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Thread: Grizzly G9972Z 11x26 lathe

  1. #11
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Posts
    388

    Post

    Consider that 150 RPM is the slowest speed.
    Large diameters or threading may be difficult at that speed. Also, is there power crossfeed?
    does it matter to you? How big is the drive belt? the 9x20's had a puny belt - 5 mm wide I think. It would be good to see what you are condisering buying in person. Maybe Grizzly can tell you of someone nearby who has the same machine.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Ct
    Posts
    967

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    Thanks for the info!

    That seems like it'd suit my needs quite well.
    Small bits, fiddly things, turned & burnished doo dads, mostly for motorcycles and tractors.
    And at 500 lbs. it's a stout device for sure.
    Any of that come apart for ease of movement?
    Len

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Posts
    202

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    <font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by Sprocket:
    Consider that 150 RPM is the slowest speed.
    Large diameters or threading may be difficult at that speed. Also, is there power crossfeed?
    does it matter to you? How big is the drive belt? the 9x20's had a puny belt - 5 mm wide I think. It would be good to see what you are condisering buying in person. Maybe Grizzly can tell you of someone nearby who has the same machine.
    </font>

    The main drive belt on the 11x26 is also much more substantial over the 9x20 belt. It is a cogged belt measuring 3/4" in width. It looks much like this:



    The secondary belt is a 3/8" V belt (like an alternator belt on older (pre serpentine belt) cars. The rest of the geartrain is all metal gears.

    There is no power crossfeed on this lathe, which is no big deal to me. Unless you do alot of facing of large parts it wont be much of an inconvenience.


  4. #14
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Posts
    202

    Post

    <font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by QSIMDO:
    Thanks for the info!

    That seems like it'd suit my needs quite well.
    Small bits, fiddly things, turned & burnished doo dads, mostly for motorcycles and tractors.
    And at 500 lbs. it's a stout device for sure.
    Any of that come apart for ease of movement?
    </font>
    When I have to move mine I pull off the chuck. (It is threaded onto the spindle and you just use the chuck keys to loosen it). I also pull of the tailstock and the crosslide. I suppose if one wished to further lighten the load they could also pull the motor off but I never bother. I have moved mine three times. Once from the crate to the bench. Once into the back of my truck for when I moved to another house. And finally from the truck to the bench again. The first two moves were accomplished by four adults with no mechanical assistance. The last move was done with a 2-Ton engine hoist like this one:


    I went out and purchased the hoist just so I could move my machines around without bothering anyone. It works well and folds up for easy storage. Not too shabby for $220!




    [This message has been edited by Schutzhund (edited 04-25-2005).]

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Posts
    202

    Post

    <font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by claw:
    WOW!! thanx for the pics. It really helps. I guess what I meant by size is how far the chuck will open to accept a piece.I wish this conversation would have taken place a year ago Id be making chips right now.</font>
    The 3 Jaw chuck that comes with the lathe is 5" in diameter and the jaws open up enough to hold a piece of 2-1/2" round stock. For round work larger than 2-1/2" in diameter a larger chuck could be fitted to the machine.


  6. #16

    Post

    No cross feed? Doesnt the lever on the carriage switch to that?

  7. #17

    Post

    [QUOTE]Consider that 150 RPM is the slowest speed

    I'm a rank amateur too, but I think the 60 rpm minimum on my 12 X 36 is still too high.

    For a cutting speed of 100 fpm at 150 rpm, your work dia is about 2 1/2". As the diameter increases you get farther away from ideal cutting speeds.

    With 60 rpm, I get 100 fpm at close to 6" dia. All depends on what work you want to do, I guess.

    Also: I think you said this was the only board you had found so far? It's excellent; so is http://www.chaski-test.com/ubb/ubbthreads.php


  8. #18
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Posts
    100

    Post

    Schutzhund
    The lathe in your picture doesn't match anything in the 2005 Grizzly catalog. What is it?

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Ct
    Posts
    967

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    Mac, page 459.
    They show "new gear box" instead of the old quick change.
    Len

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Posts
    202

    Post

    claw- The lever you are talking about is for engaging the carriage feed. With a flip of that lever the carriage moves to the left under power for turning operations. A power crossfeed is for FACING operations. It moves the crosslide away from you (when you are standing infront of the lathe) to facilitate facing operations. This machine does not have a power crossfeed. For facing operations you must turn the crossfeed wheel by hand.

    Mac1 - The lathe in the pictures above is actually the older Grizzly Model # G9972. The machine I have and the machine we are discussing is a Grizzly Model # G9972Z. The "Z" series is a slightly improved model over the plain G9972. The only differences I can see between the two are that the "Z" series version has two dials on the gearbox as opposed to the older lever design for switching gears, the on/off switch has been upgraded to include a safety cover that locks the switch to off when the cover is closed (in other words closing the cover will turn the machine off), and there is a small "window" for viewing the oil level of the gearbox. You can see these differences in this pic:




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