wipers and eat the old blubber, it was rancid and horrible but would support life

it also made for sandwich material if you could find some bread, was always loaded with chips but usually small enough to not cause harm, poor old Scotty machined nothing but beryllium - did not take long he got the cancer in his innerds

we pulled our money together and even though we could not afford a doctor we took him to the local vet - had to have him put down... was a good guy, hard explaining it to his wife and kids...

reggie_obe
08-16-2018, 11:36 AM
during the great depression we were given whale blubber rations for the machines, many of us would use the blubber for the wipers then after a few months change out the wipers and eat the old blubber, it was rancid and horrible but would support life



So you were a machinist during the Great Depression......that would mean you're in your 90's now?. Amazing that you can still mountain bike at your age.

A.K. Boomer
08-16-2018, 12:47 PM
that's not half of it, not just MTB - set king of the mt. strava records :p

BCRider
08-16-2018, 03:01 PM
That's nuthin' I used to live in a SHOE BOX in the middle o'the ROAD! We'd work 26 hrs a day at the mill and when we got home t'the shoe box our pa would trash us within an inch o'our lives before bed... .And that's if we were LUCKY!

Mcgyver
08-16-2018, 04:37 PM
well better that than a paper bag in a septic tank....and we still bloody well wouldn't use bacon as cutting fluid

randyjaco
08-16-2018, 07:05 PM
I have used lard cut with kerosene for years. It's cheap and I have found no negatives. Some people say that lard will turn rancid, I find that a tub of lard will last over a year in my shop without going bad.
Randy

brian Rupnow
08-16-2018, 08:15 PM
During the depression my grandpa just grabbed a small pig and held it up against whatever he was machining for a minute or so. Made the pig squeal like hell, but worked good as a lubricant.

Jim Stewart
08-16-2018, 08:19 PM
Yep. The first liar never has a chance.

-js

thaiguzzi
08-17-2018, 10:55 AM
it's because most people just don't know the benefits of certain types of fats,

Whale blubber is actually a table "dampener" and if you were used to taking .050" cuts you can now take .1"
with zero chatter, it will make a 1 1/2 hp motor behave like 3 ponies, I had to build an electric fence around the mill to keep the dogs out, but it's worth it...

it's not all roses - it does attract bot fly's and they like to lay eggs under your skin but u kinda get used to it after awhile.

LOL

thaiguzzi
08-17-2018, 10:57 AM
during the great depression we were given whale blubber rations for the machines, many of us would use the blubber for the wipers then after a few months change out the wipers and eat the old blubber, it was rancid and horrible but would support life

it also made for sandwich material if you could find some bread, was always loaded with chips but usually small enough to not cause harm, poor old Scotty machined nothing but beryllium - did not take long he got the cancer in his innerds

we pulled our money together and even though we could not afford a doctor we took him to the local vet - had to have him put down... was a good guy, hard explaining it to his wife and kids...

Stop it!
The lot of you!

Video Man
08-17-2018, 01:18 PM
The OP is on the right track, historically speaking. Lard oil has been used in machining steel for many years. In WWII the government asked people to save fats so they could be made into machining fluids. Here's a way that works: Buy unsalted lard -- sold at the grocery in tubs. Heat the lard over low heat, preferably in a double boiler for safety, until it melts. I mix in 1/3 mineral spirits or other solvent. Allow this mix to settle out for two or three days until a white, granular substance (stearic acid) separates. Remove this as it is useless for the purpose. What is left is oleic acid, commonly known as lard oil, and this is the stuff that does the job. The mix of lard oil and solvent stays stable and doesn't ever seem to go rancid --- I have some in my shop that's three or four years old and still good. And it does a great job on steel. This, of course, is if you want to do it the hard way. You can buy good stuff made for the purpose, of course.

cameron
08-17-2018, 01:51 PM
The OP is on the right track, historically speaking. Lard oil has been used in machining steel for many years. In WWII the government asked people to save fats so they could be made into machining fluids. Here's a way that works: Buy unsalted lard -- sold at the grocery in tubs. Heat the lard over low heat, preferably in a double boiler for safety, until it melts. I mix in 1/3 mineral spirits or other solvent. Allow this mix to settle out for two or three days until a white, granular substance (stearic acid) separates. Remove this as it is useless for the purpose. What is left is oleic acid, commonly known as lard oil, and this is the stuff that does the job. The mix of lard oil and solvent stays stable and doesn't ever seem to go rancid --- I have some in my shop that's three or four years old and still good. And it does a great job on steel. This, of course, is if you want to do it the hard way. You can buy good stuff made for the purpose, of course.

Of course we want to do it the hard way, the easy way is no fun, let alone the all too apparent fact that taking the easy way is rapidly leading to the breakdown of western society.

Now, how do we sulphurize that lard oil? I don't think that just adding elemental sulphur is going to do it.

Paul Alciatore
08-17-2018, 04:30 PM
I also tried it once. That's once as in ONE time. It took me hours to clean up the lathe. Once was enough.




It does work but the attraction of a fatty grease of this sort for bugs and rodents isn't worth it to me. And if not kept cool it goes rancid after some shortish time.

FordFanatic1988
08-17-2018, 11:10 PM
I have used lard cut with kerosene for years. It's cheap and I have found no negatives. Some people say that lard will turn rancid, I find that a tub of lard will last over a year in my shop without going bad.
Randy

That is the precise reason why I picked bacon grease.... it is about the closest thing I can personally get ahold of at this time and on my current financial constraints...

A.K. Boomer
08-17-2018, 11:26 PM
Im just thinking of all the poor slobs that were brainstorming through the night and wake up extra early to do a little machining in the basement and then they hear the Bride upstairs say in a half awake voice "honey --- are you gonna make some eggs with that too?"

then he's off to the store to pick up some bacon and eggs cursing all the way there and back, project never gets built and what was started gets $hitcanned a week later due to him not knowing what the hell it was for to begin with...

FordFanatic1988
08-18-2018, 12:19 PM
Im just thinking of all the poor slobs that were brainstorming through the night and wake up extra early to do a little machining in the basement and then they hear the Bride upstairs say in a half awake voice "honey --- are you gonna make some eggs with that too?"

then he's off to the store to pick up some bacon and eggs cursing all the way there and back, project never gets built and what was started gets $hitcanned a week later due to him not knowing what the hell it was for to begin with...

LOL

RMinMN
08-18-2018, 12:43 PM
That is the precise reason why I picked bacon grease.... it is about the closest thing I can personally get ahold of at this time and on my current financial constraints...

You can buy a 3 pound tub of lard at Walmart for $12.99. May be a little higher in other grocery stores. It will not be in the cooler, just on a shelf as it needs no refrigeration. If you can afford bacon at the current prices, you can easily afford lard.

754
08-18-2018, 02:40 PM
So I have to ask, the South Bend owners, what do you use in the little reservoir on your SB tailstock, to lube you non revolving centre ?

FordFanatic1988
08-18-2018, 03:46 PM
So I have to ask, the South Bend owners, what do you use in the little reservoir on your SB tailstock, to lube you non revolving centre ?

????? What little reservoir??

reggie_obe
08-18-2018, 06:36 PM
So I have to ask, the South Bend owners, what do you use in the little reservoir on your SB tailstock, to lube you non revolving centre ?

That's where he keeps a bit of red lead to daub on the tip of his dead center.

MattiJ
08-19-2018, 03:53 AM
Been using canola oil for 2 years in my shop, no issues with gumming if you wipe everything clean at least once in a while.
Small lard tube is also handy when tapping and drilling:
https://static1.motonet.fi/img/8/8500123/500/8500123.jpg

challenger
08-19-2018, 07:56 AM
Walmart definitely has plenty of lard, pigs AND whales. Just take a stroll through the isles and watch the wildlife parade.

Sent from my Pixel 2 using Tapatalk

Arcane
08-19-2018, 08:31 AM
Have a look-see through this company's product line.

http://www.mullenoil.com/eezproducts.html

reggie_obe
08-19-2018, 08:38 AM
Walmart definitely has plenty of lard, pigs AND whales. Just take a stroll through the isles and watch the wildlife parade.

Sent from my Pixel 2 using Tapatalk

All the free fat you could want at a liposuction clinic.

jdedmon91
08-19-2018, 09:02 AM
Completely agree. I just don't understand why people don't buy the proper stuff. Hell a pint of brand name neat cutting oil is about $10 delivered if i am not correct? Last for ages using a brush on a mill and lathe.

Agreed, I ordered a gallon of dark cutting oil Preimer brand for $30 to my door. The last gallon of cutting oil lasted at least 6 months ( Iím in my shop most days now Iím retired) in fact I got it from my day job before I retired and had it a while


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

Mcgyver
08-19-2018, 09:03 AM
All the free fat you could want at a liposuction clinic.

or if the middle age spare tire is starting to make an appearance, just get a DIY kit

jdedmon91
08-19-2018, 09:03 AM
It's always the same "I know better", macho "watch this", impress the wife, know-nothing machinist rookie that comes up with substitutes for what works best. They won't buy 2-cycle motor oil. They buy the cheapest motor oil for their pickup truck. After changing the oil in their pickup, they re-use that cheap oil in their lawnmowers. They keep 1-2 quarts of oil on a shelf for backup but 3-4 cases of beer under the bench.

You can't "learn them anything" so don't even try. :cool:

Yep I know some of them


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

FordFanatic1988
08-19-2018, 06:56 PM
I am still wondering about the Small tailstock reservoir.... I don't have anything on mine that looks like a Reservoir.....

754
08-19-2018, 08:41 PM
Most of them have it its a bump across from your tailstock quill binding lever. Looks like something didnt get tapped.,

challenger
08-19-2018, 09:00 PM
My Sheldon exl has a drilled hole in the ts that I've been told is a reservoir for dead center lube. It looks like nothing more than an untapped blind hole.

Sent from my Pixel 2 using Tapatalk

cameron
08-19-2018, 09:13 PM
That's where he keeps a bit of red lead to daub on the tip of his dead center.

I'm pretty sure that should be white lead. It better be white lead, because I've been keeping about 2/3 of a ten pound pail of the stuff for about thirty years just in case I happen to buy a lathe with one of those little reservoirs in the tailstock.

Jim Stewart
08-19-2018, 09:52 PM
I'm pretty sure that should be white lead. It better be white lead, because I've been keeping about 2/3 of a ten pound pail of the stuff for about thirty years just in case I happen to buy a lathe with one of those little reservoirs in the tailstock.

60 years ago in my high school machine shop I remember the lathes all had those pots on the tailstock. It was white lead.

-js

johansen
08-20-2018, 01:59 AM
my brother gave me major **** when i admitted to him that a certain car battery disappeared. so did some aluminum.

apparently filling the neighbors yard with white smoke is only ok if its non toxic smoke.

3 Phase Lightbulb
08-20-2018, 09:10 AM
my brother gave me major **** when i admitted to him that a certain car battery disappeared. so did some aluminum.

apparently filling the neighbors yard with white smoke is only ok if its non toxic smoke.

I had a lead acid battery blow it's top off and scare the living beatlejuice out of me. It was a starter battery for a small 8kw diesel generator. I was winterizing the generator and needed to start it up so that it would suck in antifreeze threw the heat exchanger. As soon as I pressed the start button, BOOM the top of the battler blew off and I was very close to it. It didn't just blow the caps off, the entire top of the battery case cracked and blew the entire top of the battery off. I had never heard of this happening before.

Edit: This is kind of what my battery looked like after it blew the top off. My battery had side posts so nothing to keep the entire top portion from blowing off. I don't remember the actual battery brand. I just know I bought it at either West marine or Autozone about 3 years earlier.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yHhBdAzG6eM

FordFanatic1988
08-23-2018, 03:51 AM
Well this thread got COMPLETELY Hijacked.... Or so it would appear....

challenger
08-23-2018, 05:56 PM
Yikes! We need to see a photo of your place if you save stuff for 30 years on a hunch that you might come across a piece of equipment that might use it. [emoji16]. Oops 🤣I'm the same way.
I'm pretty sure that should be white lead. It better be white lead, because I've been keeping about 2/3 of a ten pound pail of the stuff for about thirty years just in case I happen to buy a lathe with one of those little reservoirs in the tailstock.

Sent from my Pixel 2 using Tapatalk

reggie_obe
08-23-2018, 07:12 PM
I'm pretty sure that should be white lead. It better be white lead, because I've been keeping about 2/3 of a ten pound pail of the stuff for about thirty years just in case I happen to buy a lathe with one of those little reservoirs in the tailstock.

Yes, white lead..., both red lead and white lead formerly were used a s paint pigments.