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Thread: Engraving chisels - how they work (w/pics)

  1. #1
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    Post Engraving chisels - how they work (w/pics)

    Someone expressed an interest in engraving. Here's how it's been done since man personalized the first rock





    If you have any other questions I'd be happy to take a run at them.



    [This message has been edited by Your Old Dog (edited 12-01-2005).]
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    Thank you to our families of soldiers, many of whom have given so much more then the rest of us for the Freedom we enjoy.

    It is true, there is nothing free about freedom, don't be so quick to give it away.

  2. #2
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    Ray,

    Okay, maybe this could be an "online" class.

    First off where can gravers be obtained and what would be a good "starter" set?

    Mike

  3. #3
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    i do believe he is telling you to make your own

    -jacob

  4. #4
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    Ray,
    In the first pic, the second line of text, what word is missing off the end? A tiny ....


  5. #5
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    Mike, Snowman is right. If you have an interest in engraving it just makes sense to make everything but your liners/shaders. You will end up with over 50 chisels for specific needs and it just makes sence to make them as there is next to no effort involved and minimal tools. I use 1/4" round tool steel (S-5 but most any shock use steel will work). I grind them on a regular Sears and Roebuck 6 inch off the shelf grinder. I use no jigs to grind them, it isn't necessary as the angles are not that critical. These angles may be critical in machine use but when handheld you simply change the angle of entry by moving your hand slightly and they start to cut again.

    If you opt to buy them, Brownells used to sell them and I imagine they still do. If you buy them, they come un-sharpened and with no heal and putting that on is the hardest part anyway. I encourage you to try making one. If it takes you more then 5 minutes you're doing something wrong.

    I'm not implying here that anyone is, but, this is not a venture that you can buy your way into. Even the Greivermaster requires you to sharpen and craft most of your on tooliing and all the automation really means is you bang up more guns faster but not one bit better or prettier! I sold my Greivermaster because I made faster time with the hammer. I was engraving full time at the time I sold it. I'm reminded of a saying of an old friend, putting a scapel in your hand don't make you a surgeon but gives you the capacity to send one a lot of business!!

    If anyone wants to waste the money, the basic shape to acquire is a onglette shape. It looks shapped like hands clasped in prayer.

    David. It was supposed to read "tiny heal". This heal, no matter the length has two ends. The end nearest your hand acts as a fulcrum when you want the chisel to surface. So, to surface the chisel as when closing in on a tight scroll or leaving a cut you simply lower the back of the chisel and it glides out if you beating (read lightly tapping)on the other end! Another interesting aspect of the heel, the finish on heal is imparted in the cut. So, if you strope it once or twice on 4/0 jewelers paper you get a brighter looking cut. That's because the tip is being forced thru the metal and it burnishes it's finish as it goes.



    [This message has been edited by Your Old Dog (edited 12-02-2005).]
    - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
    Thank you to our families of soldiers, many of whom have given so much more then the rest of us for the Freedom we enjoy.

    It is true, there is nothing free about freedom, don't be so quick to give it away.

  6. #6

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    OK........does anyone besides Ray follow what's being said here.....Or am I just too dense??

    Maybe I'll try reading it again after I've had my morning coffee.....

    Sorry if this sounds degrading Ray.....It isn't meant to. I think that I need to read up on engraving to understand the terminology a little better. Then I might follow it better.

    I'm interested, but a little lost right now.......

    Best regards........LP

  7. #7
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    I think I have a handle on what is being said -
    Understanding how it is done and being proficient at it are entirely two different things. I can easily understand the mechanics on how to throw a perfect spiraling touch down pass - but doing it is something altogether different.

    This is a pretty good page about hand engraving too.

    http://www.ganoksin.com/borisat/nena...ving-10-41.htm

  8. #8
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    I have done some hand engraving in the past. The main tools used were the gravers and an jewelers block. With the work held in the block and a light pushing pressure on the graver rotate the block and follow the pattern drawn on the work. Most of my work was done in gold, silver, brass and aluminum. There are more shapes of the graver points than shown in illistrations but what Ray shows is a good start.

    If you want to try hand engraving get a jewelers block and a couple of gravers and your hand using copper. You can learn some of the do's and don't quickly. One of the big don't is not to stick the graver in finger or hand when it slips. The cuts are shallow and banking of the graver when you make the turns give the appearance of depth. It takes a long time and lots of practice to get good with engraving. Some of the best hand engravers are in New Orleans.

    Joe

  9. #9

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    Thanks Yaker......

    There's alot of information there......will take a while to "digest" it.

    Best regards.......LP

  10. #10
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    Old Dog, great to see info on an intersting workshop subject I for one know nothing about! please take it to the next level, some pics on technique and of the differences in various gravers, is it laid out or done free hand, best materials to use/learn, pics to some of your work, how do you use these; tap tap tap or hand pressure like a scraper (i'd guess steel is with a hammer, but other gravers in the above link have wooden handles), ....etc

    thanks
    .

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