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true temper
06-15-2019, 11:45 PM
I have been wanting a faceplate for my nardini I found a drill press table at the auction for 5 bucks. What do you think [emoji848] yay or nay https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20190616/7a1f23c5bc9e186d362bb23f71a24165.jpg


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754
06-16-2019, 12:11 AM
Maybe if you keep it at 150 rpm or under.
It is highly risky to go faster.

J Tiers
06-16-2019, 01:04 AM
I like it... looks much like the faceplates on biggish old machines. Plenty of holes, might not be really stiff in lathe terms, but likely works.

RPM will not be a problem unless you are gonna cowboy it.... stuff on a faceplate seems to encourage caution, as it is rarely well balanced, even if you counterweight it.... and it is usually biggish lumpy stuff that looks bad enough at a reasonable rpm.

Use your head and you'll be fine. Unless you have really got zero "mechanical intuition".

true temper
06-16-2019, 01:20 AM
I need to check the runout, I think it will work for lite duty.
I seen it on a pile of stuff, I first thought it was a faceplate then I figured it out.
I ended up not paying attention and missed it, I offered the guy that bought it 5 bux and he took it.

mihit
06-16-2019, 03:29 AM
Yes but... why is it in a chuck?

Noitoen
06-16-2019, 05:56 AM
Yes but... why is it in a chuck?

Why not? Trying to attach that "face plate" to the lathe would be a pain and for occasional use, I think it will work well.

Ringo
06-16-2019, 08:24 AM
where is the headstock center?

true temper
06-16-2019, 12:24 PM
Would only use it to bolt work to. If wanting to turn between centers I will use chuck and dog against the jaw of chuck.

754
06-16-2019, 12:52 PM
I think it's risky lots of faceplates have rpm limits. Good ones are made of semi steel and carefully selected grades to survive tge centrifugal forces..
Drill press tables were never meant to have centrifugal force, and therefore the cheapest of cast iron can be used, and they certainly will not be Xray tested.
Your choice but if it grenades, even if it misses you, it will likely leave Marks on your lathe, that you will regret forever..

So I got to ask, is finding a round steel plate that size or getting one burned....out of your economic universe..

true temper
06-16-2019, 12:59 PM
I really need to get the right face plate it takes a d1-5 camloc. Those are not the easiest ones to find.
The DP table would only be used for lite duty low RPM work, if used at all.

old mart
06-16-2019, 01:03 PM
Since faceplates are commonly used for odd shapes of work, they usually have to be run very slowly because of the out of balance forces. Even if counterbalance weights are added, there is still a risk of something slipping if the speed is not slow. The only downside of holding the faceplate in a chuck, rather than it having its own spindle adaptor is that normally a faceplate is skimmed flat once when it is first mounted. Holding in a chuck will require checking the face for runout every time with a dti. It is not as though you can skim it every time as the thickness is finite. For occasional use it will be fine.

I have just noticed that your chuck is a set tru type, could you investigate the possibility of mounting the faceplate to the chuck backplate, maybe using an adaptor, so it can be securely fixed to a repeatable surface rather than chuck jaws?

mihit
06-16-2019, 04:11 PM
Why not? Trying to attach that "face plate" to the lathe would be a pain and for occasional use, I think it will work well.

As pointed out above, runout. repeatability, and getting a dead centre up it for accurate round work.

Buy or make a backing plate for it. It shouldn't be "a pain" After all, you do have a lathe...

J Tiers
06-16-2019, 10:33 PM
..... The only downside of holding the faceplate in a chuck, rather than it having its own spindle adaptor is that normally a faceplate is skimmed flat once when it is first mounted. Holding in a chuck will require checking the face for runout every time with a dti. It is not as though you can skim it every time as the thickness is finite. For occasional use it will be fine.

....

Yep, put a piece of half inch steel or maybe even aluminum on it, drill whatever holes you need or might need. Skim that whenever you mount it. if you ever run out of thickness, just replace it.

That will also tend to hold it together if you are worried about it.

Illinoyance
06-16-2019, 10:38 PM
Yes but... why is it in a chuck?

The table has a spigot on the bottom (now the back). It is the only practical way to mount it. There isn't enough material in the table to bore to fit a backplate.

Years ago I wanted a large faceplate to fit my P&W 14 x 30. I bought a backplate. I got a round burnout from the junk yard. I think it was 1 1/2" thick. I machined the recess for the backplate using a boring/facing head on the mill. I drilled and bored a center hole for a reference when I turned the plate over to mill the T-slots. I drilled and counterbored for the mounting bolts. I put the backplate on the mill and drilled and tapped the mounting holes. I assembled the backplate to the faceplate and mounted it to the lathe. I faced it true and cleaned up the OD. I used an angle grinder to chamfer the t-slots.