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Thread: HOMEMADE DIES

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
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    1

    Post HOMEMADE DIES

    NOT SURE IF THIS IS THE CORRECT PLACE TO ASK THIS, BUT HERE GOES.
    A FRIEND IS MAKING A SET OF DIES TO STAMP LOUVERS IN SHEET METAL AND HE WANTS ME TO HARDEN THEM FOR HIM [I AM A PART TIME KNIFE MAKER] WHAT I NEED TO KNOW IS WHAT HARDNESS SHOULD A SET OF DIES BE. THE STEEL IS O-1 AND THE SIZE IS 1/4 X 5/8 X 6" AND 1/4 X 3/4 X 6". THANKS FOR ANY HELP OR SUGGESTIONS ABOUT THIS .
    LARRY

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Posts
    7,969

    Talking

    sorry my mistake my eyesights getting worse thought you were advertising home made pies Alistair
    Please excuse my typing as I have a form of parkinsons disease

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2001
    Location
    Maine
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    Post

    "It all depends." See if you can find a copy of "Tool Steel Simplified," put out by the Carpenter Steel Company. I'm virtually certain it's out of print, but used copies are around. It will explain the "it all depends" a lot better than I can.

    Since I assume the sheetmetal being stamped is pretty mild stuff, I doubt you need the dies too hard. I know almost nothing about die design though.
    ----------
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  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
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    Won't be much about 0-1 in that book, I have a copy. Unless they updated it more recently, mine has other names for steel types.

    Plus, they make the point that composition AND treatment of the steel BOTH have a large effect on the performance. So something close in composition may be widely different in actual performance.

    Theoretical hardening temp should run according to composition, though, THAT is in the book IIRC.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    webster, ma
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    Post

    worked in a sheet metal shop for years. Many times regular cold rolled steel was used for press brake dies. But then to make louvers you are not bending, but punching. to do a few, you may not have to harden at all for light gage steel, maybe .030 or less, but for long use or heavier material, you probably need close to 50 to 60 Rockwell (C).
    Very much the same as for any other punching operation. They are not to be "glass hard" but harder than "flame hardened" dies.
    gvasale

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Posts
    388

    Post

    Someone (I think maybe Metal Mite) showed engine louvers he had made. Maybe he could advise you on this. Cute little switcher.

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