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epicfail48
08-30-2018, 08:52 PM
Does anybody have experience using a tool post mounted chuck for drilling holes on the lathe? Something like this:
https://littlemachineshop.com/products/product_view.php?ProductID=3119&category=1005208204

With a drill chuck inserted of course. Id like a way to make drilling deeper holes slightly more tolerable, tailstock only has 1.5 inches of travel and sweet jimney christmas that crank it a bloody pain after a bit. So, any first-hand experience floating around out there? How easy is alignment to start drilling? Vertical seems dead simple, set that once and never change it. Angle seems just as easy, dial indicator and some drill rod to dial it parallel with the ways. In and out seems a little fuzzier to me, but even then moving the carriage until the drill tracks on center seems pretty quick and easy.

So, am i missing something here, or is it as nice as my mind wants to make it? I really just want a way to clear chips out of those 2.5" deep holes that doesnt involve five thousand cranks on that handwheel, digging up a wrench, unlocking the tailstock, yanking the tailstock back without bumping it off the bed ways, cleaing and lubing the drill, then repeating the entire process in reverse. Plus, cant say the idea of running a reamer in that process fills me with hope...

Cheers!

Bob La Londe
08-30-2018, 09:02 PM
Nope. I haven't drilled with the tool post, but I have a turret tool I had planned to setup for a job that never materialized. Let us know how it works out.

Toolguy
08-30-2018, 09:20 PM
You can use a regular quick change toolholder with a straight shank chuck in it. They have dedicated ones that are very expensive. https://www.ebay.com/itm/ALORIS-BXA-35-DOVETAIL-CHUCK-HOLDER-0-1-2-CAPACITY-CNC-LATHE-QUICK-CHANGE-USA/122045967098?epid=7010607014&hash=item1c6a81aafa:g:sQIAAOSwuhFaHz3P

Bob La Londe
08-30-2018, 09:31 PM
You can use a regular quick change toolholder with a straight shank chuck in it. They have dedicated ones that are very expensive. https://www.ebay.com/itm/ALORIS-BXA-35-DOVETAIL-CHUCK-HOLDER-0-1-2-CAPACITY-CNC-LATHE-QUICK-CHANGE-USA/122045967098?epid=7010607014&hash=item1c6a81aafa:g:sQIAAOSwuhFaHz3P

Yeah, its a little expensive, but I LIKE THAT. I'll have to add it to my list of retirement projects to make one. LOL. Be pretty easy with a threaded chuck with an internal retaining bolt. Just take an afternoon to do it.


Reality check of course... I have a couple straight shank chucks, and atleast two or three lathe tool holders with the groove in the bottom for a boring bar. LOL.

epicfail48
08-30-2018, 09:42 PM
Reality check of course... I have a couple straight shank chucks, and atleast two or three lathe tool holders with the groove in the bottom for a boring bar. LOL.

Not gonna lie, i thought about just grabbing a chuck with a 1/2" straight shank and throwing it in my boring bar holder. Actually the more expensive option, given that a halfway decent chuck setup would cost more than the mt2 holder and using my tailstock tooling.

Im somewhat encouraged by the fact that nobody has immediately said "thats a stupid idea dont do it" or "tried it once, didnt work worth a darn". Seems like a good sign, i think.

mattthemuppet
08-30-2018, 09:44 PM
I have both a straight shank drill chuck held in a boring bar holder and a drill driven drill chuck in a holder that I use for cross drilling. I use both alot - my lathe also has a miserable amount of tail stock quill travel. I haven't found it hard to get the horizontal alignment right - make sure the end of the piece is faced flat without a pip, eyeball it and then look at the tip of the drill. You can see if it's off center very quickly as the tip will oscilate. Or you can start the hole with the tail stock and line it up that way. Or you can center drill the piece and stick a rod with a 60deg cone in the drill chuck and line it up using the center.

Makes deep hole drilling a dream. I also use the 3/8" shank drill chuck on my mill too, saves changing the collet or collet chuck.

MattiJ
08-31-2018, 01:01 AM
Not gonna lie, i thought about just grabbing a chuck with a 1/2" straight shank and throwing it in my boring bar holder. Actually the more expensive option, given that a halfway decent chuck setup would cost more than the mt2 holder and using my tailstock tooling.

Im somewhat encouraged by the fact that nobody has immediately said "thats a stupid idea dont do it" or "tried it once, didnt work worth a darn". Seems like a good sign, i think.

It works really good for smallish drills. For large drills the feeding force can get unpleasantly high with small lathe.

I just clamp shafted chuck to qctp and eyeball it straigt with long rod.
For looong drills er-chuck is even better because you can adjust the drill lenght.
Best I have done was 200mm deep 4mm hole in stainless ..

https://i.imgur.com/ne3DeVVh.jpg

Black Forest
08-31-2018, 02:24 AM
On my lathe the carriage can tow the tailstock. Quite handy for drilling large diameter holes.

epicfail48
08-31-2018, 04:18 AM
It works really good for smallish drills. For large drills the feeding force can get unpleasantly high with small lathe.

I just clamp shafted chuck to qctp and eyeball it straigt with long rod.
For looong drills er-chuck is even better because you can adjust the drill lenght.
Best I have done was 200mm deep 4mm hole in stainless ..

https://i.imgur.com/ne3DeVVh.jpg

How big is 'big'? I figured that larger bits run the risk of twisting the tool post, but there the question is still where the 'larger' line lies. For my purposes i doubt hole size would ever be above 3/8" for most things, with the occasional larger being step drilled. Immediate use tasks are 7/32" pre-ream drilling and reaming, which im hoping is well inside the size limits. Lathe managed it fine when feeding with the tailstock, so i cant imagine the tool post presting over much of a problem.


On my lathe the carriage can tow the tailstock. Quite handy for drilling large diameter holes.

Ive seen people doing that, looks like a pretty nifty trick. Never work on mine though, theres no way to lock the tailpost to the bed enough to stay stable but not enough to lock movement.

Ill confess, i actually pulled the trigger on the tool holder a bit after posting this. Was ordering tooling for a project anyway, figured why not, you know? Seems like a reasonable solution to my problem and i didnt get anybody immediately decrying it as a bad idea which i figure is a very good sign. Should be a nicer way of drilling those deeper holes than the tailstock, plus i get to bypass the fact that my tailstock is .010" higher than center on my lathe... Need to fix that one of these days. Should have the new stuff in hand before long, ill get back with results!

rws
08-31-2018, 06:06 AM
There is one guy that uses a qctp holder to drive a chamber reamer in a barrel. I never did talk to him about it, seems it would be difficult to align everything. Height, fore and aft then getting the qctp in line. That's why most use the tailstock. But this guy does good work!

Now for drilling holes, and not cranking, I'm liking the idea.

MattiJ
08-31-2018, 06:29 AM
How big is 'big'? I figured that larger bits run the risk of twisting the tool post, but there the question is still where the 'larger' line lies.
Depends on your lathe size, 9x20 harbor freight or 18x60 Krasnoyarsk brute...

On my 11x24 kerry anything over 10mm gets kind of heavy on the hand wheel, forces on the tool post are still quite small at this level and not really limiting factor. YMMV, on some other lathe hand wheel could be geared totally different.
With pilot hole to reduce thrust I'd say anything up to 20mm would work on mine.

1-800miner
08-31-2018, 07:56 AM
On my lathe the carriage can tow the tailstock. Quite handy for drilling large diameter holes.

Like to see a picture of that set up.

reggie_obe
08-31-2018, 09:03 AM
Maybe the next two upgrades need to be: lever action tailstock feed; fitment of tailstock to bed improvement and quick release tailstock lock.
Both would make drilling easier.

nickel-city-fab
08-31-2018, 10:51 AM
I took a course on CNC machining a while back at the local community college. I noticed that they always used the lathe carriage for drilling, never the tailstock (Haas slant-bed machines) so yeah using the tool post to drill is a pretty good idea on a manual I bet. Any reason why you couldn't setup a fine feed like .002/rev and let the machine do the work?

Arcane
08-31-2018, 10:53 AM
I have a dumb question...why is the chuck mounted like this

https://i.ebayimg.com/images/g/sQIAAOSwuhFaHz3P/s-l300.jpg

instead of 90o to as it is shown? Wouldn't the 90o way eliminate any tendency for the tool holder to rotate? Or is it just not a problem? It seems like the 90o way would require less material to make.

JCByrd24
08-31-2018, 11:07 AM
I have a dumb question...why is the chuck mounted like this ....
instead of 90o to as it is shown? Wouldn't the 90o way eliminate any tendency for the tool holder to rotate? Or is it just not a problem? It seems like the 90o way would require less material to make.

My lathe runs the cross slide off it's leadscrew right around the point the toolpost stud is on CL from memory, maybe slightly before, which would make your proposed mounting not work.

nickel-city-fab
08-31-2018, 11:10 AM
Because Aloris and Dorian tool posts have dovetails on both the front and the sides.

Magicniner
08-31-2018, 11:34 AM
It works really good for smallish drills. For large drills the feeding force can get unpleasantly high with small lathe.

But you can use your tailstock to push the tool ;-)

Arcane
08-31-2018, 11:51 AM
My lathe runs the cross slide off it's leadscrew right around the point the toolpost stud is on CL from memory, maybe slightly before, which would make your proposed mounting not work.

Ah! It makes sense now. Thanks!

Bob La Londe
08-31-2018, 12:23 PM
I took a course on CNC machining a while back at the local community college. I noticed that they always used the lathe carriage for drilling, never the tailstock (Haas slant-bed machines) so yeah using the tool post to drill is a pretty good idea on a manual I bet. Any reason why you couldn't setup a fine feed like .002/rev and let the machine do the work?

And with a modest CNC setup multiple tool posts may be mounted on the cross slide. Drills, spot drills, turning tools, etc. Gang tooling. Its the Poorboy's version of a tool turret. LOL. On a setup like that (for shorter parts or parts mostly inside the chuck or a collet) the tailstock is rarely used at all.

Bob La Londe
08-31-2018, 12:27 PM
But you can use your tailstock to push the tool ;-)

Or you can (if you have enough bed length for it) put the tailstock in front of the carriage. My concern is with the tailstock loose rotational torque might cause it to lift up. Hmmm... I'm gonna have to try it now. I guess I could gently rest a hand on the locking lever.

mattthemuppet
08-31-2018, 12:31 PM
In terms of force on the carriage/ rack vs. drill size, it depends on material. I can easily run a 1/2" drill into delrin without a pilot hole, whereas 1/4 and above into steel with no pilot gets a little "not so sure about this". 3/8" with a pilot is fine though. I also like the fact that I can do multiple operations (drill, read, countersink) quickly and easily with the tool post chuck, whereas I'd be constantly moving the tail stock to accomodate the different length bits.

A quick action tailstock lock would be nice, but it still wouldn't make pecking deep holes that much easier.

MattiJ
08-31-2018, 12:41 PM
Maybe the next two upgrades need to be: lever action tailstock feed; fitment of tailstock to bed improvement and quick release tailstock lock.
Both would make drilling easier.
DRO with tool specific offsets would be really handy when drilling with carriage, no need to find the center after you set the tool offset once.
I would need also more qctp holders :p

Mcgyver
08-31-2018, 12:42 PM
not 100% what you asked for, but the nicest incarnation of this idea imo is DSG's power drilling attachment.

Its keyed to a permanent bit of steel bolted to the cross slide so you never have think about alignment or position on the X. With a round hole, can have MT cylindrical adapters and power drill with drill chucks or MT drills....or for less demand drill sizes, use the carriage wheel.

Be aware that will spinning the tail stock wheel is a pita, you get a lot more mechanical advantage than with the carriage.

If you are up for making stuff, a tailstock lever feed is the best for small hole drilling - last photo is a Schuablin lever beside a replica by yours truly, lots of whittling!

https://i.imgur.com/yv1OW5I.jpg

https://i.imgur.com/NSMFgni.jpg

https://i.imgur.com/SJ3LYZf.jpg

reggie_obe
08-31-2018, 12:47 PM
A quick action tailstock lock would be nice, but it still wouldn't make pecking deep holes that much easier.

No, but the above in conjunction with a lever action tailstock barrel would.
Something similar to: http://mikesworkshop.weebly.com/lever-feed-tailstock.html

true temper
08-31-2018, 05:54 PM
Ah! It makes sense now. Thanks!

I am a little slow today. I still donít get it, it looks like to me it would be a lot more rigid to have the chuck in line with the center of the tool post, instead off to one side. Someone help me get it.

Bob La Londe
08-31-2018, 06:38 PM
I am a little slow today. I still don’t get it, it looks like to me it would be a lot more rigid to have the chuck in line with the center of the tool post, instead off to one side. Someone help me get it.

Go, out and crank the cross slide on your carriage in as far as it will go. Unless you jack the compound around it might not go in that far, and for any other kind of turning it probably doesn't need to.

darryl
08-31-2018, 07:05 PM
I do a fair amount of drilling on the lathe. I usually put through a pilot hole, then follow with the desired size drill bit. With a pilot hole in place, the drilling goes easier and I can often just push the tailstock along the ways. Much quicker than cranking, and probably more importantly it's quicker to withdraw the bit for cleaning. It takes only a second or two to insert and withdraw the bit a few times to clear the hole before pushing it in further. Doing this gives you an instant indication of whether the bit is wanting to seize, and you can withdraw it very quickly. Perhaps this is more dangerous for a larger lathe and/or larger size drill bits-

What comes to mind almost every time I drill like this is that the chuck could be mounted on a straight tube which is fitted onto a bar held in the tailstock. This would give a fair amount of travel and fast action, but would allow the tailstock to be secured in one position for stability. It would also use up some of the bed length. A two-sided handle would be fitted to the tube, and it would have a clutch so if the bit jammed the chuck could freewheel. Would be handy for tapping also. The best type of clutch might be one that would stay engaged up to an adjustable point, which when exceeded would release the hold completely. Usually there's a guide rod or something which would rest against one of the ways to prevent rotation of the handle during normal operation, but you might assess the need for this based on the torque required for drilling.

Besides using up some of the bed length, a sliding tube/bar setup like this would also affect the ability to start a drill bit on center. A guide mounted on the carriage would be helpful. I often use a blunt thing mounted instead of the cutting tool to help 'force' the bit to start well centered. I've also made up a few adapters which can ride the ways and provide a centered hole for this purpose. The adapter is mounted, then a center hole is marked in the adapter using a short drill bit held in the chuck. The adapter is 'flexed' into the drill bit using the tailstock. This provides a well-centered divot, and you then remove the adapter and drill it through with the pilot hole size drill bit. If your tailstock can provide a well-centered divot to begin with, then you won't need to go this extra mile.

Of course your particular lathe will determine if any of this is useful. At my lathe, I can easily stand directly behind the tailstock and reach all the way to the chuck. I could probably get a range of about 6 inches out of such a method, which is about the deepest drilling I've ever done on the lathe. That takes a longish drill bit of course.

true temper
08-31-2018, 07:22 PM
Go, out and crank the cross slide on your carriage in as far as it will go. Unless you jack the compound around it might not go in that far, and for any other kind of turning it probably doesn't need to.

Don’t know for sure but I assume the tool post center will go past spindle center. I will be finding out.

nickel-city-fab
08-31-2018, 10:59 PM
Donít know for sure but I assume the tool post center will go past spindle center. I will be finding out.

Every lathe I've ever seen, the tool post center will indeed go past the spindle center a ways. Even the cheap ones will. So like I said before, I would just mount a drill chuck in a QCTP holder and use the power feed. With that setup, the tool post is still not near the spindle center, the drill bit is.

CalM
09-01-2018, 12:04 AM
I have Morse taper tool blocks for both the KDK 100 and the Aloris CX. I use them when repeat holes are needed. I never put a chuck on them, just the MT drills.

Alignment and centering is only a few moments attention each. Center drilling and a pre drill to suit the final drill web is done off the tail stock even if I need to push it through by hand.

Off center "push" has never even crossed my mind. A drill should not need that kind of pressure where that bit of offset would matter.

Tighten up the tool post fixing!

tmc_31
09-01-2018, 11:46 PM
I do this with my 1340 Jet. I have drilled 65 - 7/8' " holes through a 1" thick "biscuit" of 1018 steel. No center hole. It took a couple of times to figure out my correct feed and speed but after I got that part down it went smooth as melted butter.

One thing to watch for is the drill bit will be offset from the center of the toolpost. If the tool post is not pretty tight, It can spin. Had this happen once. fortunately I was watching close and was just getting started with the hole. I was able to stop the cut before any damage was done. My toolpost has a pin in the bottom to prevent the toolpost from spinning, unfortunately the pin was overcome by the force generated by the size hole I was drilling and it sheared. The solution was to use the pin and tighten the heck out of the toolpost center bolt. Another solution would be to use a hardened pin.

Ideally I would like to find a way to mount a #3 MT barrel directly over where the center pin sits on the crossslide. The barrel would be in a riser block that would center the 3MT hole with the centerline of the chuck.

Toolguy
09-02-2018, 10:08 AM
It would seem fairly easy to make the riser block for MT tools. Just build the block with the bolt and nut under the socket and drill and ream with the cutting tools in the lathe chuck or collet. You can feed the block into the cutters with the carriage and everything will be exactly on center without even measuring. You could even bore the hole before reaming with an endmill or boring head. Essentially making the lathe a horizontal boring mill.

Rich Carlstedt
09-02-2018, 10:41 AM
I have a dumb question...why is the chuck mounted like this

https://i.ebayimg.com/images/g/sQIAAOSwuhFaHz3P/s-l300.jpg

instead of 90o to as it is shown? Wouldn't the 90o way eliminate any tendency for the tool holder to rotate? Or is it just not a problem? It seems like the 90o way would require less material to make.

That's because alignment is a breeze with the offset Alloris Chuck as shown. ( not sure of imposters to Aloris)- there is a center hole dead nuts in the back !
The centered hole can also be used if you want the tailstock to assist the cross-slide with a heavy cut by using the tailstock hand feed

You run the tool-post up against the Lathe Chuck to assure the Tool-post is square, Then drop in the Aloris Holder and as you
move the cross-slide to the Lathe's center line, you bring up the tailstock with a center in it and introduce it into the centering hole.
The hole can be used for both height and Y location. Setting the Height ( which never changes !) is a piece of cake . Put a dowel pin in the drill chuck and bring it up to the Lathe chuck and clamp on the pin with a good 3 jaw and lock down the holders height screw for a permanent setting.

One big advantage of the drill chuck holder is for micro boring . You can easily put a micro boring bar in the drill chuck, rather then mess around with shims or spacers in a standard holder......and you know is is on center automatically.
I use mine up to about 5/8 in drill size for metals and larger in plastics in my 10 inch lathe.
When larger, I bore usually or use a larger lathe.

Rich

reggie_obe
09-02-2018, 10:51 AM
So, am i missing something here, or is it as nice as my mind wants to make it? I really just want a way to clear chips out of those 2.5" deep holes that doesnt involve five thousand cranks on that handwheel, digging up a wrench, unlocking the tailstock, yanking the tailstock back without bumping it off the bed ways, cleaing and lubing the drill, then repeating the entire process in reverse. Plus, cant say the idea of running a reamer in that process fills me with hope...

Cheers!

Maybe the something you are missing is a decent drillpress (not a Ryobi or HF special) a V-block and a toggle clamp. Much quicker for drilling than a small lathe and you don't have to power it off to swap parts.

epicfail48
09-02-2018, 01:49 PM
Maybe the something you are missing is a decent drillpress (not a Ryobi or HF special) a V-block and a toggle clamp. Much quicker for drilling than a small lathe and you don't have to power it off to swap parts.

I have 2, actually. Alignment of the part and setup of the necessary supports would take up more time than doing it in the lathe with the tailstock did. No repeat parts either, just one at a time.

reggie_obe
09-02-2018, 02:14 PM
I have 2, actually. Alignment of the part and setup of the necessary supports would take up more time than doing it in the lathe with the tailstock did. No repeat parts either, just one at a time.

How is the current method so arduous for one 2.50" deep hole? My interpretation of your first post is that you are drilling identically sized holes in the center of multiple identical parts.

Ridgerunner
09-02-2018, 03:27 PM
I added a couple of toe clamps to help align and keep the tool holder from twisting from the forces when drilling.

http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/attachment.php?attachmentid=3495&d=1535916107

epicfail48
09-02-2018, 06:30 PM
How is the current method so arduous for one 2.50" deep hole? My interpretation of your first post is that you are drilling identically sized holes in the center of multiple identical parts.

My tailstock quill is limited to 1.5" of movement, and even cranking it out to 1.5" and back is bloody irritating. Going past that requires unlocking the tailstock, moving it along the ways to clear chips, bringing it back to position, locking it down, cranking some more and repeating the process every 1/4" inch or so. Even for a single part, it takes a while, i think that 1 hole i did took me a good 20 minutes, what with all the locking and unlocking. Tailstock camlock would make it better, but the mt2 holder was cheaper.

Even if it was a production thing, id still rather the toolpost drill over a drill press. Less setup time, just drop the tool holder in and find the center vs setting up a load of fixturing, and the actual drilling would take about the same amount of time on both tools

JoeLee
09-02-2018, 08:03 PM
Because Aloris and Dorian tool posts have dovetails on both the front and the sides. You Got it. I have an Aloris BXA with an MT 3 bore. I just haven't found a use for mounting a chuck in the tool post yet. I'm guessing it would be kind of tricky to get it on center.
Front to back probably wouldn't be too difficult as you can use the cross slide for your adjustment but up and down is a different story you would have to rely on adjusting the height of the block in the tool post.

JL..........

ezduzit
09-02-2018, 08:12 PM
...I'm guessing it would be kind of tricky to get it on center.
Front to back probably wouldn't be too difficult as you can use the cross slide for your adjustment but up and down is a different story you would have to rely on adjusting the height of the block in the tool post.

JL..........

That's about as easy as you can get.

Ridgerunner
09-02-2018, 09:03 PM
One way to center up and down is to have a reference measurement and location that is repeatable. I have a tool center measurement taped to the machine and can use the cross slide for a height gauge. In the pictures I use a 1/2" precision round bar that is within 2 tenths but the neck of a drill can be used instead. Mic the neck of the drill and divide by 2.

All tool heights center.

http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/attachment.php?attachmentid=3510&d=1535935690

Setting drill center with precision round bar.

http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/attachment.php?attachmentid=3511&d=1535935703

precision round bar

http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/attachment.php?attachmentid=3509&d=1535935662

tomato coupe
09-03-2018, 12:17 AM
It works really good for smallish drills. For large drills the feeding force can get unpleasantly high with small lathe.

I just clamp shafted chuck to qctp and eyeball it straigt with long rod.
For looong drills er-chuck is even better because you can adjust the drill lenght.
Best I have done was 200mm deep 4mm hole in stainless ..

https://i.imgur.com/ne3DeVVh.jpg

We use a similar setup with ER16 and ER32 collets. The picture is of a 3/4" drill in an ER32 collet which we use to drill 303/304 stainless. We've never had a problem with the setup twisting. (Lathe is 16x30, tool post is CXA size.)

http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/attachment.php?attachmentid=3513&d=1535947807

Rich Carlstedt
09-03-2018, 12:56 AM
You Got it. I have an Aloris BXA with an MT 3 bore. I just haven't found a use for mounting a chuck in the tool post yet. I'm guessing it would be kind of tricky to get it on center.
Front to back probably wouldn't be too difficult as you can use the cross slide for your adjustment but up and down is a different story you would have to rely on adjusting the height of the block in the tool post.

JL..........
Joe, you missed my post....# 34
Alignment is a piece of cake in all directions.

Rich

nickel-city-fab
09-03-2018, 08:18 AM
You Got it. I have an Aloris BXA with an MT 3 bore. I just haven't found a use for mounting a chuck in the tool post yet. I'm guessing it would be kind of tricky to get it on center.
Front to back probably wouldn't be too difficult as you can use the cross slide for your adjustment but up and down is a different story you would have to rely on adjusting the height of the block in the tool post.

JL..........

Alignment is no biggie, at least not for me. Kinda like setting up for facing. I just stick a piece of hardened rod ground to a point, in the drill chuck. And a dead center in the lathe chuck. Adjust them till the points touch. Done, and ready to go.

JoeLee
09-03-2018, 09:02 AM
Joe, you missed my post....# 34
Alignment is a piece of cake in all directions.

Rich Yea, sometimes I miss a lot of posts as they come pouring in faster than I can read them.

JL.................

epicfail48
09-08-2018, 03:10 AM
Whelp, the tool holder came in a few days ago and i finally found a few moments to fiddle with it:
https://i.imgur.com/x09kKOKm.jpg

Spent a bit of time getting everything aligned and gave her a test go. Initial results are, i like it. I like keeping my tool post square/parallel to the travel anyway, so theres no setup to go through there that i dont already do. Vertical setup was a one-and-done, got the screw set and dont expect to ever have to mess with it. Horizontal setting is as easy as paying attention to the drill and adjusting to get the wobble out, again pretty simple and im not seeing any problems using it on a regular basis.

As far as how it works, pretty well. Got the setup done and took a 1/4ish drill (may have been a #7) to some 1018 scrap to see how it did. End result was it drilled a hole, nothing special. It took about 5 minutes to drill a 2ish inch deep hole, far far better than the tailstock method, feed pressure never felt like i was putting too much force on the carriage handwheel, and retracting fully to clear the chips was an absolute breeze. Nothing dramatic happened, which is exactly what i was hoping would happen, i just got a nice, clean, centered hole.

Just for giggles i did try engaging the leadscrew to drill under power feed. Not the best idea, maybe on a bigger lathe but this thing just doesnt have the beans. Ive got it set for about a .005in/rev feed rate, a touch faster than the .001 per 1/16" of drill recommendation, and the lathe just couldnt do it. I get the feeling that if i were to change the feed back to the .002 per rev i usually keep it at i could use the power feed to drill, but im not sweating not being able to. Works fine as is, i see no need to mess with it

nickel-city-fab
09-08-2018, 04:23 AM
As far as how it works, pretty well. Got the setup done and took a 1/4ish drill (may have been a #7) to some 1018 scrap to see how it did. End result was it drilled a hole, nothing special. It took about 5 minutes to drill a 2ish inch deep hole, far far better than the tailstock method, feed pressure never felt like i was putting too much force on the carriage handwheel, and retracting fully to clear the chips was an absolute breeze. Nothing dramatic happened, which is exactly what i was hoping would happen, i just got a nice, clean, centered hole.


http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/attachment.php?attachmentid=3474&d=1535207640

Cenedd
09-08-2018, 05:36 AM
Well that sounds like yet another thing to add to my must-get-around-to-it queue! Now where did I put that spare chuck?!

Joel
09-08-2018, 02:18 PM
I use a Jacobs taper to straight shank and put it in one of my boring bar holders.

epicfail48
09-08-2018, 06:28 PM
I use a Jacobs taper to straight shank and put it in one of my boring bar holders.

Speaking of that brings up another cheeky point i meant to add, now i have an emergency holder for boring bars :D

mattthemuppet
09-08-2018, 06:33 PM
sweet, I thought you'd like it! One thing that I think would improve mine is if I made a cross slide lock. There's a bit of slop in my cross slide nut, so being able to lock the cross slide would stop that from being an issue. I have found some holes were drilled a bit oversize using the tool post chuck eg. when drilling one size under to ream, the reamer ended up not cutting anything.

754
09-08-2018, 07:52 PM
Simple fast easy cheap method. .
Mount a aluminum block in your 4 way or quickchange, seat parallel to the ways.
Or remove toolpost and insert large block aluminum drilled to fit toolpost bolt and clamp..

Now drill and ream a 1 inch hole in the block. Block should be around 3 inches long and have 1/2 meat or more above reamed 1 inch hole. Now get a turret lathe socket, 1 inch od, M2 inside.
Drill and tap 2 clamping holes av0bove the 1 inch bore, to bind and hold the sleeve when inserted in block.
Now you are ready to drill, used an M2 shank drill chuck or M2 drill bits.

ezduzit
09-08-2018, 07:53 PM
7--sounds like serious misalignment issues.

754
09-08-2018, 08:00 PM
That's because alignment is a breeze with the offset Alloris Chuck as shown. ( not sure of imposters to Aloris)- there is a center hole dead nuts in the back !
The centered hole can also be used if you want the tailstock to assist the cross-slide with a heavy cut by using the tailstock hand feed

You run the tool-post up against the Lathe Chuck to assure the Tool-post is square, Then drop in the Aloris Holder and as you
move the cross-slide to the Lathe's center line, you bring up the tailstock with a center in it and introduce it into the centering hole.
The hole can be used for both height and Y location. Setting the Height ( which never changes !) is a piece of cake . Put a dowel pin in the drill chuck and bring it up to the Lathe chuck and clamp on the pin with a good 3 jaw and lock down the holders height screw for a permanent setting.

One big advantage of the drill chuck holder is for micro boring . You can easily put a micro boring bar in the drill chuck, rather then mess around with shims or spacers in a standard holder......and you know is is on center automatically.
I use mine up to about 5/8 in drill size for metals and larger in plastics in my 10 inch lathe.
When larger, I bore usually or use a larger lathe.

Rich

I had a decent drill Press, 1 hp Baldor.
But my 7.5 hp lathe with power feed drilling us much faster..