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Thread: Unsticking an engine

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Posts
    279

    Post Unsticking an engine

    Here is a method to unstick a frozen engine that I thought I would share with you. It is not my method but from a guy named James Monroe. I read it on another forum for old cars, then I asked a chemist friend for his opinion, which follows:

    "Drain the crankcase. Through the carburator neck, pour drained out motor oil. The worse, the better! Fill the engine. Remove spark plugs to let trapped air out. Put the plugs back in. Take the exhaust loose at the outlet and plug it. Go by the engine each day and top the oil off with more of the same. Drained-out motor oil from a diesel seems to work more quickly. You will find that the crankcase is filling. That is the oil getting past the rings. It takes patience, but after a month or so, you will find the engine will turn without excessive force. Clean up the mess you have created, turn the engine over a bit to clear the oil from the cylinders, replace the spark plugs and start it up. You won't be able to see the house or shop for the smoke, but the engine will clear up without stuck valves, rings or lifters. Most of the great guru's don't believe this. That is because they either haven't tried it or left out a step. Fresh motor oil will not work, period. It must be contaminated with acid ect. On a Model A engine, of course, you will have to fill through the spark plug holes. If you follow these steps I have outlined, you will swear by this method of unsticking engines. "

    Now the chemist's opinion:
    "From a chemical point it makes sense. The S (Sulfur) in gasoline and diesel fuel burns to SO2 and SO3 (Sulfur dioxide and trioxide) during combustion. Add water (also a product of combustion) and you get H2SO3 and H2SO4 Sulfurous and Sulfuric Acid. Also explains why the used oil from a diesel works better, much more Sulfur in diesel fuel.
    Beside the Sulfur products, there are various other acids, Nitrous and Nitric for example.
    I would recommend adding oil through the sparkplug holes to cylinders that do not have a intake valve open to admit the oil from the intake manifold. "

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Spokane, Wa
    Posts
    2,327

    Post

    Interesting approach to unstick a motor before you take it apart and do it the right way.

    I would not try to start it after it was stuck that bad.



    ------------------
    Gene
    Gene

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Southern Oregon
    Posts
    597

    Post

    Hi
    Most diesel engines have some kerosene in their oil. Kerosene has been used for that same purpose in the past.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Posts
    279

    Post

    I think the secret might be in the acid content which allows it to attack rusted rings and valve guides, not just the oil crud.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Oregon Coast
    Posts
    989

    Post

    Hi, I've not tried it myself, but a friend used Coca-Cola to free up a seized old Ford engine. Filled the Cylinders with Coke and waited. Only took a couple of days. The instructions he had stated the engine must be torn down and cleaned immediately after it becomes free! Not doing so would only freeze it back up again similar to being sugared. Any one else heard of this method?
    Mel


    [This message has been edited by lugnut (edited 04-13-2005).]
    _____________________________________________
    Mel Larsen
    Remember when your cup holder sat next to you and wore a poodle skirt?

  6. #6
    IOWOLF Guest

    Post

    TO unstick a tractor engine we use another tractors hydrulic system. Remove plugs make an adaptor to go between hyd. hose and plug hole and bump the hyd. valve till engine moves. simple between us we have done 5 or 6 this way. could work on a car or truck.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2001
    Location
    Maine
    Posts
    6,739

    Post

    Shucks, I thought the way to do it was to put a piece of 4x4 on top of a piston and belt it with a 12-pound sledgehammer.

    ----------
    Try to make a living, not a killing. -- Utah Phillips
    Don't believe everything you know. -- Bumper sticker
    Everybody is ignorant, only on different subjects. -- Will Rogers
    There are lots of people who mistake their imagination for their memory. - Josh Billings
    Law of Logical Argument - Anything is possible if you don't know what you are talking about.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Vici, Ok.
    Posts
    1,238

    Post

    There is a flaw in the idea of filling only through the carb. The oil would only reach the cylinders that had an open intake valve. Too have any chance of it working properly you would need to fill through the sparkplug holes also. There is a procduct out there called Gibbs that works the best of anything I have found. James
    Sorry Duct just read your post again and seen you took note of the intake valve situation.

    [This message has been edited by J. Randall (edited 04-13-2005).]

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Nazareth, PA
    Posts
    2,399

    Post

    SGW,

    your method is the same one i use. if an engine frees up enough with used motor oil to let it set a month and then start it and run it, then it wasn't properly "stuck" to begin with.


    i wish i had some pics of the inside of the engine on my John Deere 40U when i hauled it home. the rustcicles hanging off the bottoms of the pistons looked pretty, but weren't exactly good for the engine.

    andy b.
    The danger is not that computers will come to think like men - but that men will come to think like computers. - some guy on another forum not dedicated to machining

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2001
    Location
    Central Ohio
    Posts
    734

    Post

    What I have seen f-i-l do was to soak old parts such as carbs and the like in a bucket of very nasty old motor oil. He said that in a week or two that they could be disassembeled easily where as before fittings were corroded.
    mark costello-Low speed steel

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