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View Full Version : 12x36, Absolute Minimum Tooling for First Lathe.



weldnfab
12-15-2004, 08:26 PM
When I get my new 12x36 in the next few weeks, ((I've got about 1100.00 put together over the last couple weeks so far,)), what would be the absolute minimun tooling I should put together so I can just start doing the basic turning, facing,a little boring for starters and just practicing getting used to how a lathe works. Ive read Lindsey's, How to run a lathe,by south bend from cover to cover for the last month, in bed,on the comode, in my truck between jobs, on the ferry,eveywhere I had a little time on my hands. I think my wife finally knows a new member of the family is on the way . What tooling should I also pick up from Grizzly when I go to Bellingham and get our new baby. Thanks Everyone for bearing with us new parents,it must get old answering the same old questions.. Thanks Though.. WeldnFab........

BillH
12-15-2004, 09:26 PM
Reading the how to run a lathe book, you should know what you need to run it. Get some blank HSS bits, and a grinder to grind them.

Doc Nickel
12-15-2004, 10:05 PM
Assuming you are sarting from no tooling a'tall, and also mentioning items that may be included with the lathe:

Tailstock live center.
Tailstock drill chuck, 0-1/2" capacity at least.
Four or five square HSS tool bits- for a 12", go with 1/2" square.
Bench-type grinder to grind the above tools.
Dial indicator and base (magnetic base is good, but you can get away with a chunk of bar stuck in the toolpost.)

That'll get'cha started. The eventual list is endless, but with the above, you can do most basic work.

Doc.

C - ROSS
12-15-2004, 10:11 PM
Get a lot of sleep now. When the new baby arrives you will be spending long late hours in the shop. Also lots of square and round hard things to make smaller.
Plus safety glasses.

Ross

torker
12-15-2004, 10:27 PM
Sheesh...I didn't know there was a minimum for tooling! http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//biggrin.gif

spkrman15
12-15-2004, 10:44 PM
Hey Weldnfab,

Welcome to the support group...I mean club. I will say this. Some of the following items really helped me when i started

Shims for the tool bits. You have to have them on the lathe center.

Indexable carbides. I know not cheap, but when you are leaning what the lathe can do, it is nice to be able to take one variable out of the equation

Live Center

Dial guage with magnetic stand

SAFETY GLASSES. Always wear them. Remember that is a one or more horse power motor for cutting metal. PLZ becarefull

Other than that..patience..Enjoy.

Rob http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//smile.gif
Merry Christmas

weldnfab
12-15-2004, 10:55 PM
Thanks for the input Everyone, I'm makin a list and cking it twice, HeHe...!!! Harbor Freight, Grizzly, Enco here I come Ready of not....

torker
12-15-2004, 11:01 PM
weldnfab...nice thing about this er....sport...you never have to sit on a big ol' fat wallet!

BillH
12-15-2004, 11:05 PM
Im constantly finding tooling that I need but dont have.
Latest item for me is a 60 deg center finder guage, for threading on the lathe. I also find that a dial indicator with magnetic base and a carriage stop is essential items to have, atleast with making the axles for my steam locomotive, boring to a depth accurate to .001, etc.
You'll never stop buying tools, so my best advice is to just buy as you go.

weldnfab
12-15-2004, 11:12 PM
You definatly got that right Torker!

Michael Moore
12-15-2004, 11:27 PM
If the lathe comes with a rocker tool post with forged tool holders budget some money for a quick-change toolpost. Even the cheapest one is likely to make your lathe experience about 500% more enjoyable.

Putting one on my old 10x24 was the single best investment in tooling that I made.

cheers,
Michael

toolmakerjim
12-15-2004, 11:41 PM
minimum:
aloris type wedge toolholder bxa for your lathe.
10 toolholders.
boring bars hss and carbide insert type
1/2" jacobs chuck
3/4" jacobs chuck
cnc type live center small point for facing clearance.
10" amd 16" long angle lathe file and blackboard chalk.
.001" mag base travel indicator
.0001" test indicator
thread triangles
screw pitch gauges
acme thread gauge
2 mighty mag's with indicators
a prescription for valium
hope this helps check e-bay for the best bang for your buck...jim

Dave Opincarne
12-15-2004, 11:47 PM
Jim I think you forgot the smilies to indicate you were joking in listing your minimum tooling requierments.

Earlier lists are more reasonable to get started with the lathe.

I don't think anyone's mentioned center drills to drill holes to stick the centers into.

toolmakerjim
12-15-2004, 11:54 PM
well you could get started with a block of steel and use one tool. change it for another tool etc. then you get discouraged and wonder "why am i doing this?"
pretty much every thing on my list can be bought cheap at flea markets and e-bay. except the aloris type tool holder. all the other q/c toolholders can be bought for $20. or so each if you call them and buy a few you can get a break.
i stand by my post with no smilies...jim

tattoomike68
12-16-2004, 12:03 AM
you need a fish and a steel rule.(fish= threading tool gauge)

and the machinery's handbook (any year) http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//smile.gif

Ian B
12-16-2004, 12:36 AM
WeldnFab,

I'll assume that the lathe comes with a 3 & 4 jaw chuck, maybe a faceplate and live & dead centres. Obviously, it depends what sort of work you'll be doing - general machining, where diameters don't have to be better than a thou or two, or high precision stuff. As you're just starting, I'd guess it's the former.

My list, fwiw (most of which has been listed already by others):

1. Essential
1/2" drill chuck on a taper that fits your tailstock.
3 or 4 solid HSS unground toolbits - 3/8" to 1/2" square
2 boring tools - a solid HSS one for small stuff, and a larger one (maybe with a replacable toolbit)
A set of slide calipers - digital ones are cheap now, I started with a vernier and still use it
2 centre drills - 3/16" and 3/8" diameter
A set of HSS drills, 1/16" to 1/2". For holes larger than this, you can bore them out
A hacksaw for parting off (but not while the lathe is running!)
Bits of hacksaw blade with the teeth ground off to shim your tools to centre height
A 6" double ended bench grinder
A small fine stone for touching up tools
Taps & dies as you need them - but stay away from carbon steel - buy HSS
Cutting fluid of your choice, apply it with a brush or squirt bottle
Old fine file to knock sharp corners & burrs off your work
Safety glasses


2. Nice to have
Live centre
0-1" (and maybe a 1"-2") micrometer
Dial gauge & some way of holding it
A parting off tool
A larger drill on a taper shank - makes enlarging holes quicker
Whichever trick toolpost takes your fancy

After that, the world's your oyster...

Personally, I'd be looking at Ebay & flea markets for all of the above; you can find quality new or used tooling at Chinese prices. On toolbits, I've bought various ones with either HSS or carbide lumps brazed on the end over the years, and (apart from on my shaper), I never use them. Stick with plain square ground HSS - you can grind both ends, and it lasts forever. Just remove the sharp corners with a stone.

Good luck with your new obsession (oops - I mean hobby),

Ian

kevinro
12-16-2004, 02:53 AM
I would assume you are getting the G4003? It comes with a quick change tool post and one holder. I have the same holder on my lathe. Its pretty reasonable for what it is.

I think they should be giving you 4 insert tool holders and bits. It comes with a 1/2" chuck and a live center. Its a pretty reasonable starting spot for the tooling. You should be able to make chips the first day.

Your first trick when you get the machine is to have a large collection of rags and kerosene. Seems to do the job cleaning the rust prevention grease that it will be coated with.

You will also want to make sure the machine is mounted as level as possible. If the machine isn't level in all directions, you will find that the bed may twist slightly, meaning your tailstock won't align on the center of the spindle.

As for a shopping list, I would make sure you have a 3 or 4 foot section of 1" aluminium 6061 round stock. This is going to be the best material to play with at first.

I would get an extra G5699 tool holder for $20 so you can experience the beauty of the quick change post.

You also might look into a G5705 knurling tool for $33. Nothing like doing a nice knurl on your first weekend.

They have a dial indicator for cheap. Its $19.95 with a magnetic base. G9849. As far as indicators go, its OK. Its about as accurate as the machine you are buying. You will find this sort of tool very useful for lining things up. Calipers are also important. If you don't have a pair, check out H3022 instead which has a the above indicator with a 6" dial caliper. They usually have them sitting out on the end of one of the display cases in the store.

Center Drills are critical if you want to accurately get a drill to go into your work. I would get H4459 (#4) for $1 and HH4461 (#6) for $3 for a good start.

The last tool on my list is the parting tool G5704. You will need to get a blade for it as well. It isn't obvious which blade to buy, and I don't remember off the top of my head. You should ask them for help on this. I seem to recall having to get the parting tool and a few different blade sizes to find the matching size.

I wouldn't bother jumping into the boring bars until you determine what you need.

I would swing by Costco and pickup the 115 piece drill bit set they have at the moment. They are TiN coated drills with all of the sizes, including the numbered and lettered sizes. Keep this for exclusive use with your lathe. Life is always much easier when you have a nice full set of bits handy.

Welcome to the Home Shop(ping) Machinist website. Thats what we do....

weldnfab
12-16-2004, 06:13 AM
Wow, thanks for the list's you guys,I'm gona start pickin things up for something to do until the lathe arrives. This is suuurrree fun. They're really right when they say a man never grows out of his toys, they only get more spendy. My wife and I have to eat on tv trays in the tv room cause the dining room table is so covered in Catalog's,computer printouts,and misc coffee mugs,old drink glasses, and such. This surfing business is hard work you know. HeHe.. Thanks!!

weldnfab
12-16-2004, 06:15 AM
Wow, thanks for the list's you guys,I'm gona start pickin things up for something to do until the lathe arrives. This is suuurrree fun. They're really right when they say a man never grows out of his toys, they only get more spendy. My wife and I have to eat on tv trays in the tv room cause the dining room table is so covered in Catalog's,computer printouts,and misc coffee mugs,old drink glasses, and such. This surfing business is hard work you know. HeHe.. Thanks!!

torker
12-16-2004, 07:17 AM
weldnfab...the guys have mentioned Ebay. I used to be pretty sceptical about this, but have changed my mind. In the last two days I've bought the following,
B&S 1" mic-- $8.50
New Central tool (Chinese?) 1" mic---$4.00
Starrett 1"mic---$8.25
Starrett 2"mic---(very nice)$23
Starrett telescoping guauge set $8.25
I only wish I'd have clued into this earlier.
Russ

dvk
12-16-2004, 03:44 PM
I have the 7x10 mini lathe, so I started with some inexpensive basic tools, mostly harbor frieght and enco,
1.I bought some bargain brand carbide toolbits set you get 5 in a set for all the lathe cuttings.
2. set of center drills extremely affordable.
3. A tailstock drill chuck MT2 $9.99 so as to do all the drillinng needed. (before you can even turn any long pieces you need to drill a center hole so center drills and drill chuck are essential, with the lathe bits.
3. Definately need a $7.99 dial calipers, and a $19.99 mag base incl. dial indicator for making lathe work an enjoyment of precision and not just making chips.

4. A set of 9 boring bars for around $9.99 to later make a holder and then start doing more precision work.

5. My steady rest was around $20.00 or so I think, but that can come later on when you need to machine long pieces.

6. Safety glasses as already mentioned.

All in all to keep it to the most basic, I would say from my experiance as a newbie,

1. tooling bits including cutoff blade.
2 tailstock drill chuck
3. center drills
4. calipers or mic.
5. dial indicator with some kind of magnetic base.

Allan Waterfall
12-16-2004, 05:09 PM
As many bar ends of different materials and sizes to practice on as you can scrounge.

Very frustrating to have the tools and nothing to use them on.

Allan

Buckshot
12-17-2004, 08:23 AM
.........What you NEED for basics? A pretty simple short list to simply turn something and also bore a hole in it.

I paid a friend $1500 for a really nice late model (1981) 11x36 Logan and then over a couple (really! Only about 2) I spent about $2500 buying other stuff and the lathe came with a 6 and 2 jaw Adjust-tru Bucks, 3 jaw Rohm and a 5C collet closer. No to mention the misc stuff my friend tossed in.

Lots of the stuff came from E-Bone like a dual toolpost cross slide, lots of extra toolholders, 5C collet back chuck, a 4 jaw Bison, milling attachment, and yadda, yadda, yadda.

It can get to be a sickness and should be watched closely. The monthly sale catalogs you'll end up getting can be like drugs as you pant breathlessly flipping through the pages wondering how you will get by with NOT owning one of these and one of those, and you're SURE you'll eventually need the other.

Since I had a 01 FFL for 22 years, my ears are acutely attuned to the sound of the UPS truck and I can usually meet him before he makes it to the house, so as to not disturb the wife. The fact that I NEED this stuff to be fulfilled in life is lost on the war department.

Best,
Rick

weldnfab
12-18-2004, 10:56 AM
Thanks for the post Buckshot,It appears that I need to learn how to use Ebay for my newfound addiction, I mean new found hobby..
WeldnFab....

Forrest Addy
12-18-2004, 12:25 PM
Nobody mentions spindle tooling. I'd add a 4 Jaw chuck to the list. Three jaw and collet set could come a year later.

My suggested minimum lathe equipment set would be tool post and rocker with one tool holder and maybe a parting tool with blade, a box of HSS tool steel and a bench grinder. That's it; everthing else can be made. The lathe comes with a dead center that works perfectly well when properly adjusted and lubricated. I'd also add a dial indicator although an indicator can be improvised with a long small diameter rod and a spring mount.

Your first project will be to make a center drill holder having a Morse taper on one end and a set-screwed center drill holder on the other. Next a boring bar holder and a coupleof boring bars, some Morse tapered sleeves, a steady rest, and so-on. The ingenious can do a lot with a simple seeming basic engine lathe with the minimum equipment. Clever is often a better resource than money.

One of the virtues of a lathe is if you have the time you need very little tooling to get started.

Sailor
12-18-2004, 12:45 PM
<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by Forrest Addy:
Nobody mentions spindle tooling. I'd add a 4 Jaw chuck to the list. Three jaw and collet set could come a year later.

My suggested minimum lathe equipment set would be tool post and rocker with one tool holder and maybe a parting tool with blade, a box of HSS tool steel and a bench grinder. That's it; everthing else can be made. The lathe comes with a dead center that works perfectly well when properly adjusted and lubricated. I'd also add a dial indicator although an indicator can be improvised with a long small diameter rod and a spring mount.

Your first project will be to make a center drill holder having a Morse taper on one end and a set-screwed center drill holder on the other. Next a boring bar holder and a coupleof boring bars, some Morse tapered sleeves, a steady rest, and so-on. The ingenious can do a lot with a simple seeming basic engine lathe with the minimum equipment. Clever is often a better resource than money.

One of the virtues of a lathe is if you have the time you need very little tooling to get started.</font>

Man, you are so right - have fun and mary Christmas,Sailor

weldnfab
12-18-2004, 10:56 PM
Right on Forrest Andy, thanks for that info, I was a good husband and spent the whole day shopping with my wife, so tomorrow I'm going over to a guys place out in the sticks, who has a new 12x36 grizzly and were gona get to have a looksee. I will actually get to groap a new grizzly and see how it feels. OhBoy,OhBoy,OhBoy........

MERRY CHRISTMAS!!! to all you guys and thanks again for all the information you have given me, I can feel the air replacing the green in my wallet already.! WeldnFab

Elninio
12-19-2004, 08:52 AM
boring bar set, parting tools, bench grinder (if you dont have one), you prolly dont need steady and follow rest ATM unless your gona turn long pieces. Tailstock accesories you will need (chuck, drills, etc..). Probably a quick change tool post if you can fit it in yur budget. Just start with what you have and if you need something you dont got, then go buy it!