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audrey
01-14-2005, 02:27 PM
Are there any websites devoted to the small home shop machinist delving into firearm projects,, Thankyou My husband has taken an interest into big bore handguns and rifles as of lately. .338 lapau ar-30 rifles and 45-70 handguns.

44-henry
01-14-2005, 03:02 PM
Check out www.brownells.com (http://www.brownells.com)

In their literature section they have several books that might suite his interest, including the complete article from the Home Shop Machinist on building a falling block action which should be suitable for the 45-70 at least. There are also a couple of other books available which delve into this subject, and several books by DeHaas on single shots and bolt actions which feature some gunsmithing related topics.

Above all safety needs to be stressed when working with any firearm related project. Building an action which could handle the 338 Lapua involves and exceptionally skilled machinist, and an extremely good understanding of alloys and heat treatment. I would say to be successful and safe, one should be able to accomplish just about every other task that a machinist might be called upon to do successfully, I am not yet at this stage. One mistake could be fatal in the finished product; in addition to this, there are also several legal issues to deal with. I restrict my own ventures into gunsmithing to blackpowder firearms, I can bypass many of the legal hassles, and the pressures involved with black powder are considerably less than those encountered with modern smokeless high pressure cartridges.

Rustybolt
01-14-2005, 03:20 PM
Search around for -roderous custom guns- on the internet. I think it's a pay-to-use site now, but you can brouse around. You have to be a member to view the good stuff though.They have at least one single action rifle print there.

IOWOLF
01-14-2005, 05:33 PM
OUR HOSTS have plans for a falling block rifle but can be converted to a pistol.

G.A. Ewen
01-14-2005, 05:49 PM
Whoa audrey, you are heading for trouble just thinking about that in Canada. Making your own fire arms here is strictly taboo unless you have permits many. These permits are damn near impossible to obtain.

crossthreaded
01-14-2005, 11:06 PM
Mr. G.A. Ewen, I think it's both sad & outrageous that governments think they can forbid the development of firearms by legitimate private citizens. I speak as a US citizen, but I reguard the right to own (& make & modify) firearms as the most basic of rights. In the past designers were not necessarily employees of Govt. arsenals & prime contractors. The mythical stature of people like Eugene Stoner, John Garand, & "Carbine" Williams survives because they made direct contributions that helped end World War II. They all were at least initially private citizens, except Mt. Williams: at least in the Jimmy Stewart film was a guest of a Southern prison. I realize you were only stating facts, but I do deplore the present state of affairs.

x39
01-14-2005, 11:18 PM
crossthreaded- I agree. The greatest firearm developers were all civilians. Wm.B. Ruger developed a prototype light machine gun while attending college (University of South Carolina if memory serves me right). The university allowed him the use of their machine shop for his r&d work. Imagine what the response to a similarly enterprising young man would be in these times!

G.A. Ewen
01-14-2005, 11:30 PM
<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by crossthreaded:
Mr. G.A. Ewen, I think it's both sad & outrageous that governments think they can forbid the development of firearms by legitimate private citizens. I speak as a US citizen, but I reguard the right to own (& make & modify) firearms as the most basic of rights. In the past designers were not necessarily employees of Govt. arsenals & prime contractors. The mythical stature of people like Eugene Stoner, John Garand, & "Carbine" Williams survives because they made direct contributions that helped end World War II. They all were at least initially private citizens, except Mt. Williams: at least in the Jimmy Stewart film was a guest of a Southern prison. I realize you were only stating facts, but I do deplore the present state of affairs.</font>


crossthread, please don't misunderstand me. I think that the firearm laws in Canada are not only ridiculous but they are also useless. Criminals have no problem getting guns here and honest people face outrageous restictions.

My comments to Audrey were intended remind her of the problems that she could face if she persues this coarse.

George

toolmakerjim
01-15-2005, 12:06 AM
crossthreaded;
john garand was a employee at the springfield armory. the really unbeliveable thing about the M-1 is that it was subbmitted to the army in 1937 and wasnt adopted until '41...jim

bernie
01-15-2005, 12:13 AM
George is correct on the state of things here in Canada. I would not doubt, that Audrey gets a visit from the RCMP just for asking such a question.

Yankee1
01-15-2005, 12:33 AM
Hello,
Check put this web-site.
http://www.practicalmachinist.com/ubb/ultimatebb.php?ubb=forum;f=16

pete913
01-15-2005, 10:59 AM
Talking about Garand, Stoner and a few other notables is interesting. I've read a few things about Stoner in particular, and its amazing to me how he was sabotaged, set up, blocked and discouraged by practically every level of the US government and military with his invention at the outset. Its another case just like the Christie suspension for tanks, which should have been adopted by our military well before WW2, and did actually wind up on the Russian T34 tank.

audrey
01-15-2005, 01:07 PM
Thanx for scaring me. My husband Hates prison food. We will not bother with any firearm projects. Thanx for the replies.

quasi
01-15-2005, 01:45 PM
<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by G.A. Ewen:
Whoa audrey, you are heading for trouble just thinking about that in Canada. Making your own fire arms here is strictly taboo unless you have permits many. These permits are damn near impossible to obtain.</font>

Actually, you can make your own firearm in Canada as long as it is not a prohibited firearm and you are making it for yourself and not manufacturing them. There is even a form on the canadian firearms center that you can download for registering self made firearms.

If you are making them to sell then you need a manufactures liscense, I think its $1000 or $1200.

Rustybolt
01-15-2005, 02:04 PM
If it's illegal in Canada how come the sell DIY parts kits? I made a nice SiG 229 clone from a kit sold by DLask in Canada.
Audry. Check the laws. I'm sure it's legal if it's only for personal use.

Jesse168
01-15-2005, 03:54 PM
Go to this web site and make your request. Several people on this site build and modify firearms. They can also give you the legal statis concerning building your own personal firearm. Here in the USA you can build for yourself. It is better to build your rifle around a bought action. You have a lot less problems if you ever decide to part with it.

http://outdoorsbest.zeroforum.com/zeroforum?id=39