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Tuckerfan
01-12-2005, 12:01 AM
That's me on the left, holding the other end of the shank. (http://www.pctcast.net/CRW_0009.jpg) In case you're wondering, that's molten steel at around 3000F in the ladle. I some times do that eight or more times a day. Anybody wanna say they've got a tougher job than me? http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//wink.gif

BillH
01-12-2005, 12:05 AM
Cast steel? Foundry? Where do I submit the patterns for some castings? lol.

Forrest Addy
01-12-2005, 12:12 AM
Whatta wuss! 'Rassling tons of molten steel. I got a TOUGH job. I'm retired. I have decisions to make - where to go for breakfast, whether to hit on a particular gorgeous woman, counting my money, working for hours or days in my shop with nothing to interrupt me. I tell you it's tough.

And my breeding schedule; all those women chasing after my gametes and my person. Traveling to the far corners of the world solving intractible problems. Turning down all those dinner infitations and awards banquets. It's exhausting, I tell ya.

wierdscience
01-12-2005, 12:35 AM
Do sitting in the cabs of teetering 25ton cranes count? http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//biggrin.gif

Hot iron,BTDT,got the scabs to prove it.It is hot sweaty work thou,BB's always find a way in.

How about running flux core overhead,on the bottom of a Poggy boat in the middle of summer?Picture,stink,maggots,mosquitos,mayflies,mo lten flux in 100* heat,8hrs at a stint all while wearing full leathers.I hate repair yards.I WILL become a jeriatric proctologist before I ever do that again http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//biggrin.gif
Remind me to tell you guys about Starkist tuna sometime http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//eek.gif

Smokedaddy
01-12-2005, 12:44 AM
I’m retired as well. The biggest decision I had to make today was whether or not to cut my toe nails or pluck the nose hairs … or both.

-SD:

3 Phase Lightbulb
01-12-2005, 12:48 AM
<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by Tuckerfan:
http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//wink.gif[/img]</font>

My job is so difficult that it's not really possible, but I somehow manage to pull it off time and time again. I couldn't even begin to explain what I do as that's even more difficult. http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//smile.gif

-3Ph

Tuckerfan
01-12-2005, 12:57 AM
<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by 3 Phase Lightbulb:
My job is so difficult that it's not really possible, but I somehow manage to pull it off time and time again. I couldn't even begin to explain what I do as that's even more difficult. http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//smile.gif

-3Ph</font>
We must have the same supervisor: http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//Forum1/HTML/008330.html

Evan
01-12-2005, 01:10 AM
3ph,

You don't work for Microsoft do you? Nahh, they don't manage to pull it off.
................

It's a toss up between working in an egg carton factory or building barges for the Mackenzie River. Or, maybe cleaning out septic tanks. But really, trying to keep the computers of Williams Lake free of viruses, trojan horses and scumware has got to be the toughest job there is. There are some really smart programmers out there but I've been doing it since 1963.

torker
01-12-2005, 01:11 AM
Tougher? Laying on your back for 10 hrs a day air arcing out SS weld, running 600 amps with 1/2" rods. Work is 18 inches of the ground and you have to gouge up into the seam 6" AND not allowed to touch the main piece! Worse job I ever had...talk about burns! Or how about falling trees on a steep mountain side in 7 or 8 feet of snow! On snowshoes with 30 pounds of clothes (til they get wet!) and packing another 45 pounds of gear and -35Celsius. Nice part is, you get to pack all this crap and yourself 1/2 mile or so up the mountain first thing every morning...the last part is always through the deep snow and uphill...steep! Did that for 10 years...I'm still greedy enough to do it (big $$$) but too damn old and played out. Ya...theres lots of chitty work out there but that's what we do. I'd bet that suit is nice when it's 100 in the shade http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//biggrin.gif
Russ

3 Phase Lightbulb
01-12-2005, 01:26 AM
<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by Tuckerfan:
We must have the same supervisor: http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//Forum1/HTML/008330.html</font>


Hey, it looks like you had a little bit of computer fun there.... Let me know if you want to get serious with it... http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//smile.gif

I have a little Windows program I wrote that will drive anybody crazy. It's a program that installs itself as a Window's system service. When anyone is typing on the keyboard, it periodically inserts typos. The typos that are periodically generated feel like real typos to the user becuase things like 'l' will get acknowledged when the user typed 'k'.. K is right next to L on the keyboard. Also, the "shift" key will sometimes get ignored. the backspace key will sometimes do a double backspace. The space bar sometimes gets ignored as well as Enter/Return. It simulates all kinds of normal keyboard issues. I designed it so it's not obvious because it doesn't happen frequently enough.

If you want to see him smash the keyboard, let me know http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//smile.gif

-3Ph

3 Phase Lightbulb
01-12-2005, 02:11 AM
<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by Evan:
3ph,

You don't work for Microsoft do you? Nahh, they don't manage to pull it off.
................

It's a toss up between working in an egg carton factory or building barges for the Mackenzie River. Or, maybe cleaning out septic tanks. But really, trying to keep the computers of Williams Lake free of viruses, trojan horses and scumware has got to be the toughest job there is. There are some really smart programmers out there but I've been doing it since 1963. </font>

I don't work for Microsoft. Microsoft does pull it off and that's one of their problems. It's amaizing at how few problems there are relative to the size and complexity of their code base.

One really sad aspect about the software and hardware engineering discipline is that everything you worked on or designed/developed becomes irrevilant after 5 years. People that rely on past experience to pull them through, end up falling back and behind people with current experience.

I see it all the time. To stay on top I've been writing software almost every day for about 8 hours a day for the last 20 years and even then, only the last 5 or so years are relevant to what I'm doing today.

-3Ph

Joel
01-12-2005, 03:40 AM
Brilliant 3 Phase! I gotta get a copy of that program, assuming you will also tell me how to get rid of it. http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//biggrin.gif

Evan
01-12-2005, 10:46 AM
<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">It's amaizing at how few problems there are relative to the size and complexity of their code base.</font>

Bah. Sure, XP has around 25 million lines of code. But the problems are stupid rookie mistakes. Like not checking buffers. Why should it be possible to exploit IIS by sending a get request with a string of 257 letter "n"? That is how code red works, since patched. Why is IIS turned on by default?

Better yet, if you are running XP SP1 on a dialup and you have a local area network with file sharing enabled if you install SP2 the firewall on the dialup will then be disabled. When you go online on the dialup you will be sharing to the world. Why would anyone allow file sharing over a dialup by default? For that matter why would anyone allow file sharing to any public IP address?

Why would Microsoft allow the (supposedly local) messenger service talk to any IP address, anywhere?

I could go on for hours.

[This message has been edited by Evan (edited 01-12-2005).]

gkman11
01-12-2005, 12:18 PM
You guys think you got it rough? I'm the inspector who makes sure that every Harbor Freight tool meets our exacting quality standards before they are shipped to you. http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//wink.gif

3 Phase Lightbulb
01-12-2005, 12:52 PM
<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by Evan:
Bah. Sure, XP has around 25 million lines of code. But the problems are stupid rookie mistakes. Like not checking buffers. Why should it be possible to exploit IIS by sending a get request with a string of 257 letter "n"? That is how code red works, since patched. Why is IIS turned on by default?
</font>

Application deficiencies like buffer overruns plague all applications on all platforms. Microsoft simply has much more exposure.

If you want to exploit the ISS buffer overrun issue, sending a "get request with a string of 257 letter "n" characters" would only yield an ISS server crash. That sounds like what a rookie would do.

A more seasoned hacker would exploit the ISS buffer overrun by issuing a carefully crafted get request. A get request that overflows the local stack and over writes the return address with a pre-calculated fixed address within the buffer/get request. The result is that after ISS processes the get request, and eventually returns back from the subroutine, the original return address on the stack has been overwritten with a pointer to some new code.

This new code can make system calls to create/open/write/close data to a file then makes another system call to spawn a new process that starts executing the code that was written to disk/file. The code then fixes up the stack, and jumps to the return address (pre calculated) that was originally over written. The ISS server continues to run. There is also a new process running with anything the hacker desires to run.

I personally like to "run" a custom server that waits for me to connect on a special port, then spawns a shell (CMD.EXE) and redirects STDIN/STDOUT to the socket that I connect on... Now I can upload more tools that lets me manually patch the ISS server so it's not exploitable anymore.

After all, once your in, you don't want some rookie crashing ISS with a bunch of "n"'s and possibly exposing your presence by drawing attention to the system by some admin.

-3Ph

jkilroy
01-12-2005, 12:59 PM
Tough? Try roofing in Louisiana in the summer, all summer, all day. I bet it isn't a any hotter in that suit than it is on a tin roof at 2 in the afternoon. Oh, and if you want to lift something to call it tough, don't forget climbing a 32 ft extension ladder carrying two bundles of shingles on your shoulder, say 50 times a day.

I thought that job sucked till I spent a summer outside in a rubber suit sand blasting, which was much worse. I must have sweat off 5 pounds a day. Bad, but not as bad as the other two, was steam cleaning forklifts 8 to 10 hours a day.

I am sure glad I got an education after all that.

Evan
01-12-2005, 01:17 PM
Code Red doesn't just send a string of n's. It is followed by executable code that exploits a vuln in the indexing service. Once that happens the rest of the code is uploaded. It also does patch the vuln as well after taking advantage of it.

The string looks like this:


/default.ida?NNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNN NNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNN
NNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNN NNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNN
NNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNN NNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNN
NNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNN%u9090%u6858%ucbd3%u780 1%u9090%u6858%ucbd3%
u7801%u9090%u6858%ucbd3%u7801%u9090%u9090%u8190%u0 0c3%u0003%u8b00%u531
b%u53ff%u0078%u0000%u00=a

hoffman
01-12-2005, 02:53 PM
I'm a nurse and I had to give a big fat woman a shot in the @ss the other day...

------------------
Hoffman in Warner Robins Ga

Evan
01-12-2005, 03:08 PM
You win.

Allan Waterfall
01-12-2005, 03:17 PM
<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by hoffman:
I'm a nurse and I had to give a big fat woman a shot in the @ss the other day...

</font>

Presume you used a syringe. http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//biggrin.gif

Allan

3 Phase Lightbulb
01-12-2005, 03:20 PM
<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by Allan Waterfall:
Presume you used a syringe. http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//biggrin.gif

Allan</font>


ROTFLMAO http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//biggrin.gif

-3Ph

Spin Doctor
01-12-2005, 04:00 PM
Tough, I'll tell you what's tough. Wading through all the drivel in this thread. That's tough. http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//rolleyes.gif

J Tiers
01-12-2005, 04:49 PM
<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by jkilroy:
Oh, and if you want to lift something to call it tough, don't forget climbing a 32 ft extension ladder carrying two bundles of shingles on your shoulder, say 50 times a day.

</font>


Union here finally fixed it up that the shingles have to be delivered on the roof by a truck with extension conveyor. Wusses..... http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//biggrin.gif

But after what one company did to my copper gutters with their ladders and two 250lb guys hauling bundles up http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//mad.gif .....I like the new system too.

3 Phase Lightbulb
01-12-2005, 04:58 PM
<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by J Tiers:

Union here finally fixed it up that the shingles have to be delivered on the roof by a truck with extension conveyor. Wusses..... http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//biggrin.gif

But after what one company did to my copper gutters with their ladders and two 250lb guys hauling bundles up http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//mad.gif .....I like the new system too.</font>


I found that putting on a new roof is easy... It's cleaning up the mess you made from ripping the old one off is where all the work is.

-3Ph

Tuckerfan
01-12-2005, 05:42 PM
jkilroy, thanks to my education, this the job I have. Thank God for the American educational system! http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//wink.gif (BTW, that photo was taken in July, in TN.)

3 Phase Lightbulb, I'll take a copy of that program. http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//biggrin.gif

Arcane
01-12-2005, 07:06 PM
Tough is having to pick your buddy up and transport him to the hospital after he has almost electrocuted himself on 72KV with a 6950A fault curent..

Dave Opincarne
01-12-2005, 09:27 PM
<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by Arcane:
Tough is having to pick your buddy up and transport him to the hospital after he has almost electrocuted himself on 72KV with a 6950A fault curent..</font>

Sort of a cross between pork and popcorn huh? http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//eek.gif

Dave Opincarne
01-12-2005, 09:35 PM
Summer job in college working at a paper recycling plant. Would get container roll offs from the local grocery stores. There was a grocery stike that summer so the scabs weren't too good about following the guidlines about what was recyclable. Sides of beef come into the store in plastic bags wraped in cardbord. The initial trims got thrown into the bag and the whole thing would get thrown in with the box (against regs) and sent to the cardboard compacter. Well guess who got to pull that bag out of the compacted cardboard after it had been sitting in 100* weather for a week. Guess what it smelled like. Guess what it looked like. Guess just how full of magots it was.

Dave

mochinist
01-12-2005, 09:50 PM
My first real job was when I was 13, I worked in a melon packing shed during my summer break. We worked 10 to 14 hour days depending on the market prices for melons that day. My second job the next summer was chopping weeds in cotton fields for ten hours a day. I grew up in Parker, Arizona which is one of the hottest places int the states, during those summer months the temperature would range from 110 F to 120 F and let me tell you when you are in a cotton field there is no such thing as a dry heat. In my early twenties I was a framer here in Phoenix, Az another hot ass job caring plywood and 2 x 4's, I used to sweat so much that I would literally run out of sweat.

I sure do like machining in a shop under a roof even if we only have swamp coolers.

J Tiers
01-12-2005, 10:24 PM
<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by 3 Phase Lightbulb:

I found that putting on a new roof is easy... It's cleaning up the mess you made from ripping the old one off is where all the work is.

-3Ph

</font>

Yah, I've done that too. Entire roof, shingles and sheathing. And replaced it.

Replacing was much easier.

But that one was only a 1 story.

larry_g
01-12-2005, 11:01 PM
How about having the job of skinning dead animals at the rendering plant? The rendering plant is where you drop off the carcasses of animals that have died in the fields or wherever. Whatched a chap out there on a hot summer day skinning the rotting carcasses. The smell was BAD. Came time to eat, he grabbed his lunch bucket, wiped his hands on his backside, sit down on a dead cow and proceeded to eat. Damned near lost it right there.
lg
no neat sig line

Carl
01-13-2005, 03:00 PM
There's a lot more in that picture than first meets the eye...

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v35/lathefan/e3a35e30.jpg

Carl
01-13-2005, 03:15 PM
Speaking of tough jobs, I remember pedaling a big ol' bicycle up a steep, long, icy hill at three o'clock in the morning, below zero, wind blowing, with 100+ pounds of newspapers strapped to the handlebars, realizing that after I delivered those papers, I had to ride back two miles down that icy hill to get the other half of my load of papers (another 100+ pounds) and get them to the top of the hill to deliver them. Of course, I was only twelve years old at the time, so I guess i didn't know what tough was yet http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//biggrin.gif

DBW
01-13-2005, 03:28 PM
<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by Carl:
There's a lot more in that picture than first meets the eye...

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v35/lathefan/e3a35e30.jpg </font>

I wonder what kind of induction furnace they're
using?

lynnl
01-13-2005, 03:31 PM
Toughest thing I remember about my paper route was trying to collect from some of the tightwads on my route. Looking back on it, I can't believe some people could do that to a kid.

3 Phase Lightbulb
01-13-2005, 04:27 PM
<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by lynnl:
Toughest thing I remember about my paper route was trying to collect from some of the tightwads on my route. Looking back on it, I can't believe some people could do that to a kid.</font>

I grew up on Mercer Island, WA (Off East Mercer Way) and my paper route consisted of all of the houses off East Mercer Way. Delivering the papers was easy because there were huge banks of mailboxes in large groups that I just had to put papers in scattered over a 1 mile stretch on East Mercer Way. When you drive down East Mercer Way, you don't see very many houses, but you'll see large banks of mail boxes.

The problem was, collecting money every month from my customers. The 80+ houses I delivered the paper to were scattered all over the place and most people had LONG private roads off East mercer way down to their houses. It actually took more than 30 days to collect from everyone so I was always behind.

-3Ph



[This message has been edited by 3 Phase Lightbulb (edited 01-13-2005).]

Thrud
01-13-2005, 06:25 PM
Hey, howcome you are in a firesuit and the guy in the middle is wearing a t-shirt and sun glasses - WIMP! http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//biggrin.gif

...or is that really just an Aluminum foil beanie to keep you from getting "stoopud" vibes from hanging with "Pete Puma"? http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//biggrin.gif

Joel
01-13-2005, 07:04 PM
Speaking of hot; how about putting on heavy turnout gear, heavy gloves, and an SCBA on your back. You are covered in thick insulating gear from head to toe, no skin exposed anywhere. Then go out on a nice hot Texas summer day, working your butt off for maybe hours at a time in or around a very hot burning building while the adrenaline flows. You get to drag around a heavy hose and fight high nozzle reaction forces because the pump operator is convinced that more pressure puts the fire out faster.

I am sure not complaining as I’ll go do it again next time with a big grin on my face. But I do get soaking wet in just a couple of minutes and it’s not the most comfortable place to be.

Tuckerfan
01-13-2005, 07:25 PM
<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by DBW:
I wonder what kind of induction furnace they're
using?</font>

It's an Inductotherm. Not sure of the model number.

Oh, and Thrud, Big John's been running the furnace now for 11 years, so he's got plenty of scar tissue to protect him from the heat! http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//biggrin.gif

gizmo2
01-13-2005, 07:44 PM
My question is for Torker. Let's see, you climbed up the mountain in the morning with all that stuff, then at then end of the day it was a long hike uphill? That WOULD suck, you'd really want some gravity on your side at some point in the day! Reminds me of Tommie Pickles grandpa on Rugrats. Everything was fffifffteen miles, uphill, both ways. Here in Wyo, everything is into the wind, no matter which way yur goin'. I think it was Mother Nature that invented the bitch slap...

spope14
01-13-2005, 08:08 PM
<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by 3 Phase Lightbulb:
My job is so difficult that it's not really possible, but I somehow manage to pull it off time and time again. I couldn't even begin to explain what I do as that's even more difficult. http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//smile.gif

-3Ph</font>

I am the mayor of my city, and I teach high school young males between the ages of 15 to 18 to run dangerous powerful machinery that can both kill them, and make metal objects that can without high degrees of supervision be turned into weapons or puffin' stuff.

Does self imposed mental abuse count?

Can't make this stuff up

3 Phase Lightbulb
01-13-2005, 09:59 PM
<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by Joel:
You get to drag around a heavy hose and fight high nozzle reaction forces because the pump operator is convinced that more pressure puts the fire out faster.
</font>

What's the big deal? I take a leak about 8 times a day! http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//biggrin.gif

-3Ph

chipeater
01-14-2005, 12:14 PM
Hey mochinist,

My college buddy is from Parker. You don't
know any of the Hoefts, do you?

Steve

3 Phase Lightbulb
01-14-2005, 01:51 PM
<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by spope14:
I am the mayor of my city, and I teach high school young males between the ages of 15 to 18 to run dangerous powerful machinery that can both kill them, and make metal objects that can without high degrees of supervision be turned into weapons or puffin' stuff.

Does self imposed mental abuse count?

Can't make this stuff up</font>


Hey, playing SimCity doesn't count! http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//wink.gif

-3Ph

torker
01-14-2005, 02:12 PM
gizmo...No snow in this summer pic but you'll get the idea.This is what I meant. See where the skid trails end across the timber face? The "last part" is where you have to climb up through the REAL deep snow that hasn't been thoroughly flattened by other skidding activity. Other times you may leave an area for a week or two in which time it can snow several feet. You then get to pack all your stuff from the bottom of the mountain to where you left off falling. You do this because the cheap bastard you are working for won't send a machine to that area to haul your equipment up for you. BTW...This is NOT a particularly steep area.
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v210/torker/128b3bb4.jpg
Russ

[This message has been edited by torker (edited 01-14-2005).]

spope14
01-14-2005, 08:59 PM
No sim city, really am a mayor of a 14000 person city. Also teach kids to make things and such on and so forth as mentioned above. Do I mention I also have a 14 year old daughter that looks about 20 and the boys are always calling and such?