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Thread: Anyone own a Grizzly G0516 lathe/mill or G4002 lathe?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    9

    Question Anyone own a Grizzly G0516 lathe/mill or G4002 lathe?

    I'm in the market for a lathe right now. This is for home use. It is a solution looking for a problem at this point (I love tools and will always find some way to use them). I do auto restorations and expect to cut everything from plastic to stainless. I spent enough on knobs, trim, and pulleys for the last car I did to pay for a lathe.

    I'm very cramped for space so my choices for a lathe are limited. A 12x36 just won't fit without getting rid of other very useful tools. Also, I would consider a used American or European tool. The catch is that I won't buy a used lathe sight unseen, and I live in the middle of nowhere (Northern New Mexico). I'm probably looking at at least a 400-500 mile drive to even look at something. Because of this, I'm looking at a new imported lathe.

    I've read a number of online reviews for small lathes, and the Grizzly G0516 (10x21) and G4002 (12x24) seem to be liked much better than the other small machines. I know that other companies also import these same machines under different brands and model numbers.

    Does anyone here have experience with either of these machines?
    What did you think of the machine?
    What were its limitations?
    How precise was it?
    Did you ever try to cut stainless?
    What problems did the machine have?
    Was the mill on the G5016 worth anything?
    Would you suggest looking at any other brands/models?
    Any other advice?

    Given my space constraints, I'm willing to have the occasional large part made for me at a local machine shop. I'm also willing to convert the G0516 to DC so that I can cut threads at slow speed.

    I'll also have to make a mobile base for the lathe so that I can get it out of the way when necessary. The 500lb G5016 should be no problem. The G4002 weighs 1000lbs. Any advice for building a mobile base able to take this much weight?

    Thanks for the help.
    Chip

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Sioux Falls, SD
    Posts
    63

    Post

    Hi Chip,

    I got the G0516 last summer. I've been happy with it for the most part. The mill is the weakest part of the setup, but I believe it is the same as the G8689, except it is bolted to the lathe instead of a table. I have broken the (plastic) gears in the mill twice. I cannot say that this was entirely the machine's fault. Both times involved a poorly clamped piece and a fly-cutter, so I consider it part of my education . Grizzly was good about sending replacements. The downside is that I was forced to take the mill-head apart and replace one of the gears.

    The main reason that I chose the 0516 is that unlike (most of) the other 3-in-1s, the mill can be removed and attached to a separate mill table for about $150. So, if I get tired of converting from mill to lathe and back, I can just separate the two. On the other hand, you can use the lathe for a quick-hack power feed when it is attached.

    Another reason that I picked the 0516 is that I thought it was about as big a machine as I could comfortably get into the basement shop. Taking everything I could off the lathe, it was probably somewhere in the 300ish lbs.

    The main limitations I see are the mill (as noted above) and the lack of information on the net. I've spent a lot of time googling around for tips, advice, modifications, etc for this machine, and compared to the 9x20s there just isn't as much. With a little creativity and imagination, a lot of the 9x20 stuff can be applied to the 0516, but most of the modifications or enhancements need to be altered somewhat.

    As far as precision/accuracy. The 3-jaw in the lathe had about 0.003" of runout, which I think is about average for this class of machine/chuck. The bigger problem was the mill, which was about 0.006" out of tram. At first, I thought no-problem, just adjust the mill-column to take that out... except I could never get it right on. Finally, when I had to replace one of the mill-gears, I discovered that there were 4-bolts that held the two halves of the head together; and this was the source of the error. After I adjusted that, it was less than 0.001. I also had to shim and adjust the mill-vice a little. This might just be normal operating procedure to those with more experience that I.

    I have only once tried to cut stainless (on the lathe), and I honestly don't have enough experience to tell if it cut well or not.

    The Grizzly G0516 is made by Sieg. The Sieg M2 and the houseoftools.com "Force 10x22" are the same machine, as far as I can tell. Grizzly doesn't carry all (or any) of the accessories (like steady-rest and follow rest), but they are available from littlemachineshop.com and houseoftools.com. There is a yahoo group on the Sieg M2 and Griz 0516, but there really isn't much more than idle chat there.


    -Eric

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2001
    Location
    Maine
    Posts
    6,674

    Post

    Notice that there is "stainless" and "stainless." Unless you specify the alloy you want to cut, the discussion is fairly meaningless. 303, for example, machines pretty well. Some other stainless alloys can be dern near impossible, no matter what machinery you have. If you choose machineable stainless alloys, you shouldn't have any particular problem.

    ----------
    Try to make a living, not a killing. -- Utah Phillips
    Don't believe everything you know. -- Bumper sticker
    Everybody is ignorant, only on different subjects. -- Will Rogers
    Law of Logical Argument - Anything is possible if you don't know what you are talking about.
    If at first you don't succeed, try, try, again. Then give up. There's no point in being a damn fool about it. -- W.C. Fields

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Sioux Falls, SD
    Posts
    63

    Post

    The stainless that I used was either 303, 304 or 316, I think it was 303. I do remember it was pretty soft.

    -Eric

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Posts
    202

    Post

    With the 12x36 (G4003) only being 8" wider (with stand measurement) and only $100 more I would make some room...somehow. Got a sawzall?

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Posts
    202

    Post

    As for a mobile base, I have always been pretty fond of J. Kelly McCoys solution. He easily as over 1000 Lbs sitting on it.

    http://www.wcc.net/~jkmccoy/shop/shop.htm

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Keystone State
    Posts
    1,124

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    chipkent

    I have a G0516 that rescued from a Griz "trash and burnpile sale" upstate from me (day trip). Did not have the mill, or most of the normally include extra goodies.
    Griz has pretty good after sale support, if that is a concern (same machine, different importers, different support, probibly pay for the difference).

    The Mills gears are a known "weakness", plenty of info on the web of belt drive conversions. Order a spare early to min the down time. Griz uses a MT#3 taper to interchange with the lathe spindle taper. There are R8 versions out there, and conversions to rebuild both ways.

    Many Griz machines have down loadable manuals that tell more than print catalog and web sight. I used that to narrow down my choices, the G0516 had a few features that don't show up again until the machines get much larger. Other than changing gears(not hard) I am happy with it (do miss my ol'merican cast iron )

    Buy for the lathe, and think of the mill as a little extra sugar. I have seen several people that bought a base et al from the above suppliers, and never married the mill and lathe.

    Hope that helps

    ------------------
    Today I will gladly share my experience and advice, for there no sweeter words than "I told you so."
    Today I will gladly share my experience and advice, for there no sweeter words than "I told you so."

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Mount Clemens, Mi
    Posts
    2,546

    Post

    Here is another outfit with 3 in 1's They have a great web site.
    http://www.smithy.com/
    They have been at the NAMES show every year and I keep thinking that one of these might do the job with the space/ cost deal. they seem to be well made.

    ------------------
    Glen
    Been there, probally broke it doing that
    Glen
    Been there, probably broke it, doing that!
    I am not a lawyer, and never played one on TV!
    All the usual and standard disclaimers apply. Do not try this at home, use only as directed, No warranties express or implied, for the intended use or the suggested uses, Wear safety glasses, closed course, professionals only

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    9

    Post

    I initially looked at the Smithy machines, but I found a good number of owners that really disliked them for one reason or another. They especially did not like the milling head attached to the lathe head.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Oregon Coast
    Posts
    985

    Post

    Hi Chip, I have had a Grizzly G0516 for about 18 months now and have been real pleased with it. Not having any experience at all with machine work and having only watched a old friend of mine many years ago who was a machinist, I chose the 5016 over the others because of all the extra tooling that came with it. I was Very limited in space to put it and also limited in the amount of money I was able to spend for a machine.

    I have to fully agree with Eric on his assessment of the 0516 except his statement that “On the other hand, you can use the lathe for a quick-hack power feed when it is attached.” My machine has a switch that selects either “Lath or Mill” not allowing both to operated at the same time.

    I have made a few improvements to the machine that I found articles about on the web. Steve Bedair has a great web site with some very useful projects.
    If I had more room and money, I would defiantly have a larger separate milling machine. But if your not in a big hurry and don’t push it too much the 0516”s mill will get the job done. After all it’s just a toy for one of my hobbies and strictly for my own enjoyment.

    The guys on this BBS are great to learn from and if you lurk around here long enough you will find the answer to about every thing you ever wanted to know about machine work and some you didn’t want to know
    Buy the machine, I don’t think you’ll be sorry. Life is too short to dally too long.
    Mel
    _____________________________________________
    Mel Larsen
    Remember when your cup holder sat next to you and wore a poodle skirt?

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