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View Full Version : first ever micrometer?



darryl
02-23-2019, 03:04 AM
https://youtu.be/1K_NQlmOwqM

PStechPaul
02-23-2019, 06:09 AM
Very cool. Also interesting was another video about the first industrial lathe, dating to 1751, and considered "the machine that made everything". It was a harbinger of the dawn of the industrial revolution, enabled by a revolving apparatus ;)

Lew Hartswick
02-23-2019, 08:58 AM
Interesting; Sure wish I could have heard what he was saying. Typical of almost ALL U-Tube stuff. People all seem to be in such a hurry to get done they just don't take the time to speak slowly and enunciate clearly . :-(
...lew...

elf
02-23-2019, 03:13 PM
Very cool. Also interesting was another video about the first industrial lathe, dating to 1751, and considered "the machine that made everything". It was a harbinger of the dawn of the industrial revolution, enabled by a revolving apparatus ;)

Depends on your definition of 'industrial'. Lathes were in use 1300BC. I'm sure they weren't used just to play with.

Dan_the_Chemist
02-23-2019, 03:45 PM
Interesting; Sure wish I could have heard what he was saying. Typical of almost ALL U-Tube stuff. People all seem to be in such a hurry to get done they just don't take the time to speak slowly and enunciate clearly . :-(
...lew...

Sometimes I turn on the CC closed captions. They even work if you slow the speed using the gear button in the lower right.

I find it particularly useful for the guys who make Fusion 360 videos and who use every mouse shortcut, have totally customized ribbons, and can click and speak at 200 words per minute.

MattiJ
02-23-2019, 04:58 PM
Interesting; Sure wish I could have heard what he was saying. Typical of almost ALL U-Tube stuff. People all seem to be in such a hurry to get done they just don't take the time to speak slowly and enunciate clearly . :-(
...lew...

Clear enough for me and I'm not even native english speaker. Could have been tad slower in part or two.

"doubleboost" youtube would be something different:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1F-X_DwtW_c

dalee100
02-23-2019, 05:32 PM
Hi,

Doubtful it's the "first" mic, looks too refined. But it is an early one and a definite step to what we use today. One thing for sure, it's older than mine and I've owned most of mine for decades.

PStechPaul
02-23-2019, 05:32 PM
I have significant hearing loss, especially in my left ear, but I could understand most of the first videos about the micrometer and lathe. But, yeah, doubleboost sounds like his mouth is full of swarf, and turning on the closed captions is quite amusing ;)

I find it helps to use a decent set of Bluetooth headphones. The ones I bought recently were only about $20 at MicroCenter. The prices ranged from about $10 to over $100.

Paul Alciatore
02-23-2019, 05:34 PM
It's interesting that they really don't know if Watt made it. As for it being the first, I paused the video on that highlighted book passage and read further that it was probably patterned on an instrument made by an astronomer. As if almost always the case, "new" inventions are based on a lot of prior work. I am not detracting from Watt or whoever made this micrometer, but just pointing this out.

Ringo
02-23-2019, 08:19 PM
Here is an interesting link, from Mitutoyo

https://www.mitutoyo.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/03/Brief_History_Mic.pdf

JRouche
02-23-2019, 08:47 PM
https://youtu.be/1K_NQlmOwqM

I watched the entire vid. Informative. Thanks man. JR

JRouche
02-23-2019, 08:53 PM
Interesting; Sure wish I could have heard what he was saying. Typical of almost ALL U-Tube stuff. People all seem to be in such a hurry to get done they just don't take the time to speak slowly and enunciate clearly . :-(
...lew...

Enunciate! It is just a matter of taking some time when you speak or wright {sic}. JR

Dan_the_Chemist
02-24-2019, 11:11 AM
[snip] As for it being the first, I paused the video on that highlighted book passage and read further that it was probably patterned on an instrument made by an astronomer. [snip]

The Mitutoyo cited by Ringo book cites the Astronomer Gascoigne, who was active around the 1630's. However, a lot of people miss the contributions of Tycho Brahe (Torkil Brahe Danish). In the time around 1570 Brahe made a gift of a compass to the Astronomer Paul Heinzel. The compass had one fixed arm and the swinging arm was adjusted by means of a screw and read off with the aid of an early form of a vernier indicator.

Brahe was one of the first astronomers to work down to seconds of accuracy. Some of his instruments were twice as tall as a person, and required a small crew to orient, align, and read them. The tables produced at his observatory at Uraniborg were the most accurate available for several hundred years. I visited Uraniborg on the island of Hven, but little remains of his observatory.

This wikipedia article has some drawings of some of his instruments.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tycho_Brahe

Interesting factoid - Brahe lost his nose in a fencing duel, and had a gilt nose fashioned to replace it.

oldwing
02-24-2019, 11:42 AM
While not an answer to the original post, I think many will find this book absolutely fascinating, The Perfectionists: How Precision Engineers Created the Modern World

https://www.amazon.com/Perfectionists-Precision-Engineers-Created-Modern/dp/0062652559/ref=sr_1_1?hvadid=267894096138&hvdev=t&hvlocphy=9019614&hvnetw=g&hvpos=1t1&hvqmt=e&hvrand=16859130131516581921&hvtargid=kwd-445280713089&keywords=simon+winchester+precision&qid=1551026375&s=gateway&sr=8-1&tag=googhydr-20