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JoeLee
09-26-2018, 05:02 PM
A small bottle of upholstery tacks, square nuts and screws cost 10 cents, and you could buy a small 7 ft. roll of solder??

https://i.postimg.cc/dDzLFXRs/IMG_20180926_133338.jpg (https://postimg.cc/dDzLFXRs)

When paint and stain came in half pints, 1/4 pints and some even smaller??

https://i.postimg.cc/LJVXz8c5/IMG_20180926_133640.jpg (https://postimg.cc/LJVXz8c5)

JL.................

10KPete
09-26-2018, 05:18 PM
Yes, I do remember. And I very much miss 'em. I'm told it's progress.....

Pete

J Tiers
09-26-2018, 05:29 PM
Yep..... And all of it was made in USA (or whatever home country is). Now you can't, and tacks, bolts and screws are all made offshore.

OTOH, the 10 cents was really about a buck in equivalent buying power.

Dave C
09-26-2018, 06:29 PM
Yep..... And all of it was made in USA (or whatever home country is). Now you can't, and tacks, bolts and screws are all made offshore.

OTOH, the 10 cents was really about a buck in equivalent buying power.

My first machining job in 1964, was running a turret lathe for $2.05 per hour. Of course, that kind of money would buy two 1 inch thick T bone steaks at the meat market. I looked at a package of 3 steaks the other day that were a few cents short of $40.

gambler
09-26-2018, 06:38 PM
My first machining job in 1964, was running a turret lathe for $2.05 per hour. Of course, that kind of money would buy two 1 inch thick T bone steaks at the meat market. I looked at a package of 3 steaks the other day that were a few cents short of $40.

they had steaks back then?:p

wierdscience
09-26-2018, 06:48 PM
Back when even "cheap" tools were good?My first electric drill was a B&D 1/4" drill,the ones with the pea soup green case.Cost $8.88 at the local TG&Y.34 years later I still have it and it still works.

Glug
09-26-2018, 06:57 PM
they had steaks back then?:p

Ribs too.

https://lisagawlas.files.wordpress.com/2013/09/flinstone.jpg?w=500

gambler
09-26-2018, 06:59 PM
hahaha yah yum huh

Arcane
09-26-2018, 07:09 PM
Back when even "cheap" tools were good?My first electric drill was a B&D 1/4" drill,the ones with the pea soup green case.Cost $8.88 at the local TG&Y.34 years later I still have it and it still works.

I'm still using a 45 years old 3/8" B&D drill.

J Tiers
09-26-2018, 07:16 PM
Back when even "cheap" tools were good?My first electric drill was a B&D 1/4" drill,the ones with the pea soup green case.Cost $8.88 at the local TG&Y.34 years later I still have it and it still works.

Had one oof those also. And the prior V/S metal cased one with gray plastic handle.

The pea soup green one was really high speed / small capacity (1/4"), and IIRC it was disposed of years ago. I still have the metal cased one, also a 1/4" shank.

jdedmon91
09-26-2018, 08:13 PM
Back when even "cheap" tools were good?My first electric drill was a B&D 1/4" drill,the ones with the pea soup green case.Cost $8.88 at the local TG&Y.34 years later I still have it and it still works.

I remember TG&Y


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Arcane
09-26-2018, 11:00 PM
Somehow this song seems appropriate for this thread. :)


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Rgqzb-u6Q0c

rustdreamer
09-26-2018, 11:40 PM
Seeing the picture of the Earls reminds me when people dressed to go to church, take the wife out, or even travel. Now many "normal" folks look like the homeless. Yeah, I'm an old dude!
"

darryl
09-27-2018, 01:33 AM
I remember coffee being 5 cents a cup- and my dad reluctantly raising the price from 10 cents to 12 cents when the cost of coffee beans went up yet again. A glass of beer was 50 cents, a burger 33 cents, fries were about 20 cents.

In another part of the world, a gourmet chicken sandwich was 25 cents, a good wage was 128 dollars a month. Coinage was such that a nickel had to be divided in half so that proper change could be made. I saw a relatively huge and stunningly beautiful emerald that could have been had for $300. One of the best things you could buy was ice cream bars and popsicle-like sticks. The best was banana-milk-ice, which was 6 cents. Most of that stuff was 4 cents.

I remember fuel being sold for 45 cents a gallon. A drink, chips, and a movie went from 25 cents to 35 cents around '60 or so. The 74 was the big Harley, and its little brother was the 45.

PStechPaul
09-27-2018, 02:07 AM
In the '60s, I remember when Gino's and McDonald's hamburgers were about 12 cents and fries were 7 cents. My first job (1965?) paid $1.25/hr as a draftsman/illustrator. In 1970 I drove cross-country with four other people, and IIRC the cheapest gas was about 29 cents/gallon in Fargo, ND, and highest was about 60 cents, maybe in CA. My parents bought a 3 BR townhouse in Towson in 1963 for about $11,000, and I sold it in 2005 for $220,000. My first apartment was about $130/mo in 1973, and rent went up every year to $140, $150, $165, and finally $177. I bought my first house, a duplex on 1 acre, in 1977, for $17,500, paying an owner-financed mortgage at $158/mo, and my tenants paid me $25/week plus they mowed the lawn. I think I was earning about $5/hour at that time as an electronics technician.

Dave C
09-27-2018, 02:15 AM
they had steaks back then?:p

Yeah, and they were tender because they came from grain fed steers. Unlike the tough, grass fed crap of today.

Jim Williams
09-27-2018, 05:25 AM
Multiply those cheap gasoline prices we so fondly remember by the 10X inflation rate since about 1972, and you will find that gasoline is less expensive today than ever before. Especially considering that pump prices usually include more tax.

boslab
09-27-2018, 06:50 AM
Suppose it’s the basis of the stock market, buy cheap, sit on it and sell when it goes up, 2 guys I knew filled a garage with copper pipe and fittings in the 70s, “retirement fund”, sold in the 90s for a couple of million, that’s what I call clever though unlike food it won’t spoil (I should imagine oxidation a problem!)
I remember the price of £1 coins being more in scrap than face value, many were melted!
Time is a strange thing, oh to travel back to do my shopping
Mark

flylo
09-27-2018, 07:31 AM
Multiply those cheap gasoline prices we so fondly remember by the 10X inflation rate since about 1972, and you will find that gasoline is less expensive today than ever before. Especially considering that pump prices usually include more tax.

6X is closer & still works out close as I remember hunting change & bottles in 1975 to buy a gallon for 57 cents. http://www.in2013dollars.com/1972-dollars-in-2018

rmcphearson
09-27-2018, 07:37 AM
What ever happened to Johnny Mac Brown and nickers to your knees?

Tungsten dipper
09-27-2018, 08:09 AM
Remember.... Party lines, incinerators & burning your own trash, 19 cent MacDonald hamburgers and playing cards in your spokes? Oh yeah, M-80's and cherry bombs? I'm amazed I'm here alive. Can remember throwing a cherry bomb in a trash can and sitting on the lid. Trash cans were built a lot better back then.

Ridgerunner
09-27-2018, 08:58 AM
Remember before electricity kerosene lamps and coal furnace. After electric came in everyone would gather around the radio and listen to shows and music. When television became popular the sets were something like 10 or 12 inch. We had one that had a very large magnifying glass in front of the screen that slid in a track on top to magnify the picture lol. Television was live then with only one station and would go off the air between 11:30 PM and 7AM with just a test pattern showing.

J Tiers
09-27-2018, 09:44 AM
Multiply those cheap gasoline prices we so fondly remember by the 10X inflation rate since about 1972, and you will find that gasoline is less expensive today than ever before. Especially considering that pump prices usually include more tax.

Yes, a fact folks forget, or have no clue about. Paid 45 cents on the reservation in NM, back in 1972 or so, which would be considerably more than the $2.45 I paid recently if converted to today's pricing.

We had a basement incinerator, and open burning of leaves and trash was normal. "Not no more", as the saying goes.

mattthemuppet
09-27-2018, 10:26 AM
ah, the good old days. When dudes died from congestive heart failure in their 50s and a car crash was most likely a death certificate. When they paid you to fill up your car and it was downhill to AND from school.

Rose tinted glasses chaps. We've never had it as good as we have it now and it'll almost certainly be even better in the future.

Oh, and inflation's a b!tch.

Robg
09-27-2018, 10:39 AM
I clearly remember getting our first TV. Which is to say that prior to this there was no TV in our house ever. There was only one channel to begin with but eventually there were a couple more. And yes, it went off air around midnight with the ubiquitous test pattern but in other areas there was just static. Sadly, I'm sure there are very few of us out there that can relate this experience.
Also , I remember once my mother gave my younger sister a dollar to go to the store and she spent the whole dollar instead of just ten cents or so and bring back the change. Mom hit the roof and dragged my sister back to the store & returned the excess. Man was she mad! Which shows again back in the old days, children could run freely in the neighborhood without fear. Today, not so much.

A.K. Boomer
09-27-2018, 10:54 AM
Wow you guys bring back some memories - and are making me feel old so stop it ! lol

for me it was "big wheels" those plastic trikes as a little kid, sting ray 5 speed bikes with "center console shift" and a slick on the back lol did not corner worth a damn,,, we did put cards on the fork to contact the spokes and thought we were cool, banana seats lol riding three on a bike - two on the banana seat and one on the handlebars

I do remember TV's tuning out with that test pattern. and if you were a kid who had an inventor streak you would have to send for catalogs and order special stuff - sometimes would take months of anticipation,,, now it's get on line and it's in your mailbox the next day --- tell me that has not sped up the inventing process a little lol

J.Ramsey
09-27-2018, 01:22 PM
1974 my junior year in high school my Dad bought a Kennedy 520 Chest and matching lower cabinet to keep his mics, calipers and other precision stuff he used for his reloading hobby.
1975 he retired and we moved to Kansas and it was placed on his work bench in the basement. He moved off the farm 2002 and I bought the place, he told me to keep the chest so to this day they still sit there empty doing nothing but collecting dust.

Pic of chest.

https://i.imgur.com/EsKhAP3.jpg
Invoice from MSC

https://i.imgur.com/LIL2COP.jpg
From Kennedy website today. over $700 increase and I doubt the quality is near as good.

https://i.imgur.com/TEjhAB5.png

A.K. Boomer
09-27-2018, 01:32 PM
WOW now that's a price change !

lakeside53
09-27-2018, 01:39 PM
heck, my first two cars had vacuum windscreen wiper motors. Sucked going up a medium length incline, perfect for the mountains in heavy rain ;)

AD5MB
09-27-2018, 02:06 PM
I paid $75 for my first car, a 61 corvair. Katrina came along, and I paid $75 for a tank of gas, and I realized I'm old

gas cost $.28 a gallon when I bought that car, and I made $2.20 an hour. today, gas is $2.89 per gallon, and when I retired I made $22 an hour

now I can't find a car barely worth having for less than $5000, or a motorcycle I would trust with an 11 mile trip to town for less than $2500. a ride worth having starts at $10,000 and $5,000, used. I don't know how young people get by.

PStechPaul
09-27-2018, 05:42 PM
When I was in high school, Jack Purcell sneakers were the rage, and probably cost as much as $10. I got $5 knock-offs. That was still a couple hours labor. But now you pay $600 for worn-out, duct-taped sneakers. Who can afford that?

https://www.usatoday.com/story/money/nation-now/2016/08/30/barneys-new-york-outrage-social-media-over-600-duct-tape-designer-shoes/89577374/

https://pbs.twimg.com/media/CrEWpOIWYAA-ncU.jpg

The blue jeans I wore then were probably about $5. Now you pay $174 for ripped up jeans (https://us.asos.com/women/jeans/ripped-jeans/cat/?cid=19823):

https://images.asos-media.com/products/one-teaspoon-awesome-baggies-high-waisted-straight-leg-jeans-with-rips/9406401-1-bluestorm?$XL$?$XXL$&wid=300&fmt=jpeg&qlt=80,0&op_sharpen=0&resMode=sharp2&op_usm=1,0.4,6,1&iccEmbed=0&printRes=72

A.K. Boomer
09-27-2018, 05:53 PM
She's hot - does she come with the jeans?

A.K. Boomer
09-27-2018, 05:56 PM
we used to wear bell bottoms lol and levi's had a thing called "elephant bell bottoms" lol and man if you sprung for a set of those you were groovy for sure lol ok - im embarrassed now...

J Tiers
09-27-2018, 06:04 PM
WOW now that's a price change !

Less than it might seem.

When yo figure the 10x inflation factor, PLUS the fact that the chests were made in volume then (but much less so now), back when machinists and other tool-users were employed, instead of being fired... The price change of about 14x or so seems just about in line with most prices.

Tungsten dipper
09-27-2018, 06:20 PM
I found my Dads "packing slip" (with no price) for his 520 Kennedy tool box; it was received September 20, 1957. It was taken out of his pay when he worked at Sunstrad.

nc5a
09-28-2018, 02:19 AM
I remember making $62.50 every two weeks at my first duty station in the Air Force. Gas was 25 cents a gallon in Portland OR in 1960. I made $1.85/hr in 1967 and that was big money for a kid working in a bowling alley and pool hall. I remember shop class in 6th grade which was the first year you could take shop class. We had table saws, bandsaws, metal and wood lathes, wood planers, sheet metal tools, foundry tools and a first class shop teacher. I remember him grabbing a kid that was fooling around with a wood chisel and slamming him against the wall. He taught that kid and the rest of us an important lesson. Today he would be charged with assault and that would be a bummer. I remember mom & pop hardware stores, they seemed to have everything and if not would be glad to get it for you. I miss the old days and the old ways.

vpt
09-28-2018, 08:45 AM
I remember the hardware stores having an upstairs and sometimes a downstairs.

JoeLee
09-28-2018, 09:16 AM
WOW now that's a price change !Yea, and not to mention how the quality has diminished as the price has increased.

JL.................

JoeLee
09-28-2018, 09:18 AM
When I was in high school, Jack Purcell sneakers were the rage, and probably cost as much as $10. I got $5 knock-offs. That was still a couple hours labor. But now you pay $600 for worn-out, duct-taped sneakers. Who can afford that?

https://www.usatoday.com/story/money/nation-now/2016/08/30/barneys-new-york-outrage-social-media-over-600-duct-tape-designer-shoes/89577374/

https://pbs.twimg.com/media/CrEWpOIWYAA-ncU.jpg

The blue jeans I wore then were probably about $5. Now you pay $174 for ripped up jeans (https://us.asos.com/women/jeans/ripped-jeans/cat/?cid=19823):

https://images.asos-media.com/products/one-teaspoon-awesome-baggies-high-waisted-straight-leg-jeans-with-rips/9406401-1-bluestorm?$XL$?$XXL$&wid=300&fmt=jpeg&qlt=80,0&op_sharpen=0&resMode=sharp2&op_usm=1,0.4,6,1&iccEmbed=0&printRes=72Hey Paul..... you weren't wearing those pink sneakers were you??

JL...............

3 Phase Lightbulb
09-28-2018, 10:01 AM
I remember when it seemed like I'd never fill up my Apple II's 20mb Corvus Systems hard disk. I remember when my 300bps modem would download ~33 bytes per second. I remember when upgrading to 1200bps and I could no longer read text as it scrolled too fast.

Today, with my Xfinity 1Gbit connection I average ~40 megabytes per second downloading and occasionally up to ~85 megabytes per second downloads with a well seeded Bittorrent. By comparison, I could download ~145-200 complete Apple II floppy disk images in ~500ms. I would never have believed that was even possible back in 1985. From ~33 bytes per second @ 300bps to ~85 megabytes per second today.

J Tiers
09-28-2018, 10:24 AM
When I was in high school, Jack Purcell sneakers were the rage, and probably cost as much as $10. I got $5 knock-offs. That was still a couple hours labor. But now you pay $600 for worn-out, duct-taped sneakers. Who can afford that



Them ain't sneakers.......

Remember "Red Ball Jets"? I forget the other 2 or three, never wore 'em. That would have been in the 50's, or so.

Mcgyver
09-28-2018, 10:50 AM
Less than it might seem.

When yo figure the 10x inflation factor, PLUS the fact that the chests were made in volume then (but much less so now), back when machinists and other tool-users were employed, instead of being fired... The price change of about 14x or so seems just about in line with most prices.

a quick check with an inflation calculator of the upper unit says the 2018 price should be $193....so its more than doubled compared to inflation.


now you pay $600 for worn-out, duct-taped sneakers.

if humanity is really that stupid, i have to think harder on how to sell into that market and take advantage of it. Maybe if I made fabrication then bent some of the metal, drove a forklift into it, dropped it, put in some random holes and torch cuts, chipped paint and a bunch of rust....then charge 8x as much.

lynnl
09-28-2018, 11:42 AM
Them ain't sneakers.......

Remember "Red Ball Jets"? I forget the other 2 or three, never wore 'em. That would have been in the 50's, or so.

You're probably thinking of Keds and Converse.

The age differences among the group here make for some funny reading. Those of us in the ages 70's and 80's no doubt, like me find some humor in hearing things described as ancient, when to us it was not that long ago.

But regarding the change of prices over the years, what I find amazing is that some things like a dozen eggs or a bushel of corn have hardly changed at all in the last 75 to 100 years. ...sure, a few cents maybe, but certainly not at the same pace as inflation.

Lew Hartswick
09-28-2018, 12:12 PM
Y
The age differences among the group here make for some funny reading. Those of us in the ages 70's and 80's no doubt, like me find some humor in hearing things described as ancient, when to us it was not that long ago.

But regarding the change of prices over the years, what I find amazing is that some things like a dozen eggs or a bushel of corn have hardly changed at all in the last 75 to 100 years. ...sure, a few cents maybe, but certainly not at the same pace as inflation.
:-) Yep. As one who graduated high school in 1949 , all this talk of the 50s being ancient is sort of comical. I suppose the Korean war to those folks is about like WWI was to me and my contemporaries.
...lew...

RB211
09-28-2018, 12:21 PM
:-) Yep. As one who graduated high school in 1949 , all this talk of the 50s being ancient is sort of comical. I suppose the Korean war to those folks is about like WWI was to me and my contemporaries.
...lew...
More like the civil war

Dave C
09-28-2018, 12:46 PM
:-) Yep. As one who graduated high school in 1949 , all this talk of the 50s being ancient is sort of comical. I suppose the Korean war to those folks is about like WWI was to me and my contemporaries.
...lew...
+1 class of 59

A.K. Boomer
09-28-2018, 12:59 PM
The age differences among the group here make for some funny reading. Those of us in the ages 70's and 80's no doubt, like me find some humor in hearing things described as ancient, when to us it was not that long ago.



I remember dating younger girls and having to explain to them what a rotary dial phone was - then getting that "oh yeah now I know what you mean i think iv seen them in an old movie or two" lol then all the sudden im feeling ancient hoping that i don't have to meet the girls parents someday lol

J Tiers
09-28-2018, 01:41 PM
50s are not ancient, I was there. 40s, I wasn;t, but they are about the same to me.

1900? I am safe calling that ancient, although my grandpa was born in 1875. His father and uncle served in the civil war.

lynnl
09-28-2018, 03:48 PM
More like the civil war

Well, that's another interesting point. I had tended to view the civil war as long ago in the past, UNTIL Ken Burns produced that documentary film series back in the 60's or 70's (don't recall exact time). That changed my assessment of how long it had been. It also stirred my memory of an event when I was a small kid.

I was born in 1944, and I recalled my dad once pointing out to me a very old man and telling me, "son, you're looking at one of the last remaining civil war soldiers." I couldn't remember how old I'd been at the time, probably 5 or 6. The old man was, I'm sure, well over a hundred, and was probably a young teenager at the time of the war.

My granddad died at the age of 81 or 82 in 1951, and my mother told of hearing from her grandparents that they could hear the roar of the battle of Shiloh (Tennessee) which was about 15 miles or so away from the family farm.

flylo
09-28-2018, 05:08 PM
+1 class of 59

I was born in '59 & I'm old.

flylo
09-28-2018, 05:11 PM
She's hot - does she come with the jeans?

Sorry but her & the jeans ain't worth $174 to me.

flylo
09-28-2018, 05:29 PM
I clearly remember getting our first TV. Which is to say that prior to this there was no TV in our house ever. There was only one channel to begin with but eventually there were a couple more. And yes, it went off air around midnight with the ubiquitous test pattern but in other areas there was just static. Sadly, I'm sure there are very few of us out there that can relate this experience.
Also , I remember once my mother gave my younger sister a dollar to go to the store and she spent the whole dollar instead of just ten cents or so and bring back the change. Mom hit the roof and dragged my sister back to the store & returned the excess. Man was she mad! Which shows again back in the old days, children could run freely in the neighborhood without fear. Today, not so much.

I'm 59 & when I was 12 my dad paid almost $800 for a 25" RCA, we got 2 channels CBS & NBC & once in a while ABC across the lake from Chicago. The best thing I got was a 6 trasister pocket radio, WLS & WCFL both AM from Chicago clear as a bell & WLS farm type stations before that, I remember CFL was some type of labor station but both were good rock by my time.

JoeLee
09-28-2018, 06:36 PM
I can remember listening to WCFL at night when I was a kid.

JL...

lynnl
09-28-2018, 06:53 PM
Don't know WCFL, but I listened to WLS after the local station turned down their power at night.

Anybody remember DJ Dick Beondi (not sure of the spelling)? ..maybe Biondi?? or Byondi. I remember him singing about pizza and meatballs? "...on top of Ol' pizza.., all covered with cheese, I lost my poor meat ball ...when somebody sneezed.."

Then there was a Nashville rythm & blues station, brought to you by Ernie's Record Rack. Ahh..., to be young again! ..."I found my thrill-l-l, on blueberry hill-l-l..."

J Tiers
09-28-2018, 07:09 PM
I was born in '59 & I'm old.

Dang kids.....

brian Rupnow
09-28-2018, 08:26 PM
I can remember staying up with a friend late at night in the 1950's and listening to WWVA wheeling west Virginia. You couldn't get it in the daytime, but at night it would come in crystal clear. Coca cola was 5 cents to drink in the store, or 7 cents to take out, but you got 2 cents back for the empty bottle. Small ice cream cones were a nickel. Two scoopers cost a dime. Dad worked in the local sawmill for $50 a week in the early part of the summer. Generally all of the sawmills ran out of logs by the end of August, but that was okay. September was for cleaning up what was left of the garden and digging potatoes. October was hunting season. November was time to slaughter the pig and hang the carcass in the loft of the woodshed. End of November dad was back in the logging camps, not to be seen again until the ice went out in April.---Brian

754
09-28-2018, 09:05 PM
Darryl got a question for you. .
Did you ever go up to Kelowna in the 60,s or 70,s it was a very cool place. I grew up here.
Did you listen to Cfox and Cfun ?
In 77 / 78 I spent a winter in Cwack, was racing my CB 750non Dixon Rd fun times..

Oh and I found out I am older than Flylo, I was surprised..

jdedmon91
09-28-2018, 09:14 PM
I was born in 55. Graduated HS 74. I remember the our first color TV and I was in HS. I think it was around $800 also. There was a guy who came out and installed your antenna. We was luckier we had 2 channels out of Charlotte, 2 channels out of Greenville, Spartanburg SC. Also 1 out of Asheville.

Actually got lucky and was working in a machine shop in town PT while I finished school then was hired full time after graduation. Dang that seems a lifetime ago


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

PStechPaul
09-28-2018, 10:12 PM
When I was in elementary school I built a crystal radio (actually using a 1N34 germanium diode), and after sundown I was able to listen to the Canadian station CKLW, which I think cranked up their power at that time.

I think I also made a radio with a few germanium transistors, probably CK722, CK768, and 2N107. The plans may have been in a Popular Electronics magazine, which had articles like the following (1959):

http://www.rfcafe.com/references/popular-electronics/understanding-transistor-circuits-aug-1959-popular-electronics.htm

http://www.rfcafe.com/references/popular-electronics/images/understanding-transistor-circuits-aug-1959-18.jpg http://www.rfcafe.com/references/popular-electronics/images/understanding-transistor-circuits-aug-1959-27.jpg

http://www.rfcafe.com/references/popular-electronics/images/understanding-transistor-circuits-aug-1959-29.jpg http://www.rfcafe.com/references/popular-electronics/images/aug-1959-popular-electronics-cover.jpg

flylo
09-28-2018, 11:44 PM
We lived close to Heath Co, Heald Co, Buck Chuck, Clark Equip, Whirlpool, Checker Motors across the st. from Atlas Co, Fatsco boat stoves, Heddon Lures, & many many more large & small mfg Companies. Like living in china today I guess but under much better living conditions. Many people built TVs, Ham radios, test equipment, had home foundries, etc.

J Tiers
09-28-2018, 11:52 PM
That 2N35 circuit is a hoot....

Would not work with a silicon transistor, on account of base bias and the inherent V(be) issue. Works with the 2N35 because germanium transistors had typically a high leakage current. I might have a couple of those around somewhere, and likely a 1N34 or two, possibly some CK722. No clue where, though.

Our first TV had a round tube, about 8" or so, and was, of course, all tubes. Later had a DuMont combo unit, that had tuning continuous from AM radio right thru the VHF TV band.... About a 6 turn spiral dial turning a big inductor with a sliding contact. Wish I still had that tuner, anyhow.

lakeside53
09-29-2018, 12:15 AM
My first transistors (1965 'ish) were germanium PNP OC71. They had a glass tube painted black. Scratch off the paint and they became photo sensitive... Yay... crappy light meter fix! Later the company released an OCP71... the more expensive "photo version".


Hey.... it's still in recorded history. https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Category:OCP71

http://www.wylie.org.uk/technology/semics/Mullard/Mullard.htm

We sure have com a long way from "idium pellets" ;)

Dave C
09-29-2018, 03:25 AM
I was born in '59 & I'm old.
Don't say that around my daughter, she's almost your age. I must be one of the oldest guys on this forum. 04/15/1941

A.K. Boomer
09-29-2018, 08:43 AM
Don't say that around my daughter, she's almost your age. I must be one of the oldest guys on this forum. 04/15/1941

yeah it's all perspective - it's as old as you think it is I guess cuz im one year shy of him and just won a bike race last month, not only my age group but all the guys in their 40's ---- 30's - and all but one in their 20's --- average day i feel like im in about my late 30's and that's not so bad esp. considering i get to carry with me all my wisdom iv accumulated, *(when i can remember and recall it) :p

Lew Hartswick
09-29-2018, 08:52 AM
Don't say that around my daughter, she's almost your age. I must be one of the oldest guys on this forum. 04/15/1941
HA! 29 Aug 1932 . You are just a youngster.
...lew...

fjk
09-29-2018, 03:44 PM
I was born in '59 & I'm old.

Gee, I was born in 59 too, and Iím not old :-)
Though I am in the 1% at my day job :-/

Frank

lakeside53
09-29-2018, 04:58 PM
1953... I believe I'm the oldest in a company of 550 ;)

Frank Ford
09-29-2018, 05:01 PM
I fondly remember the days when guys my age didn't spend all their time "remembering when" and talking about their heath issues. . .

darryl
09-30-2018, 12:10 AM
754, I did in fact spend time in Kelowna, mostly in Penticton though. Would have been in '68 and '69. We would park right on the beach and stay for the weekend. Sometimes we would stop in the tunnels on the canyon highway in the early am and just walk around yelling and such. I probably still have a cassette recording on one of our 'sessions'.

Yes, I listened to CKLG, CFOX, CFUN, CHWK, LG73. I don't remember all the names, but Terry David Mulligan was one of the DJs. I actually auditioned at CHWK, but they never called me back.

I remember that circuit, but it was probably reprinted in later years. I remember the OC series, the CK series of transistors. I replaced a lot of germanium outputs in car radios back then, the big round can with a central bolt for mounting it. Also replaced a lot of vibrators in tube type car radios. I don't recall just when I started buying Popular Electronics, but it was back when they published the small format. Still have all of those that I didn't lose in shipping when I went to Africa. That was '69 and '70. Back then I drove the English Ford van, the Taurus. There were pictures of sportsmen on the sides of it, along with our business phone number. It was hard for me to hide in that thing.

Anyone remember the WonderBar radio? Hit a seek button and a motor would drive the tuning dial to the next station. Or how about the 45 player for cars?

RB211
09-30-2018, 12:18 AM
1980 here...

lakeside53
09-30-2018, 12:32 AM
heck, that was yesterday!

flylo
09-30-2018, 01:28 AM
yeah it's all perspective - it's as old as you think it is I guess cuz im one year shy of him and just won a bike race last month, not only my age group but all the guys in their 40's ---- 30's - and all but one in their 20's --- average day i feel like im in about my late 30's and that's not so bad esp. considering i get to carry with me all my wisdom iv accumulated, *(when i can remember and recall it) :p

My mind is sharp as ever but my body is 15-20 years older than it really is with close to no mobility left but I try to do at least one thing a day. Getting "Free Bird" the ambulance ready. Had a 2" seam tear on the outside edge of both cab seats (after 25 years) my wife sewed up while I made a missing hood latch bumper. Added a 40 qt 12v cooler between the seats & as building a dry flush toilet with a seperate urine catch using the built in vacuum pump. Just got a catalyst heater NIB in & may make a tiny wood stove as I have some 8"x8" sqare tube. Got a walk thru screen for the side door & a roll up for both doors open in the rear that UPS broke. By late afternoon I'm done if I did anything or not. Getting rid of the big electric forklift so I can get it in the hanger. I have to decide which storage to get rid of which is better than what to add as they do in the Sprinter builds. It has a lot of alum diamond plate & I do too so we're going the industrial theme. Love my coffee so I have a 12v, 120 maker & a gas burner as I'm having my coffee which for years said was killing me ow it's keeping me going & is good for me they say. Science & the Med industry are like fasion, wait long enough & things change back to what it was. Look at the flat earth movement.

Mcostello
09-30-2018, 08:03 PM
I can remember going to an auto parts store and asking about rebuilding a 4 barrel carb. $4 a barrel + parts was the answer and I thought He was asking for My (young) life's savings.

J Tiers
09-30-2018, 08:51 PM
heck, that was yesterday!

LOL... yep.....

tomato coupe
09-30-2018, 09:15 PM
Science & the Med industry are like fasion, wait long enough & things change back to what it was. Look at the flat earth movement.

????

Is science now telling us the earth is flat? I must have missed the memo ...

J Tiers
09-30-2018, 09:39 PM
????

Is science now telling us the earth is flat? I must have missed the memo ...

I think (hope?) he means that there are now more folks who think it is, or claim to.... it's "back in fashion".

Not that "science" (whatever that is as an "entity") is telling us it is flat.

A.K. Boomer
09-30-2018, 11:01 PM
I know a girl who's a flat earther,,, I tried to reason with her and she had an "excuse" for everything,,, then i finally told her "if the earth is flat don't you think it would cool quickly internally?" and then asked her to explain molten lava shooting into the sky lol

pretty much a blank stare

but damn is she cute - it was a cute blank stare...

J Tiers
09-30-2018, 11:15 PM
Folks who believe things that are disprovable ALWAYS seem to have "reasons" that involve a hoax perpetrated on the population.

Once you start with the idea of a hoax, the more clear it is that the belief is wrong, well, that just proves the hoax is a really good one...... After all it fooled you.... but the believer, they went the extra bit and "discovered" the hoax, so they KNOW....

Someone is supposed to have said (approximately) that "it aint the things you don't know that are a problem, it's the things you know for certain, that actually ain't so that are the problem."