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View Full Version : Any metal brake suggestions?



Forrest Summers
11-06-2004, 04:36 PM
Hello again,

I am in the process of rebuying all my equipment, and need some suggestions. I need a metal brake for use in a home car fabrication shop. Any brands I should avoid?

Thanks
-forrest

JRouche
11-06-2004, 05:14 PM
Hello, I am not sure if you want a powered or manual brake. I can recommend what I use. I have a tennsmith hbu 4812 box and pan brake. It is the type with removable fingers. It is very stout. It is rated at 12ga but I have only used 16ga in 48" widths. You can find them used, that is how I bought mine. JRouche

CCWKen
11-06-2004, 10:06 PM
Ditto JR.
I think it depends on whether your budget is for a Cadillac or Chevette. I'd stay away from the old Pexto's unless you can examine it. In fact, I'd watch any of the old iron.

WJHartson
11-07-2004, 12:30 AM
If your budget will handle it I would look at a Roper Whitney Magnabend brake. It is an electromagnetic brake and will do anything that a pan and box brake will and more. The one I have is 48" wide and rated for 16 gage mild steel. They cost about $2500 today. You don't see many used for sale. They are small and work well.

What size brake are you looking for? If you want small brakes there are some Di-acro unit on ebay all the time. I have a 6" and 12" shear and a 6" brake. They ae very nice for really small stuff.

I have stayed away from all of the import sheet metal equipment. Didn't like what I saw of the quality.

Joe

Forrest Summers
11-07-2004, 10:40 AM
Guys,

Thanks for the info. I am looking for a manual brake.........as for space, I want to buy something with enough space to grow. I usually outgrow my equipment, and have to rebuy.

Thanks again, I am checking into each of the suggestions.

Forrest

Ries
11-07-2004, 07:03 PM
Chicago, also known as D&K, or Dries and Krumpf, is the best american made manual brake. They made them starting at 3 feet and going up to some 12 footers, and up to 12 ga in capacity. I have a nice Chicago 12ga 4ft box and pan, and I know I will never need another brake in that size- this one will last forever.
Other good american made brakes to look at are Roper Whitney, and older W.A. Whitney- I dont think W.A. still sells brakes new, but there are lots of used ones out there.
Next step down in quality, but still american made, would be tennsmith and national.
None are cheap new, but there are lots of used ones out there- not much to wear out, so they last a long time.
The Magnabends are actually an import from Australia. Pretty cool, but only up to 16ga.


http://www.vansantent.com/sheet_metal_machines/sheet_metal_machines.htm
www.tennsmith.com (http://www.tennsmith.com)
http://www.machinetooldistributor.com/hand-brakes.htm
http://www.roperwhitney.com/

bgwrkr
11-17-2004, 11:18 AM
Great of you to add links, thank you.
It is said in this thread that used brakes are readily available, but I have yet to find where. Any suggestions? I am ready to act on my interest in metal-work by purchasing a used (if i can find one) manual 48" brake.


<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by Ries:
Chicago, also known as D&K, or Dries and Krumpf, is the best american made manual brake. They made them starting at 3 feet and going up to some 12 footers, and up to 12 ga in capacity. I have a nice Chicago 12ga 4ft box and pan, and I know I will never need another brake in that size- this one will last forever.
Other good american made brakes to look at are Roper Whitney, and older W.A. Whitney- I dont think W.A. still sells brakes new, but there are lots of used ones out there.
Next step down in quality, but still american made, would be tennsmith and national.
None are cheap new, but there are lots of used ones out there- not much to wear out, so they last a long time.
The Magnabends are actually an import from Australia. Pretty cool, but only up to 16ga.


http://www.vansantent.com/sheet_metal_machines/sheet_metal_machines.htm
www.tennsmith.com (http://www.tennsmith.com)
http://www.machinetooldistributor.com/hand-brakes.htm
http://www.roperwhitney.com/</font>

Ries
11-17-2004, 05:10 PM
Smaller used brakes are best found locally, checking your area big city classifieds online, buying your area "little nickel" type classified ad paper, checking local scrapyards, used tool dealers, and even calling sheetmetal shops and asking them if they know of any. Or you could try to put a wanted ad in the paper, and see what turns up. Watch for auctions.
That said, 48" x 16ga brakes are cheap enough $500 to $1000 or so new- that most used machine tool dealers dont mess with em. By the time you pick up, clean up, and warehouse a tool, if you are in the business, its gonna cost you a few hundred bucks- so most dealers dont mess with small stuff.
If you want a bigger brake- say a 12ga finger brake, or an 8 footer, then it may be worth checking with machinery dealers, and paying freight. Since a new Chicago or Tennsmith 4' x 12 ga finger brake is over 5 grand, it can be worth paying a few hundred bucks freight, and buying one used from a more distant dealer.

Check online at :
www.machinetools.com (http://www.machinetools.com)
www.locatoronline.com (http://www.locatoronline.com)
www.surplusrecord.com (http://www.surplusrecord.com)

all of these have ads from around the country for all kinds of tools and machines. Not the cheapest, but good for finding that oddball item- like say a powered 10 foot box and pan brake that will bend 3/8" plate.

Forrest Summers
11-17-2004, 09:23 PM
Wow, thanks guys, this is the exact information I was looking for. I appreciate the time you spent.

Thanks again,
Forrest