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J Tiers
06-28-2019, 09:48 PM
I'm gonna let you guess just what this is for...... But it is a tool for use in the process of painting. it would not be wrong for it to have a handle, but it is not required.

I made it out of scrap stuff, so deductions from any discoloration etc may be very wrong, the scrap was dirty and had various color crud on it.

http://i.imgur.com/Cnnw4ex.jpg (https://imgur.com/Cnnw4ex)

darryl
06-28-2019, 11:00 PM
Judging from the angle of the bolt, it would appear that when opened, it would clamp just about right on a paintbrush handle. It would be handy for a slightly extended reach, and it would let you put the paintbrush down without paint getting on everything.

MichaelP
06-28-2019, 11:27 PM
A clip to hold a hanging wire. Over engineered variety.

A.K. Boomer
06-29-2019, 12:17 AM
Ok fine two can play at this game, does it clip onto a ladder? is there a bucket or paint tray involved?

J Tiers
06-29-2019, 01:03 AM
None of the above, actually.

So far nobody close......

3512b
06-29-2019, 01:40 AM
Razor scraper Handel

awemawson
06-29-2019, 02:36 AM
No need to make an Oratorio out of it :)

epicfail48
06-29-2019, 02:49 AM
My first thought was something to keep a door open while youre painting it, clips on to the door and smacks against the fram, keeps you from locking yourself in after removing the knob

Then i remembered that not everybody is as stupid as me

lynnl
06-29-2019, 04:06 AM
Used for controlling the paint line when painting in corners or against trim, or other places that you don't want painted. The RH end clamps onto a piece of thin metal (sheet metal, saw blade, etc.) to use as an edger.

cameron
06-29-2019, 06:25 AM
It's for squeezing excess paint out of small paint brushes, made by the Over-Specialized Tool Division of J Tiers Inc.

Noitoen
06-29-2019, 08:09 AM
Clamp it to the can's rim to remove excess paint without filling the sealing rim with paint:p

Arcane
06-29-2019, 08:13 AM
I'm gonna let you guess just what this is for...... But it is a tool for use in the process of painting. it would not be wrong for it to have a handle, but it is not required.

I made it out of scrap stuff, so deductions from any discoloration etc may be very wrong, the scrap was dirty and had various color crud on it.

http://i.imgur.com/Cnnw4ex.jpg (https://imgur.com/Cnnw4ex)

My guess is it's for sealing the paint can by pressing the lid of the can down into it's seat.

A.K. Boomer
06-29-2019, 08:27 AM
He said it had nothing to do with the "bucket" so think that means paint can as that's what I was talking about when I asked the question and included paint tray...


it does look like something JT would make, the wingnut's a dead giveaway...

JoeLee
06-29-2019, 08:54 AM
OK, this has gone far enough.......what is it???

JL.............

A.K. Boomer
06-29-2019, 09:06 AM
OK, this has gone far enough.......what is it???

JL.............

I just hope it's not one of those "your kidding me" type JT tools --- I mean we got people cooking their brains out and for what right? we'll see I guess...

Lee Cordochorea
06-29-2019, 11:17 AM
You guys are all over the map! It is quite obviously used for holding the novel open to the page being read. Painting is a hideously boring job and J enjoys re-reading the classics during such task. Obviously.

lakeside53
06-29-2019, 11:29 AM
Jerry doesn't have a clue what he made it for. He's desperately soliciting ideas to justify the 5 minutes he might have wasted. :)

I have something similar to hold edging metal.

Dan Dubeau
06-29-2019, 11:32 AM
It's a money clip to hold the cash for the person you're paying to do your painting. I hate painting so that's what i'd use it for. :)

alanganes
06-29-2019, 11:40 AM
I think it may be used to remove Victorian picture nails from the wall without damaging the plaster before painting the wall.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

A.K. Boomer
06-29-2019, 11:40 AM
Jerry doesn't have a clue what he made it for. He's desperately soliciting ideas to justify the 5 minutes he might have wasted. :)

I have something similar to hold edging metal.

5 minutes? I think your being very generous lol

if it is indeed handy I wish he'd spill it cuz im actually painting right now but don't really see how it could help with anything im doing, but who know's ? JT i guess...

A.K. Boomer
06-29-2019, 11:40 AM
I think it may be used to remove Victorian picture nails from the wall without damaging the plaster before painting the wall.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Your going way back lol bravo...

Corbettprime
06-29-2019, 11:43 AM
I think he was goofing off in the shop, ended up with this, and now wants to know what he has.

lynnl
06-29-2019, 11:48 AM
It could be used for damn near any purpose. The wing nut/bolt, along with the curvature of the one piece certainly suggest a clamping function. But maybe he's using it like a hammer to pound the paint can lid closed, ...or like a paper weight to hold a drop cloth in place. Maybe a prop to hold his stirrer stick to control paint drips. Or maybe it's to fish out a cold beer from an ice cooler with one hand while he paints with the other. Or maybe .... Or perhaps .... etc..

Mcgyver
06-29-2019, 11:50 AM
It's a money clip to hold the cash for the person you're paying to do your painting. :)

now thats a useful painting tool!

754
06-29-2019, 02:02 PM
He found it at the flea market, wants to figure out whether to keep it or not..

Glug
06-29-2019, 02:26 PM
Roach clip.

J Tiers
06-29-2019, 07:14 PM
Well.....

I found that I often have a need to do just a little painting or varnishing, etc. usually it is not something where I ned a super finish, but I just want to cover a part or a portion of something. if I get out a brush, then I need to clean it afterward, which takes time. if I use one of the "disposable" brushes, they are not very good at a nice finish, and they are not really saving much material, there is a plastic handle, and a foam "bristle" part.... and the things are not recyclable any way, once they have paint on them.

So, I came up with the clip. What I do is to tear off part of a blue paper shop towel, and fold it over to be about as wide as the clip, then double it over, and hold it in the clip. Now I can use it like a brush, I do not get paint etc on me, it acts like a brush, it's no worse than the "disposable" brushes, and uses a LOT less material.

Like this. I have not experimented with using the "open end" of the rolled up towel as the end of the "brush" yet. It seems to be very effective, and the blue towels do not leave lint:

http://i.imgur.com/MVbOrLb.jpg (https://imgur.com/MVbOrLb)

http://i.imgur.com/uR2WajZ.jpg (https://imgur.com/uR2WajZ)

A.K. Boomer
06-29-2019, 07:40 PM
I like being thrifty and also not using more resources than what it should really take to do something,,,

the idea is very sound, one suggestion - go with terry cloth towels as they are extra hungry for paint and will also disperse it better cuz their weave is little loops hanging father out... and your right - stay away from using the ripped up ends as that will leave a mess you cannot fix after the paint dries and incidentally the time you will see it when the paint shrinks...

CalM
06-29-2019, 09:03 PM
I dislike these guessing games, some like them. I just wait a day or two and wait for the revelation.

Myself, I use the stretch rubber examination gloves and hold the paint dipped rag with my glove covered fingers.
simple is good.

Paul Alciatore
06-29-2019, 09:21 PM
I use the disposable, foam brushes. I often use one for several coats on the same part(s). I put the wet brush in a plastic grocery bag and tie up the open end around the brush's handle. It will stay wet that way for days. I can paint a whole project with one disposable brush if it is all the same color.

As for it not being recyclable, everything is recycled. EVERYTHING! You can not ever throw anything away that is not ultimately recycled. It is just flat impossible. The time frame may vary, but it WILL get recycled. I am a patient person so I don't care if something is recycled by a company in a matter of days or if it takes millions or even billions of years and has to go through a new star to become fresh, raw materials. What I do object to is "recycling" methods that rob our environment of even more resources than the recycled item possesses. That, in my humble opinion, is NOT being "green".

And a good way to know if something takes more resources is the cost in dollars or euros or yen or whatever the local currency is. $$$ = resources. Less $$$ = greener. Fact of life. Much of what passes as being good for the environment is, in fact, the exact opposite.

But I digress from the topic. I also use those long shaft cotton swabs as a small paint brush for small items. I don't bother keeping then for a second use.

J Tiers
06-29-2019, 11:29 PM
.....

the idea is very sound, one suggestion - go with terry cloth towels as they are extra hungry for paint and will also disperse it better cuz their weave is little loops hanging father out... and your right - stay away from using the ripped up ends as that will leave a mess you cannot fix after the paint dries and incidentally the time you will see it when the paint shrinks...

The shop towel deal does a "good enough" job for nearly zero outlay. I just had a few days when is seemed that I needed to do a little "nuisance" paint job about every hour or so. They could not be grouped together due to s sequential assembly issue, and the fact that it was pretty much a case of "make the next piece to fit the assembly done so far". Spray paint did not apply, since some of the job was staining wood with a gel stain.

I decided to make the clip after the 3rd or 4th time. Worked out very well for the next dozen or so little jobs, applying pre-stain, doing the staining, varnishing, and so forth. Sometimes it got re-used, other times it was just long enough between using the same material (stain, varnish, etc) that partial hardening had occurred, and the "brush" was too stiff.

saved me a lot of trouble, and a fair amount of paint thinner. I clean brushes, but I use the same thinner for a while. But when doing a lot in a row, the prior load of paint has not settled out before I need to clean again. So I would need more thinner. Not with this.

For an 'appearance" job, I'd use a good brush, and clean it.

BTW, about those disposable brushes.... they usually wear out fairly rapidly when I use them.... I do not like the way they work, the way they wear out fast, or the amount of resources they take. When six or more "brushes" come out of one sheet of shop towel, the resources used are far below the "disposable brush"

As for the "mystery", I figures someone else had done the same thing, and so somebody would "get it" very quickly.... especially after the comment about a handle. Looks like maybe it's only obvious if you already know the answer.

A.K. Boomer
06-30-2019, 12:45 AM
FWIW along time ago a guy at ACE hardware gave me a tip about painting,,, you know how it goes - your always going back and forth and finding flaws to recover so a paint job can actually take weeks before you "know" your really done,

so instead of washing brushes and rollers and then seeing something in certain light a couple days later and saying "ahh fuque" and getting it all out again ---------------- just wrap up your brush and roller in plastic shopping bags, double wrap and rubber band and store in a cool place they will actually keep for many months --- the trouble with that is - is out of sight out of mind and you can forget all about them till the next job - and if it's years later you will have to buy new supplies...

right now I have a back deck job that's going to take weeks to get done, i did paint this morning but no clean up, just wrap in plastic and put in the pantry...

lynnl
06-30-2019, 07:06 AM
....

I clean brushes, but I use the same thinner for a while. But when doing a lot in a row, the prior load of paint has not settled out before I need to clean again. So I would need more thinner. Not with this.

For an 'appearance" job, I'd use a good brush, and clean it.
.....


I too pretty regularly will use some sort of unorthodox, make-do paint applicator. But mostly I'll just grab one of those 1" disposable (bristle) chip brushes. ...except I don't throw them away; I clean those too, time permitting. (And my time always permits these days.)

I use the paint thinner for brush cleaning indefinitely. Always have a large "settling out" jar working. It may sit there unused for a year or so. If need be, e.g. several brushes in short order, I will use some fresh stuff to then be added to the "settling" jar. Eventually the sediment builds up so much I'll transfer to a new jar and start over.

As for the mystery threads, I always enjoy them.

Abner
06-30-2019, 07:26 AM
Leave it to a machinist to make it more complicated than it needs to be. I use a spring type clothes pin and small pieces of open cell foam that I get with various purchases. You are dead center on the time savings vs clean up.

Mcgyver
06-30-2019, 08:59 AM
-------------- just wrap up your brush and roller in plastic shopping bags, double wrap and rubber band and store in a cool place they will actually keep for many months --- the trouble with that is - is out of sight out of mind and you can forget all about them till the next job - and if it's years later you will have to buy new supplies...
.

Yeah, I've probably a few forgotten about right now. Slight improvement to the process, use wax paper folded over and over around the brush, its reusable and a lot easier to unfold to remove the brush, vs the bag that has no form and will stick to the brush. I use the freezer vs just a cool place, feeze them and they last a long time.

J Tiers
06-30-2019, 09:23 AM
Bagging the brush can work.

I often find myself using, as happened this last time, several paint type materials. This time it was 4 different ones, and keeping 4 brushes in bags gets to be just too much.

When some of the materials are fast drying stuff like shellac, some prestains, or "Kilz", the bags do not work well. the brush dries out even in a bag. I hate using them even when I can clean the brush once and done. This gizmo will be used for many (not all) of those tasks as well.

Having used clothspins, like this better.

Dan Dubeau
06-30-2019, 10:04 AM
I use the freezer for brushes and rollers too. Probably have a few I've forgot about in there right now. Next to the wife's bananas she saves but never makes banana bread out of lol :)

Mcgyver
06-30-2019, 11:12 AM
Next to the wife's bananas she saves but never makes banana bread out of lol :)

I think of freezers as the frozen grave yard of good intentions.

A.K. Boomer
06-30-2019, 11:21 AM
I know exactly what he's talking about though, I have an X-GF and every time iv gone to get an ice cube or two out of her freezer here's this bunch of black bannana's tucked away in the corner, half covered in frost, I swear they have been in there for over a decade and know for sure at least 5 years...

lynnl
06-30-2019, 02:28 PM
Yeah, I've probably a few forgotten about right now. Slight improvement to the process, use wax paper folded over and over around the brush, its reusable and a lot easier to unfold to remove the brush, vs the bag that has no form and will stick to the brush. I use the freezer vs just a cool place, feeze them and they last a long time.

I've occasionally used wax paper, but more often I'll use the clingy type food wrap, e.g. Saran Wrap. With it you can squeeze it tightly around the brush to keep it a bit more air tight. With care you can reuse a couple of times, tho not as easily as wax paper.

Baz
06-30-2019, 02:42 PM
Is this blue cloth not paper you are using? I've not seen that in the uk for a couple of decades. We used to get the box of blue rags which was the washroom roller towels cut up but when the washroom went to paper and blowers the supply chain broke. We now have rolls of blue paper towel. I suppose they keep colouring it blue for historical reasons and to stop people using it as loo roll.

edit. Google seemed to show boxes of ex surgical towel rags but discontinued. Would be squeamish about using that as a source but it seems someone is providing ex tee-shirt rags.

J Tiers
06-30-2019, 11:26 PM
It's a blue paper towel, but it is treated so the paper is tougher, and does not shed fibers, they are bonded together somewhat. Common stuff at the auto parts stores, works well for a host of uses beside just as a wiper material, although it works for that also.

For general shop rag use, not cleaning gobs of grease, etc, I got a big bag of "red rags" a while back. They are cloth, around 300mm x 250mm, hemmed on the edges, made to be "shop rags". I wash them when I have a bunch dirty. If they are really bad, I soak them in a bucket of detergent solution first.

jdedmon91
07-01-2019, 05:47 PM
It's a blue paper towel, but it is treated so the paper is tougher, and does not shed fibers, they are bonded together somewhat. Common stuff at the auto parts stores, works well for a host of uses beside just as a wiper material, although it works for that also.

For general shop rag use, not cleaning gobs of grease, etc, I got a big bag of "red rags" a while back. They are cloth, around 300mm x 250mm, hemmed on the edges, made to be "shop rags". I wash them when I have a bunch dirty. If they are really bad, I soak them in a bucket of detergent solution first.

I reuse scraps from the home. Worn washcloths towels. Old T-shirts that is too stained to wear ect


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

martik
07-01-2019, 09:38 PM
Roller cleaner attachment for drill - press fir into roller, place in bucket soak and spin 5-10 times

"Indexable" paint holder, inserts are cut from a garage door sweep - also good for wood glue, contact cement, acid brush etc




https://i.imgur.com/YwcQtGa.jpg

aribert
07-30-2019, 02:06 PM
Similar to Boomer, for **water based** paints, I also double bag (each bag twisted, snugged around the brush bristles) and then store in a refrigerator. I have kept some brushes in use in the fridge for months while renovating a house. Do NOT do this with an oil based paint, solvents will migrate out and into any food in the fridge - personal experience. I've got two brushes and a roller in the fridge at the moment.




FWIW along time ago a guy at ACE hardware gave me a tip about painting,,, you know how it goes - your always going back and forth and finding flaws to recover so a paint job can actually take weeks before you "know" your really done,

so instead of washing brushes and rollers and then seeing something in certain light a couple days later and saying "ahh fuque" and getting it all out again ---------------- just wrap up your brush and roller in plastic shopping bags, double wrap and rubber band and store in a cool place they will actually keep for many months --- ...

aribert
07-30-2019, 02:10 PM
I use the freezer for brushes and rollers too. Probably have a few I've forgot about in there right now. Next to the wife's bananas she saves but never makes banana bread out of lol :)

My only experience w/ storing a latex paint soaked brush in a freezer was a freeze dried effect after a few weeks - hence I use the fridge instead.