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BobinOK
03-08-2019, 04:30 PM
Wondering if a Bridgeport mill can be moved in a Chevy 1500 pickup?

wygant
03-08-2019, 04:59 PM
Wondering if a Bridgeport mill can be moved in a Chevy 1500 pickup?
Piece by piece, yes......weight even on the small round ram I have is 1800 total.....Pete

3 Phase Lightbulb
03-08-2019, 06:07 PM
My first bridgeport came home in the back of my Dodge Ram 2500 without any problems. Not sure about a Chev 1500 but should be ok.

Toolguy
03-08-2019, 06:38 PM
I would put it on a low trailer. Machine tools are top heavy. That's a lot of weight sitting up high in a pickup bed. If you tie it down good and take a corner a little too fast, you might crash the mill and the truck.

754
03-08-2019, 06:42 PM
I hauled my 2500 lb turret lathe 375 miles on my 76 F 150... no problem if a scale does not stop you..
A few 4000 lb machines 250 miles on my 74 Chev 3/4 ton..

bob308
03-08-2019, 06:51 PM
I moved a wells index with .48 inch table. first I took off the top ram with head. put it on a skid. then cranked the knee down put on pipe and rolled it out on a flat bed trailer. did all this by myself. the trick is keep the weight as low as you can. a k1500 sets too high to move that much weight.

MikeL46
03-08-2019, 06:57 PM
Depends on how far you are going, and the road conditions.

100 miles on smooth pavement- no problem

100 miles rough dirt road - no way

1000 miles on smooth pavement - iffy. How long does an overloaded axle last?

For across town I have grossly overloaded a 1/2 ton pu. Drove slow and very carefully.

Bolting the mill to a pallet will help with stability. Heavy tiedowns to prevent sliding as well as tilt/tip are needed.

Mike

Illinoyance
03-08-2019, 07:02 PM
I moved mine using a drop deck trailer from Sun Belt Rental. Moved it onto the trailer using skates. Jacked it up and replaced the skates with 4x4s. Put skates back under it at the destination and rolled it off. Same deal with a 4500 lb. lathe.

SteveF
03-08-2019, 07:31 PM
Use a trailer, or if it's not far make two trips. I weighed them when I had my BP apart and the 42" table was 205 lbs and the step pulley head 210 lbs. Not sure about the ram but that would be another 200 ish piece.

Steve

Rich Carlstedt
03-08-2019, 08:18 PM
In short, Yes ....if you have decent tires
Mike in post # 7 nailed it.
I have moved 4 times since I got my Bridgeport, and have moved several other Bridgeports ( 1800-2,000 ) as well.
Also moved a Tree mill (2100-2200) and a Milwright (1650 ?) in my Ford half tons ( F 100 and F 150) during that time.
I can load and unload a Bridgeport by myself without any help and only using a come allong and no crane or hoist. ( more later)
Make absolutely sure the Bridgeport is as far forward in the bed and also rotate the head so the motor is upside down and the knee lowered all the way, then a few wood blocks and raise the knee as little as possible so the blocks support the spindle motor.
In maybe 20 to 30 such moves ( upto 80 miles ) I only had one problem. I was moving a Brown and Sharp Surface grinder (1900#~)
on the back of a F 100 and had it only over the rear axle as I was moving it 15 miles. I made a sharp left turn and blew out the leaf spring on the right side.
I was able to limp along back to the shop and luckily the main leaf did not break. If I had it forward and not been driving aggressively, i would have been fine.
One more hint -go buy a good forged USA made EYE BOLT with 1/2-13 threads . BP's have a tapped hole on the top of the ram for it. You can use it and the column for tieing down ,with the eye bolt the most effective way. They are rated at about 2,000 # and while I have raised BP's with it, i don't recommend it.
Do not use the hand wheels for tie downs, if you must , used a locked bolt ( or eye bolt) in the table T slots and lock the table clamps down.
Rich

Ohio Mike
03-08-2019, 08:22 PM
The problem with standard pickups no the matter the size is there aren't good tie points for something that tall and heavy. I'd put it on a trailer.

CCWKen
03-08-2019, 08:24 PM
Put the knee down as far as it will go then run the table back as far it will go. Loosen the tilt and flip the head over then retighten. Lift by the ram. (Make sure it's tight.)

I took mine apart to move it since all I had was an engine lift to load it on a trailer. The knee alone weighs about 700 pounds.

Rich Carlstedt
03-08-2019, 08:27 PM
I do not like trailers and the only damaged BP I have seen was a trailer job
My friend would not allow me to help move his bridgeport and insisted it be loaded on a trailer and use his pickup.
Well as he was unloading, He moved the BP to the back of the trailer and was setting up to roll it down a ramp (yikes !) when
the trailer hitch ball clamp failed (!) and the tongue went up and the BP went down and flipped over on the concrete driveway.
Scratch one BP ! Cracked the headstock casting ...So be careful !
Trailer hitches are use to being pushed down--not strong with vertical lifting loads IMHO
Rich

CCWKen
03-08-2019, 08:37 PM
Your friend sure has bad luck. What are the odds of some dummy not having the right size ball for a trailer or having a junk trailer. :cool:

Rich Carlstedt
03-08-2019, 08:53 PM
Ken , He called me when the mill was on the ground and the trailer was borrowed from another guy..maybe it was the ball ?? I think you may be right.

Here is a explanation somewhat of the tool (cart ) i use in a earlier posting:

http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/threads/72475-Lifting-handling-Bridgeport-mill-types/page5?highlight=moving+bridgeport

Rich

I should add that the lifting eyethread may have been changed in size or with clones. My 1962 Ram is 1/2-13 and the later BPs in the 70.s had the same

bob308
03-08-2019, 08:59 PM
what dummy would roll that much weight to the rear of a trailer with out having a block under the back of the trailer along with not having a way to let the weight back slow or stop it ?

Fasttrack
03-08-2019, 09:07 PM
I do not like trailers and the only damaged BP I have seen was a trailer job
My friend would not allow me to help move his bridgeport and insisted it be loaded on a trailer and use his pickup.
Well as he was unloading, He moved the BP to the back of the trailer and was setting up to roll it down a ramp (yikes !) when
the trailer hitch ball clamp failed (!) and the tongue went up and the BP went down and flipped over on the concrete driveway.
Scratch one BP ! Cracked the headstock casting ...So be careful !
Trailer hitches are use to being pushed down--not strong with vertical lifting loads IMHO
Rich

That's what stabilizer jacks are for... I can't imagine trying to roll a machine off the back of a trailer and depending on the ball clamp to keep it from teeter-tottering. Seems like that's just asking for trouble. Even on trailers that don't have stabilizer jacks (e.g. u-haul), I always block under the back of the trailer and then crank the tongue jack until the trailer is loading the wood blocks. Then start letting the machine down the incline (I shouldn't have to say this, but - the machine should always be well secured before putting the trailer on any kind of incline. I usually put the machine on rollers - "Egyptian log style" or pallet jack and then use a come along or winch to let it down the incline in a slow, controlled manner).

IMO, trailer is the way to go. I don't like driving with a high center of gravity and it's tough to tie things down in most pick up beds.

larry_g
03-08-2019, 09:09 PM
Wondering if a Bridgeport mill can be moved in a Chevy 1500 pickup?

The year and weight rating of your rig will tell you a lot. A quick look says the 1500 is rated to haul anywhere from 1500-2600lbs. I regularly haul a ton of hay in my 1500 but it is a heavy one.

lg
no neat sig line

CCWKen
03-08-2019, 09:09 PM
Here's the lifting diagram out of the manual. It doesn't show lifting by the "lift eye". This is what I meant by lifting by the ram.

http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/attachment.php?attachmentid=4826&d=1552097343

Glug
03-08-2019, 09:48 PM
Here's the lifting diagram out of the manual. It doesn't show lifting by the "lift eye".

I have read that the eye is strictly for installing the ram on the base, not for lifting the machine.

reggie_obe
03-08-2019, 10:06 PM
The year and weight rating of your rig will tell you a lot. A quick look says the 1500 is rated to haul anywhere from 1500-2600lbs. I regularly haul a ton of hay in my 1500 but it is a heavy one.

lg
no neat sig line

How much you can carry in the bed is determined to a great extent by the carrying capacity of the axles, springs and tires, especially the rear axle. Being able to safely stop the load is another issue.

larry_g
03-09-2019, 12:35 AM
How much you can carry in the bed is determined to a great extent by the carrying capacity of the axles, springs and tires, especially the rear axle. Being able to safely stop the load is another issue.

I agree, however over the years the 1/2 ton pickups have had a variety of capabilities and before the OP can get an answer to his question he needs to know, and tell the membership, the ratings of his particular vehicle. With out that information his question cannot be answered. OP, do you know that you can get your ratings from a sticker on the vehicle, usually on the door jam? Also what series is your BP as they have changed in weight over the years?

lg
no neat sig line

Arcane
03-09-2019, 12:39 AM
Here's a PDF file of a BP manual. On page 1.1 it shows both methods for lifting a BP mill. FYI...my BP clone has a 3/4" eyebolt installed as shown in Method 1 in the manual.

I have also seen another BP manual where just the sling method is shown. I suspect they deleted the eyebolt on newer mills to reduce manufacturing costs.

http://www.truetex.com/bridgeport-manual.pdf

BobinOK
03-09-2019, 05:27 AM
Thanks for all the info guys. I now have a mini mill with a bunch of upgrades but well you know it's not a Bridgeport. Been watching Craigslist, bout the only source around here and started wondering if I found one about moving it. My pickup is a 2000 Chevy 4X4 work truck, regular cab long bed. I know about the sticker with the GVW but also know things can be fudged a bit.

projectnut
03-09-2019, 08:36 AM
Over the years I've moved dozens of machines. However I much prefer loading them on a drop deck trailer to attempting to lift them high enough to load them on a pickup. Sun belt, United Rental, and many local rental companies have them for around $50.00 a day. I paid $44.00 a day for the last one I rented.

Here's a link to one that could handle a Bridgeport with no problems:
https://www.sunbeltrentals.com/equipment/detail/1413/0240130/4ft-x-9ft-lift-bed-single-axle-trailer/

Here's a video of one being used to move a 5000 lb. horizontal mill. This guy said he paid $85.00 a day, but even at that price it's worth the expense.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uMg1X6t3qUY

wdtom44
03-09-2019, 11:09 AM
I would prefer a trailer, the tie downs are usually better. You want a wide sturdy and stable base or pallet to fasten the machine to too. And always put a block under the back of the trailer when loading anything heavy. I deal with antique farm tractors and I have heard of guys loading or unloading tractors and the back of the truck unloads enough to allow it to move, maybe on a hill or some other reason. If you rent a trailer you might not want to tell them anything about moving a machine, somewhere I heard U haul will not rent if they find out you are going to move anything but a car. If you use a truck, even a 2500 or 3500 it will handle the weight better if the load is as far forward as t he base/pallet of the machine will allow so some of the weight is on the front axle. Loaded forward I think most "half ton" trucks now will handle a ton if you are cool about it.