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View Full Version : This old stuff fascinates me...............OT or no ???



Ringo
03-12-2019, 09:28 PM
This video has flyballs governor, cranks, cams, and flywheels, it got engineering of its own kind, so I guess it is sorta related topic to this forum.
fascinating to me,,,,,,,

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DHM_ztAUqVc

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M57eCpaJuX4

michigan doug
03-12-2019, 09:48 PM
Of topic or not, totally fascinating.

Anybody need some 2 x 20's??

Ringo
03-12-2019, 10:06 PM
and it's green too?
burning your own sawdust is 'green' isn't it??

Danl
03-12-2019, 11:27 PM
Wow, had to watch both of them. Mesmerizing....

Dan L

PStechPaul
03-13-2019, 01:52 AM
Here is another sawmill video, in this case an Amish one, cutting a huge maple. It's interesting that they used a diesel engine, while the non-Amish guys used wood-fired steam.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xWjs3lGk8xk

This compilation is also interesting, showing various techniques, including two-man hand sawing:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YJjQIeQJiPE

Dedave
03-13-2019, 01:59 AM
Making America Great. :D Honest work.

brian Rupnow
03-13-2019, 10:14 AM
Ringo--It fascinates me also, and I am old enough to remember it. There were three separate sawmills in the village where I grew up in semi northern Ontario. One operated by steam engine, one by a water turbine, and one by a caterpillar diesel engine .---Brian

sasquatch
03-13-2019, 11:09 AM
Great videos Ringo, Good stuff! Thanks.

Ringo
03-13-2019, 02:46 PM
I remember a similar sawmill as a kid, but I remember it being diesel driven, and in that time frame probable a 6-71 Detroit.
When I was a kid the 6-71 was THE engine of industry.
BUT, here's the rub that I don't see;
if they were both similar size sawmill, and one has a 6-cylinder deisel, then how does that other steam mill keep up with it's single cylinder whereas the deisel has 6 cylinders?
Where does all the power of a steam engine come from? One cylinder does the work of six deisel cylinders???

Guido
03-13-2019, 04:12 PM
Sebastipol, Ca. Sturgeons Mill, bring 'yer hardhat and gloves. http://www.sturgeonsmill.com/

oxford
03-13-2019, 08:12 PM
What is the machine that was next in line after the mill in the first vid in the OP? I thought maybe a planer but I saw in another video that they have a different dedicated planer. It also didn’t look like it was trimming the edges for re-sawing.

lugnut
03-13-2019, 08:33 PM
I watched a steam powered sawmill that they run at the Oregon Steam up held late July and early August in Banks Oregon each year. Well worth the time. I haven't been to the Steam up for a few years, but after watching this video, it stirs me up to attend this year.

Ringo
03-13-2019, 10:51 PM
What is the machine that was next in line after the mill in the first vid in the OP? I thought maybe a planer but I saw in another video that they have a different dedicated planer. It also didn’t look like it was trimming the edges for re-sawing.

I think that was a width saw. For sawing common width.

brian Rupnow
03-14-2019, 08:35 AM
That machine immediately behind the main saw is called an "edger". It trims the two "bark edges" off the board.

754
03-14-2019, 10:11 AM
Edgier often has sliding saws you can adjust.
They also cut cants, which is like beam that is then cut into multiple boards. So say the saws are set at 2 inch, run the can't thru, and get 6 2 x 10 in one trip thru the edger. Or other sizes.

browne92
03-18-2019, 04:31 PM
One of those jobs where you get to say "oops" just one time.

sasquatch
03-18-2019, 04:38 PM
Ringo, Not sure how to explain it, but Steam is super powerfull. Someone here probably knows the specs.

brian Rupnow
03-18-2019, 05:17 PM
Ringo-- Steam has the advantage of two kinds of energy. First, there is the direct pressure in pounds per square inch acting on the piston. Secondly, there is tremendous energy release because of a change of state. The steam leaves the boiler as a true "gas", but as it reaches the cylinders it undergoes a change of state, condensing from a true "gas" to droplets of "liquid". This is in part, the reason that a single cylinder steam engine develops almost as much energy as a 6 cylinder diesel. A double acting steam engine, which was more or less the standard of industry, was under power when the piston was going from top to bottom of cylinder, but was also under power going from bottom to top of cylinder. Also, a steam engine has "potential energy". At zero rpm a steam engine still can generate incredible torque because of the pressure exerted on the face of the piston. A diesel engine has no power at zero rpm. It only develops power in the "power band" of it's rpm range.

Paul Alciatore
03-18-2019, 07:36 PM
Yes, steam locomotives went directly from the cylinders to the wheels: NO GEARS. At least most of them; I am familiar with Shays. A diesel truck has how many gears? 8, 10, 12, more? And diesel locomotives are actually diesel-electrics with electric motors on the wheels. The diesels just run generators to make the electricity for those motors.




Ringo-- Steam has the advantage of two kinds of energy. First, there is the direct pressure in pounds per square inch acting on the piston. Secondly, there is tremendous energy release because of a change of state. The steam leaves the boiler as a true "gas", but as it reaches the cylinders it undergoes a change of state, condensing from a true "gas" to droplets of "liquid". This is in part, the reason that a single cylinder steam engine develops almost as much energy as a 6 cylinder diesel. Also, a steam engine has "potential energy". At zero rpm a steam engine still can generate incredible torque because of the pressure exerted on the face of the piston. A diesel engine has no power at zero rpm. It only develops power in the "power band" of it's rpm range.