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Thread: Childs horizontal mill

  1. #1
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    Post Childs horizontal mill

    I recently aquired a Childs horizontal mill; the name is ironic because the mill is about childs' size. The table is 2 1/2" X 10", with a single 'T' slot that's about 5/16" wide. The machine is mounted on a cabinet that's about 15" X 16" X 36" high. As the base is made from 1/4" plate, it's quite heavy. The motor is in the cabinet, with 2 jackshafts w/step pulleys to drive the spindle. Spindle has a #1 M.T., with an overarm and outboard bearing like most horizontal mills. It also included a #1 M.T. -> 1/2" milling adaptor for woodruff key cutters, etc. The main spindle is 5/8" diameter, with a bunch of spacers and a nut to hold whatever cutters you want to use.

    My question is: given that I have a B'Port w/DROs and a pretty complete set of tooling, what might I use this thing for? Does it justify the space it takes up?

  2. #2
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    it will do many things a bridgeport wont.
    a horizontal; attachment for a bridgeport is very expensive,even second hand .........then it's not up to much.
    horizontal cutters are cheap on ebay too.
    Keep it .

    is it one of these..


    all the best..mark

    btw ..........little mills like that sell for a lot on ebay because of there appeal to model engineers for their sheds etc

    [This message has been edited by aboard_epsilon (edited 10-16-2005).]

    [This message has been edited by aboard_epsilon (edited 10-16-2005).]

  3. #3
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    Mark,
    Yes, my unit looks like the picture you posted, I assume from Tony's UK Lathes site..?? His description of the Childs Mill was of a somewhat larger outfit than mine.

    Although I can see it being somewhat easier to do certain things w/ this mill, such as using a slitting saw, it seems like the B'Port will work for most of those purposes. The P.O. used it in some gunsmith work, such as slitting ramrod ends and barrel laps. I even have his fixture for the latter. Several slitting saw blades and a few Woodruff key cutters were included.

    Guess I'll keep it around for a while.

    Thanks!!

  4. #4
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    Dec 2004
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    keep it as a nice little machine to do quick secondary operations on without having to tear down whatever's set up on the bridgeport.

    if that doesn't sound like a good idea, just remember that this here college student always accepts donations to his own garage shop...
    -paul

  5. #5
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    The only downfall of small mills like that (or the Lewis I have) is travel and daylight, plus possibly too high an arbor speed.

    Travel and daylight (max space under the arbor) you are stuck with, speed you may be able to adjust with pulley sizes.

    Most of those small mills spin the arbor at 100 to 150 rpm minimum. Most people feel that's fine, but as one who must be the only one working ugly materials, I find 35 RPM to be a fine minimum. With smaller cutters, faster is OK. I can take a 4" cutter no problem, so that puts me in teh "zone" for nasty stuff like 4140 prehardened, etc (what I made my extra arbors from).

    I think you will like it. If not, you should be able to move it on for a good price.

    Oh, yeah, they rarely have power feed, get used to cranking!

    That one looks pretty stout for its size. That's good. You can always make an overarm support if it chatters too much.

    [This message has been edited by J Tiers (edited 10-16-2005).]
    1601 2045 1412 2321

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    Hashim Khan

  6. #6
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    If I put this mill to use to amount to anything, I'll probably change the motor. I have a 1/2 Hp DC motor laying around, and I know where to get a controller. That'll solve the speed problem, plus eliminate the need for changing belts. I put one of those on my wife's wood lathe and it works GREAT!

  7. #7
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    Maybe..........

    When you slow a motor, the torque stays nearly the same, but the RPM obviously drop. The net is that the power output to the load drops also.

    For low speeds you still need a belt or gear change unless you are satisfied with a great deal less power at low speeds.

    I have a 1/4 HP motor on a somewhat bigger mill, and have NEVER stalled it. All my speed limits have been to avoid burning up cutters.

    [This message has been edited by J Tiers (edited 10-17-2005).]
    1601 2045 1412 2321

    Keep eye on ball.
    Hashim Khan

  8. #8
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    <font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by J Tiers:

    Travel and daylight (max space under the arbor) you are stuck with, [This message has been edited by J Tiers (edited 10-16-2005).]
    </font>
    glad you explained - learn something new everyday. imo that is the biggest constraint on a mill. of course everyone's projects are different, but get that MT3 1" drill in an R8 adapter with a big workpiece and you'll be thankfull for the 'daylight' a full size mill gives you
    .

  9. #9
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    <font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by Mcgyver:
    glad you explained - learn something new everyday. imo that is the biggest constraint on a mill. of course everyone's projects are different, but get that MT3 1" drill in an R8 adapter with a big workpiece and you'll be thankfull for the 'daylight' a full size mill gives you</font>
    Well, to cap your semi-sarcasm with an ironic truth...... for a (small) horizontal mill, your example of the 1" drill either MT3 or R8 is "not applicable" so the point is moot in any case.........
    1601 2045 1412 2321

    Keep eye on ball.
    Hashim Khan

  10. #10
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    That's a pretty cool little mill!

    I'd love to stumble across one of them.

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