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Thread: Nesting square tubing?

  1. #1

    Post Nesting square tubing?

    I want to make a wood lathe tool grinding jig like the Wolverine setup. I need square tubing that has smaller square tubing ina sliding fit.
    If I buy the readily available 1" x.120 and 3/4" x .120, will the 3/4" tube fit inside the 1" tube without any fettling? I'm not sure how the corners internally might interfere with the smaller tube so thought I'd ask.
    As an alternative, McMaster has "nestable square tube" which can be had in 1-1/4 x .105 and 1" x .105 and they claim that you can doa ll sorts of fixturing by nesting the two sizes together - the extra 30 thou of slop would be unwelcome though if the .120" stuff fits.
    TIA.
    Ken

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2001
    Location
    OREGON
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    358

    Post

    I've never tried the sizes you mention. I wouldn't worry much about the corners, a little file/grinder work should take care of that, if it becomes a issue. However, the welded seam inside the tube might be a big issue. Some 1" I have here is pretty rough.

    Tim

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    132

    Post

    There will be a good bit of slop left depending on the gauge of the 1" tubing. I think 11 gauge would do fine with the 3/4" nested in it. I have made several jack stands using larger tubing that work fine, but never tried to do what you are with the working platform for the wood lathe. I know I have used 16 gauge on a deer stand with 3/4" nested in the leg for strength and there was a good bit of slop left to put the two together.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    Nashville, TN
    Posts
    169

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    I made a rig like the Wolverine. I used angle iron for the base to hold the sliding square tube. I put a flat plate on 4 1/4" studs on top to lock it in place. I did this so I could replace the square tube other sizes and shapes to hold other tables and fixtures. It works very well for lathe chisels but I havn't figured the the trick to making a workable side grind on a bowl gouge yet.
    Good luck with this project
    Joe

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Beaumont, TX
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    7,179

    Post

    I've used the McMaster's stuff and found it OK for my application. Yes, there was some slop.

    You might consider using some thin sheet Teflon in the joints to provide a nicer fit and better slideing characteristics.

    Paul A.
    Paul A.

    Make it fit.
    You can't win and there is a penalty for trying!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    On the Oil Coast,USA
    Posts
    16,823

    Post

    Ken,on common WELDED seam tubing the weld is the reason it most times won't fit.
    The weld can be removed,but it is a PITA.

    The telescoping tubing is worth the money,but all you really need is the female side,after all it doesn't matter what the id of the inner tube looks like right?
    I just need one more tool,just one!

  7. #7

    Post

    Right Darin.
    Although when you're buying a small amount, buying both inner and outer isn't bad. McMaster doesn't have .120 standard tube - just the 1/16" thick stuff which I think might be a bit flimsy.
    And no-one cheaper seems to have the nestable stuff so it looks like McMaster is the only game in town for a small order.

    Has anyone actually tried (or can try) 1" od square tube in the 1-1/4 x0.12 though? It sounds tight, but it may be perfect - I was just hopin' that someone had done it or had two pieces on hand.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Posts
    20

    Post

    Ken,
    I am just starting the same jig. After looking at the Wolverine in the store, I noted a few things. One is they turned the tubes onto a corner so the inner tube nests properly without high tolerances. Also, if I remember correctly, when I used it, there isn't much pressure on the fixture, so the parts really don't need to be super heavy duty.
    I picked up some structural tube from ASAP - 3/4" sq.- 18GA/0.049 structural tube and 5/8" sq.-16GA/0.065 structural tube. They nest well with only 0.025" difference. When turned onto the corner, the parts slide well and stay in alignment. If you want to go heavier, I think they have larger sizes that would nest well.

    For plans, I'm going off of a picture with basic dimensions from a friend that made one. Do you have any drawings or specific dimensions available?

    Wes

    [This message has been edited by GM54210 (edited 08-01-2005).]

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    On the Oil Coast,USA
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    16,823

    Post

    "Has anyone actually tried (or can try) 1" od square tube in the 1-1/4 x0.12 though? It sounds tight, but it may be perfect - I was just hopin' that someone had done it or had two pieces on hand. "

    No,I don't think it will fit,since the welds usually stick down more than .015"

    I'll grab a piece or two at work tommorow and check.

    I just need one more tool,just one!

  10. #10

    Post

    .




    [This message has been edited by 3 Phase Lightbulb (edited 08-17-2005).]
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