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epicfail48
09-17-2018, 10:08 PM
Or should i say MY Sunny 6x18 surface grinder. Ive been looking for one for a while, nothing fancy, just some used old thing for a decent enough price i could justify my hamfisted attempts to learn on. Before anybody gives me crap about how i shouldve been looking for a piece of good ol' american iron, think carefully about whether you want a backyard warrior beating on that ol' american iron...

Anyway ive been keeping an eye on all the usual suspects with no luck, started saving up for Grizzlys annual tent sale hoping id stumble into something for a decent price. Left the tent sale disappointed, as not only was the selection of stuff way, way lower than years past, the prices were higher too. Only 2 grinders there, both priced massively above what i could afford. Went home, did some searching, found a place called Holloway Industrial Sales and waddaya know, they had the aforementioned grinder listed for $750.

Took a trip down there to take a look at it, not fantastic but not horrible either. Name plate dates it to 1984, so its seen some years and a fair bit of use, going off the ways. The wear pattern didnt look bad though, pretty even throughout the ways. Movement was smooth in all axis's, if a little stiff do to inaction and old oil. Spindle spun smooth, no grittiness or anything that i could feel. All in all ive got a good feeling about this one, may be close to the end of its lifespan but should be more than enough tool for me. Plus, a 6x18 is 6 more inches than i was looking for, so that should come in handy.

Picking it up tomorrow, going to take a few days after that to find a spot for it, get everything cleaned up and so on and so forth. Going to get pretty much everything stripped down and cleaned first thing, try to get it looking a little better, have to replace the y axis way covers, might do something with the paint, dunno. More to come!

https://i.imgur.com/WYE4aCEm.jpg
https://i.imgur.com/S84BdUam.jpg
https://i.imgur.com/Iup9UY0m.jpg

Youll have to excuse the crappy pictures, the camera on my phone is a little... lacking. Enough to see by though, ill have some better pictures once its in the shop.

Only downside so far is the 1hp 3-phase motor. No 3-phase in my shop, so a VFD is in my future. I was planning on grabbing one of these:
https://www.automationdirect.com/adc/Shopping/Catalog/Drives/GS1_(120_-z-_230_VAC_V-z-Hz_Control)/GS1_Drive_Units_(120_-z-_230_VAC)/GS1-21P0

Single phase 220 in, 3 phase out to match the motor, seems to me like itd work, though im certainly open to options if anybody has a recommendation

alanganes
09-17-2018, 10:54 PM
Looks like a great place to start, nice score. I have one of those Automation Direct GS1 drives on my old SB milling machine. I use it just as you do, 1 phase in to 3 phase out for a 1HP motor. Not the most sophistocated VFD out there, but inexpensive, works great, and mine has been trouble free for 15 or so years.Worth every penny. AD has great support as well.

754
09-18-2018, 12:05 AM
Nice it will be very handy...

epicfail48
09-18-2018, 12:34 AM
Looks like a great place to start, nice score. I have one of those Automation Direct GS1 drives on my old SB milling machine. I use it just as you do, 1 phase in to 3 phase out for a 1HP motor. Not the most sophistocated VFD out there, but inexpensive, works great, and mine has been trouble free for 15 or so years.Worth every penny. AD has great support as well.

That makes me feel a lot better about pulling the trigger on it then, i was kinda on the fence until someone chimed in. Much appreciated! Be able to get that order put in tonight now, free 2 day shipping too

CPeter
09-18-2018, 08:30 AM
As the owner of 15 Automation Direct VFDs and having installed several more, I like the GS2 series. A very few more dollars, but nicer features. The GS2-11P0 is 120V in and 220V 3 phase out. That allows you to plug it into a regular outlet. I have remote controls on all of mine. You can build one for under $20. I can send you the detailed instructions if you want. The programming is easy and adds to the way they work.
Peter

One of my drill presses with a GS2 11P0 VFD and remote right up front. The readout on the VFD shows actual spindle RPMs
https://i.postimg.cc/cHvHCrXc/IMG_0352a.jpg

reggie_obe
09-18-2018, 10:45 AM
No magnetic chuck or already removed?

Mcgyver
09-18-2018, 11:03 AM
does the table ride on rollers....or a plain bearing surface? Just a reminder that if rollers, and many grinders are, SOP is the table and rollers should be removed for transportation....bouncing along down the road can damage and rollers....and probably will if on a stiff suspension truck

reggie_obe
09-18-2018, 11:50 AM
does the table ride on rollers....or a plain bearing surface? Just a reminder that if rollers, and many grinders are, SOP is the table and rollers should be removed for transportation....bouncing along down the road can damage and rollers....and probably will if on a stiff suspension truck

Even if it's not a roller bearing table it should either be removed or strapped separately to the bearing surface beneath it. Tables are sometimes held on by nothing more than their own weight.

Mcgyver
09-18-2018, 11:56 AM
Even if it's not a roller bearing table it should either be removed or strapped separately to the bearing surface beneath it. Tables are sometimes held on by nothing more than their own weight.

good point

boslab
09-18-2018, 12:40 PM
Old gift cards make good anti denting shims for under rollers (spectrometers use then when you lock the optics for transport too!)
Just slip in under the wheel
Mark

epicfail48
09-18-2018, 02:19 PM
No magnetic chuck or already removed?

Magnetic chuck on there, just hard to see in the photos. Again, sorry about those, a better camera is on my list at some point...


does the table ride on rollers....or a plain bearing surface? Just a reminder that if rollers, and many grinders are, SOP is the table and rollers should be removed for transportation....bouncing along down the road can damage and rollers....and probably will if on a stiff suspension truck

Plain bearing surface, but the table is already going to be riding in the cab of the truck or strapped down separately in the bed. Ive heard one too many horror stories about something going wrong with the table during transport

Mcgyver
09-18-2018, 02:40 PM
sounds like you are all set. Its great having a grinder at hand.....I look forward to some 'camera' photos ( :) ) when you get it home

epicfail48
09-18-2018, 05:29 PM
Whelp, its in the bed of my truck and sitting in my driveway! I say in the bed because while i was watching in joy at the sight of them forklifting it into the bed, i forgot to consider how the **** i was going to get it out...

Finally dug up a spec sheet and turns out the dealer lowballed the weight. He had guessed 5-600lbs, turns out its got a listed shipping weight of 1000lbs, a good 70% of which im guessing is in the stand. All solid cast-iron, that... Im honestly considering welding up a new, somewhat lighter stand for the grinder itself to sit on and sending the base to a farm upstate. I know more weight and mass is better for a machine like this, but at the same time im a little worried for my floors

Mcgyver
09-18-2018, 05:41 PM
If its a concrete floor, keep the base. As you state masses of cast iron do a lot to damp vibrations and might even be precision made (some bases are scraped into the machine so as to give an extra layer against inducing any twist). No one trying to get a great finish with a grinder ever complained it weight too much, and steel can literally ring compared to cast iron's damping properties.

Have you get any lifting equipment? maybe a tow truck wrecker?

epicfail48
09-18-2018, 06:29 PM
If its a concrete floor, keep the base. As you state masses of cast iron do a lot to damp vibrations and might even be precision made (some bases are scraped into the machine so as to give an extra layer against inducing any twist). No one trying to get a great finish with a grinder ever complained it weight too much, and steel can literally ring compared to cast iron's damping properties.

Have you get any lifting equipment? maybe a tow truck wrecker?

Theres the problem, its a wood floor and up a flight of stairs. The planned spot is directly on top of a floor joist and a support beam, but still, a thousand pounds is a lot of weight to have sitting there. Plus, getting it up the stairs and through the door is looking more and more impossible the more i look at it. After dealing with my mini mill and lathe, im NEVER going to even think about complaining about more rigidity and weight dampening, but at the same time i have to be realistic with what i can do.

My tentative plan right now is to scrap the base and weld up a solid base in its place. My justification for that is A) the base isnt in the best shape anyway, paints chipping, a few rust spots, found a crack in the casting, B) a steel base would better fit my current shop situation, at the expense of some dampening from the lower weight, and C) in the future if my shop situation changes the grinder would be easier to move to its new home, and if the new home allows it the base could be filled with concrete or something to gain that weight back.

Ill sit on the decision for a bit though, theres a lot of work to be done on the machine itself after all. Ill get it cleaned up, working, up and running on the bench first, then work on figuring out a stand. All said though, welding up a steel stand does look to my eyes like it would be the best option, and it seems to work for other people. Stefan Gotteswinter, for example, did something similar with his smaller grinder, and it seemed to work alright:
http://gtwr.de/shop/pro_lip515/newmachine.html

Forgot to mention, the base of the tool is held to the stand with 4 bolts. If it were lapped to the base i probably wouldnt even be considering making a new one. Then again, if it were lapped to the base i probably couldntve afforded it...

Dan_the_Chemist
09-18-2018, 09:35 PM
Theres the problem, its a wood floor and up a flight of stairs. The planned spot is directly on top of a floor joist and a support beam, but still, a thousand pounds is a lot of weight to have sitting there. Plus, getting it up the stairs and through the door is looking more and more impossible the more i look at it.

Give ya $100 and I'll take the problem off of your hands. The whole problem, not just the base.

754
09-18-2018, 10:02 PM
Set up downstairs end of problem. .
I don't mind the smells of a machine shop, but never had to try to sleep inhaling that... too often..

epicfail48
09-19-2018, 12:49 AM
Set up downstairs end of problem. .
I don't mind the smells of a machine shop, but never had to try to sleep inhaling that... too often..

My options are either up a flight of stairs to the main floor, or down a flight to the basement that floods sometimes. I dont like keeping machine tools in the basement either, crappy light and high humidity. Leaving the woodworking tools down there is bad enough...


Give ya $100 and I'll take the problem off of your hands. The whole problem, not just the base.

Multiply that by 9 and ill turn a profit!

epicfail48
09-19-2018, 04:06 AM
Picture time, for the last update of the day! Got most of the parts unloaded and piled up in a spare corner, the cabinet and actual tool base are still strapped in the bed of my truck due to lacking heavy moving tools. Struck out at the first Harbor Freight i went to to grab a hydraulic table, going to head to the second in town to grab one tomorrow to safely move at least the tool base. Between the size and weight theres just no way for one person to move that thing, and im somewhat lacking in warm bodies... Table was a bit of an unexpected expense, but im sure itll come in handy for a lot else, and the cost of the table is less than the cost of the mag chuck i was expecting to need to buy. Anyway, better pictures of the pieces i got inside!

https://i.imgur.com/ueDmDzWl.jpg
Pile o Parts. Got the column, table, mag chuck, few guards and some other stuff layed out
https://i.imgur.com/awTjm9Um.jpg
Close up of the column assembly. Pretty good shape, all things considered. Filthy though
https://i.imgur.com/YydBWRXm.jpg
https://i.imgur.com/3YN7RZcm.jpg
Table top and bottom. Again, fair shape, filthy as all hell though.

Quick oneovers havent revealed anything the pre-purchase look didnt. Parts are very dirty, theres a good bit of wear to match the age, but nothing horribly alarming. All the moving parts run as smooth as you can expect something thats been sitting for a while to move, theres not really any rust at all, surface or otherwise, nor cracks, chips, a few dings maybe. Spindle feels relatively smooth, it does feel like the bearings are pretty close to the end of their lives but to my feel they should have a fair bit left in them, especially for hobby use. The biggest thing ive noticed so far has been wear on the X axis ways, theres a fair bit of wear in those, but pretty consistent wear, again to my untrained eye. Still some of the factory scraping/flaking on the base half of the ways, but not a horrible amount. Again, close to the end of service life, but not close enough for me to be worried just yet.

The ways on the table are a little weird, looks like theres some turcite (?) on those, and thats definitely seen better days. Its peeling in a few spots and showing some pretty deep wear lines, though strangely the table movement is still amazingly smooth. Yet to be seen how much of a problem thatll be, but ill cross that bridge when i come to it.

Havent been able to do very much in the way of precise measurement, like indicating off the table and all that jazz to get a better feel for the wear. Slight complication in measuring when you cant move half the tool! I did go ahead and pop the wheel hub off (an adventure of itself, as i didnt realize the retaining nut was a left-hand and the taper did not want to let go) and get a dti on the spindle. Not even a wiggle on the needle, i feel like thats a pretty good sign.

Overall im cautiously optimistic. As mentioned all the movement surfaces are surprisingly smooth, and all the various bits seem to be in good order. Ill be working on tearing everything down and getting it cleaned up and reassembled for a while yet, big machine and lots of pieces (and dirt) after all. So far on the project list are giving everything a very thorough scrub, replace the way covers, rework the electrical system to function off a VFD and do something about a stand. For that second to last one, im thinking about bypassing the original switch altogether wire everything straight to the vfd, giving that 'everything' is just the motor. The last one im even less sure about, so far the frontrunning idea is to scrap the original cabinet and fabricate a new, somewhat lighter stand to better fit my shop. Down the line though, ill cross that bridge when i come to it.

Ill be keeping a photo log in an Imgur album, in case anybody wants to see more. The more interesting stuff ill still post here, but most of it ill just leave in the album so as not to be posting a few dozen pictures
https://imgur.com/a/Wj9746p

boslab
09-19-2018, 07:54 AM
Contrary to popular belief, you don’t need a mag slab to grind, honest, imagine a 15’ mag chuck on a 25 table, not happening
Mark

Joe Rogers
09-19-2018, 09:21 AM
Before you scrap or supercede the CI base, what is the area of the base? It may well fall in to the sq ft load limit for floors. And a 3/4” slab of ply bigger than the base could probably spread out the load enough to span a marginal calculated load excess. People put huge ( read heavy ) gunsafes on upper floors all the time
Joe

epicfail48
09-19-2018, 05:49 PM
Acquired a hydraulic table, finally got the machine base out and moved into what was formerly my dining room. My shop space has been slowly bleeding into it for a year and a half now, think its time to just call it the tertiary shop. Pictures of that:
https://i.imgur.com/n06GXodm.jpg

And a close up of the ways:
https://i.imgur.com/l9pdATXm.jpg

Decidedly near end-of-life, but still enough life left in them for me to play with. As mentioned, even wear across the surface with no spots that stick out as obviously having more wear to them. Filthy as all hell though. Now i just get to take everything apart and scrub it down, should be fun! More to come there.

Still on the fence about the base. The more i look at it the more im thinking the only way its moving out of my truck is on someone elses forklift, getting it out and in position in my house is looking more and more impossible. Ill sit on it for about a week and make my decision then, but im thinking a fabricated steel stand fits my situation better

epicfail48
09-21-2018, 10:18 PM
Quick update, the VFD came in yesterday, found some time this evening to get the motor hooked up just to make sure everything ran properly. Probably shouldve parked the column a little closer to a 220v outlet, but hindsight sucks sometimes. Anyway, not only does the motor run, it purrs. With the column assemble just sitting on a pallet, without a wheel on the spindle of course, you have to try very, very hard to feel a hint of vibration, most of which can be chalked up to 30 years of crap on everything.

Needless to say, im a very happy camper right now. Now i just have to start cleaning the base

epicfail48
09-22-2018, 02:36 AM
Another quick-fire, got very barely started on the cleaning of the base. All i can say is holy crap this thing is filthy!
https://i.imgur.com/MusNUP7.jpg
After a bit of cleaning

https://i.imgur.com/w0KWDL8.jpg
Pile of parts formerly attached to the base

Really this confirmed a lot of what i already expected; the machine probably hasnt been cleaned since it was built, has seen some pretty heavy use, but nothing throwing up serious alarm bells. The wear on a few parts did come close, for example the y axis leadscrew is so heavily worn in the center that i thought it was a 60 degree thread until saw the acme threads near the ends. Filing that under "problem for another time", i figure that precise Y movements arent as important on a grinder as they would be on a mill, at least for flattening the somethings ill be working on. Maybe in the future ill look into replacing that, but not at the moment.

Cleaning is going to be quite the job, theres 30 years of grease and grit caked on 1/4" thick in places. Getting it to budge is really making me consider pulling anything electrical, setting in on the back porch and going at it with a power washer, though the fear of rust shuts that one down. Wistful thinking i guess.

Last note for the night, ive pretty much decided that the cabinet is going. I understand all the positives, but the reality of the situation is the weight and size make it far too much to work for my situation, so its just got to go. In its place im going to fabricate a stand, likely out of some thick-wall 1x2 or 2x3 tubing. If i play it right i can use the proceeds from the base to get the materials for the new one

MushCreek
09-22-2018, 06:31 AM
A little late to help you now, but I would have bought an engine hoist (cherry picker) to move this and other machines. I dragged home a Bridgeport mill a few months ago and loaded and unloaded it with my cherry picker. It has enough travel to set it on the floor. I've moved many mills, lathes, and grinders with it over the years.

If at all possible, I would keep the cast base.

J Tiers
09-22-2018, 10:17 AM
Acquired a hydraulic table, finally got the machine base out and moved into what was formerly my dining room. My shop space has been slowly bleeding into it for a year and a half now, think its time to just call it the tertiary shop. .......

Yowza..... That's gonna be one dirty wood floor...... You must not have a basement.

epicfail48
09-22-2018, 02:02 PM
Yowza..... That's gonna be one dirty wood floor...... You must not have a basement.

Not one I can get tools into easily. Or one that doesn't occasionally flood, for that matter. The floor around the grinder is going to get covered so keep it from getting too dirty, either by lying down a piece of plywood or some canvas dropcloths.

Mush, I did consider an engine hoist but it was a touch outside the budget. Maybe next time I have a giant tool to move!

epicfail48
09-29-2018, 03:59 AM
Back with an action report!

Had to take a break from cleaning as i wanted to get the stand situation figured out first. Im reassembling as things get cleaned because the assembled machine is too heavy to move easily, didnt want to get everything back together only to take it apart to get it on the stand. I did end up writing off the original cabinet, the logistics of getting it moved into place, cleaned up, etc just didnt work out for my situation. I ended up welding a new frame from some tube steel, and i know that i sacrificed mass and vibration dampening doing so, but at least this way i have something i can actually used. Way i see it, that last part is the most important. Plus, going this route gave me some welding practice, something i could really use. Went well though, i actually got some welds im not completely horrified by the idea of someone else seeing!

Some of the best pictures from this batch:
https://i.imgur.com/crozWEol.jpg
Cleaned up base, with one-shot oiler

https://i.imgur.com/RkLBY24l.jpg
Quick look at the new stand

https://i.imgur.com/9IlT1j9l.jpg
What may be the nicest weld ive ever laid. Still looks like crap though

Still need to get the oiler re-installed before anything, its got hoses running through the base of the tool so if i put it off ill end up needing to disassemble everything later. Already drained and flushed the oiler itself, need to get it reconnected to the lines and then im planning on flushing all the lines out as well. There was some mystery oil filling the oiler, it was old, filthy and moisture-contaminated, dont want that stuck in the lines pushing god knows what onto the ways. After thats put together, im going to keep moving my way up, starting with the saddle, then the table, then the column, and finally the electronics to wrap everything up

Erich
09-29-2018, 07:42 PM
I love seeing old iron come back to life. Tip of the cap to you sir.
If there is a lady of the house present she qualifies as a saint. I don't even want to contemplate the consequences of commandeering the dining room for machine tool degreasing.

J Tiers
09-29-2018, 07:52 PM
I love seeing old iron come back to life. Tip of the cap to you sir.
If there is a lady of the house present she qualifies as a saint. I don't even want to contemplate the consequences of commandeering the dining room for machine tool degreasing.

LOL...

My wife , in a previous life, actually participated in disassembly, cleaning, and rebuilding of a VW engine in the living room of an apartment...... Not while I was in the picture, though........ She also rebuilt at least one car with her father long ago, in that case out in the garage.....

Mcgyver
09-29-2018, 08:35 PM
If there is a lady of the house present

There can't be. Either that or Epic is a leading candidate for caveman of the year

bborr01
09-29-2018, 11:13 PM
Are you going to paint it before you put it back together?

epicfail48
09-30-2018, 01:45 PM
I love seeing old iron come back to life. Tip of the cap to you sir.
If there is a lady of the house present she qualifies as a saint. I don't even want to contemplate the consequences of commandeering the dining room for machine tool degreasing.

The previous lady of the house cleared out all the furniture while I was at work and had her parents break it off with me. Taught me a very valuable lesson, the tools are worth more...

epicfail48
09-30-2018, 01:46 PM
Are you going to paint it before you put it back together?

Wasn't planning on it no. The original paint is in decent enough condition and I'm not going for a restore, just a cleanup. We're this a better quality tool or in better shape I'd consider it, but I don't see the benefit here

epicfail48
10-03-2018, 04:50 AM
Finally have some big progress! The one-shot oiler threw up a bit of a roadblock; removing it meant cutting a line and replacing a fitting. Turns out, that was a stupid idea, because i may as well have tossed the entire oiler out the window for how hard the fitting was to replace... 3 hardware stores, 3 industrial plumbing supply places, 2 auto stores, and Grainger, none of them had the bloody fitting, an inverted flare fitting. Heck, none of them had 1/8" O.D tubing for that matter. Even McMaster didnt have the fitting, and when McMaster doesnt have something you know youre boned. So, i had to improvise:
https://i.imgur.com/l2mlUfG.jpg

Ended up using some 1/4" tubing to go from the oiler to the tee, replaced the fittings at the tee and the oiler to a 5/16 thread to push connector, and made a tee. Got lucky, i had a bar of 1/2" 1018 that ended up being workable. Took a few attempts to make something that would play right with the remaining inverted flare connectors, but i ended up getting it working. I may have to revisit it in the future, after all its made of mild steel and im nothing short of amazed that it even works, let alone that it works without leaks, but im not going to question it. Wouldnt do something like this for the brakes on my car but for here, it should be fine. Oiler reinstalled:
https://i.imgur.com/eUnoQZ7.jpg

Now that ive got the oiler reinstalled i can start bolting stuff back in place and getting the big stuff clean. As mentioned, im working my way up, next on the list was getting the saddle cleaned and reinstalled:
https://i.imgur.com/WcC4ExB.jpg

Quite the adventure getting that scrubbed out and put back together, the X axis shaft had a lot more bearings than i was expecting, and they were pretty filthy. Cleaned up alright though. Whole saddle did really, for how filthy it was. Getting everything cleaned off gave me a better look at these ways at well:
https://i.imgur.com/WCjRGl5.jpg

Same as on the rest of the machine really, a lot of wear, but nothing that jumps out and screams "PROBLEM", at least not to my eyes. Last legs, sure, but the wear is pretty even along the distance of the ways, with the edges and center seemingly showing the same amounts of wear. I know that just looking at is like that is pretty imprecise, especially for a machine like this, but ill save the accurate testing for later.

Next up ill be working on the table, which ironically looks like one of the cleanest parts on this machine. Funny how that works out... As always, theres more pictures in the Imgur album, different angles and the like, just cant dump everything here

epicfail48
10-07-2018, 02:27 AM
https://i.imgur.com/UMOgoDp.jpg

Busy week! Got the table cleaned up, installed, all the hardware put back together, then got the column cleaned and bolted back on. Ill confess i may have skimped a bit on cleaning the column by not fully disassembling the spindle, but my excuse there is i was afraid of breaking something on the spindle. Ill revisit that if it becomes a problem, dont think it will though. Have some guards left to clean up, get those reinstalled, mess with the electrical system and then were off to the races!

Speaking of races, anybody care to recommend a good general-purpose grinding wheel? I know im looking for a 7 inch wheel with a 1 1/4" hole, 1/2" wide, probably 46 grit, beyond that im a little lost. Intended use would be carbon steel with maybe some cast iron mixed in. From what i understand steel and cast iron require different abrasive types for best results, but im perfectly happy to get 'good' results on both, instead of 'excellent' on one or the other. At least for now, that is

epicfail48
10-13-2018, 02:40 AM
Hit the big milestone, everything is cleaned up, reassembled and tested!
https://i.imgur.com/IBugCXA.jpg

Got all the guards and shields reinstalled, she may not look perfect but better than where i started. Still need to get the VFD in an enclosure secured to the stand, as well as move the machine to its final spot and get electrical run to it. As it is, ive got an extension cord running to it to get everything powered up. Did some playing around with it, and so far everything is going decently:
https://i.imgur.com/BMvUQUB.jpg

Pretty crap surface finish, but given im running an unknown pedigree wheel (i did ring check it and run it slow for a while before anything, for safeties sake) without doing much to true it i think it came out alright. I wanted to see how close it came to flat more than anything else. Turns out, pretty flat! As a quick, first order check i ground the plate (1/4" mild steel), then set the ground surface on my surface plate and tried slipping some .001" shim stock under it. Didnt go in anywhere, so im pretty confident in saying that its at least flat to a thou.

I did also set one of my plates on the table and check that against a DTI. Had to shim up one side, just to get the 2 edges at the same height. On the bride side, that pointed out that the mag chuck isnt parallel to the ways, good to know i think. Anyway, once everything was shimmed, the DTI barely flickered when i cranked the table, so it seems like i should be able to grind some flat parts with this thing!

Got orders placed with McMaster and KBC tools for some new goodies. A new grinding wheel was first up, dont quite trust the one i have. I ended up going with one of the Ruby wheels someone advocated in another thread, for $20 it seemed like a decent experiment. Also ordered in one of those truing sticks and a gallon of Vactra #2, so hopefully by early next week ill be able to really play around with this thing

MushCreek
10-13-2018, 05:34 AM
I assume you know that the chuck needs to be ground. No shims; make sure both surfaces are clean and burr free, bolt it down in place, and very gently grind it flat using some oil. Indicate the back rail in before clamping it down. It's tricky to grind a chuck- they heat up very easily. Any residual heat at all will result in it not being perfectly flat. It's a slow process if you have more then a few ten-thousandths to take off. I'd be surprised (and a little concerned) if the chuck is out by much, unless it's never been ground in to that machine. I always check the grinder table without the chuck first to make sure things are all right.

epicfail48
10-13-2018, 02:07 PM
I assume you know that the chuck needs to be ground. No shims; make sure both surfaces are clean and burr free, bolt it down in place, and very gently grind it flat using some oil. Indicate the back rail in before clamping it down. It's tricky to grind a chuck- they heat up very easily. Any residual heat at all will result in it not being perfectly flat. It's a slow process if you have more then a few ten-thousandths to take off. I'd be surprised (and a little concerned) if the chuck is out by much, unless it's never been ground in to that machine. I always check the grinder table without the chuck first to make sure things are all right.

Yup, that was on the list. I'm going to save that for after I get a bit more comfortable with the machine though, practice on the cheap stuff before moving on to the big expensive bit. The table on the machine itself shows a similar issue, I believe I measured the right most side at .0015" higher than the left. Problem to solve some other time, right now I'm just happy that the surface plate test indicated I could get a flat surface

epicfail48
10-20-2018, 04:22 AM
Alrighty, this will probably be the last status update i post on the clean-up and setup efforts on my grinder! One of these days ill get around to finishing up the wiring and move the grinder to its final home, but for now ive been doing a lot of playing around with it. I ended up skimming the top of the table, it wasnt flat or parallel to the ways and you could tell that at some point in its life it had seen some rust that messed up the surface. I figured i could either skim off the table a bit, or take a lot more off the top of the mag chuck, and skimming the table seemed like a smarter option. Came out alright, certainly functional.

I did also find out that when i remounted the column it was stupid to think that it would go back in alignment. Took a lot of wondering why i kept dressing an angle onto the wheel before i figured i should get an indicator on the spindle face to see if the wheel was in line with the x-axis. Surprising nobody, it wasnt, quick fix there though, just actually align everything. If only i could get parts to do that... Im still in the process of figuring out how to properly dress the wheel, i think im getting pretty close though. Getting decent looking surfaces at any rate, though i am getting some very slight ripples that i feel comfortable attributing to the spindle bearings more than anything. Ive been tossing a bunch of random stuff on the chuck just trying to get a feel for the machine. So far the only feel that ive got is im way out of my depth. Seeing someone else doing it it seems pretty simple, twist some wheels and hey presto, flat part with a good finish. So far ive made a bunch of dust, several concave surfaces, a few convex surfaces, and one piece that actually floated on a surface plate. Really wish i knew how i did that last one... Piece of square steel tubing and it came out with a really nice finish and made a lovely vacuum against the plate.

Going to be playing with scrap a lot before starting any projects, once i can reliably produce a flat surface ill work on getting things parallel. Maybe get some 01, make myself a set of parallels. Possibly a straight edge or two. After that ive got a big old hunk of durabar ill probably slice a few blocks out of, make some 1-2-3 blocks. All in the future though, plenty to work on now. Still need to order in something for a coolant mist, can only help id imagine

Mcgyver
10-20-2018, 08:37 AM
I assume you know that the chuck needs to be ground. No shims; make sure both surfaces are clean and burr free, bolt it down in place, and very gently grind it flat using some oil. Indicate the back rail in before clamping it down. It's tricky to grind a chuck- they heat up very easily. Any residual heat at all will result in it not being perfectly flat. It's a slow process if you have more then a few ten-thousandths to take off. I'd be surprised (and a little concerned) if the chuck is out by much, unless it's never been ground in to that machine. I always check the grinder table without the chuck first to make sure things are all right.

and don't forget to grind it with the mag on. This is a job much easier done with flood, the wheel will want to load up with the softer metal and you have to keep the chuck at a constant temp....maybe the oil Mush mentions will help with the loading, but heat is a real problem, especially for the chuck grind, which determines the accuracy of all that follows.

I know you can do without, I started dry grinding, but when I installed flood, its so much better I've got a bit of zeal toward promoting it lol

epicfail48
10-20-2018, 06:38 PM
and don't forget to grind it with the mag on. This is a job much easier done with flood, the wheel will want to load up with the softer metal and you have to keep the chuck at a constant temp....maybe the oil Mush mentions will help with the loading, but heat is a real problem, especially for the chuck grind, which determines the accuracy of all that follows.

I know you can do without, I started dry grinding, but when I installed flood, its so much better I've got a bit of zeal toward promoting it lol

Much as id like to, floods not really in the cards for me. Theres the mess, the cost for all the extra plumbing and pumps and whatnot, and the fact that this is a machine id turn on maybe once a week, so id have to contend with potentially rancid coolant. Much easier for my situation to use the mister i already have and mix up a bottle of coolant as needed, not quite as good but workable, or so ive been told