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Thread: Window in new shop

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Denmark
    Posts
    134

    Post Window in new shop

    Hi All

    Very soon I will be starting to build a new home workshop.

    The shop I have now, have one window place right in front of my workbench

    Now I would like to ask all of you, if the best placing of a window is in front of the workbench, or if it is better to have the window on one side of the workbench

    Here in Denmark the sun is low on the horizon right now, and I found the direct light is a problem

    ------------------
    Mogens Kilde
    www.wallenderengineering.com

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Posts
    6

    Post

    Put the window in front of the workbench and install blinds. The blinds will disfuse the direct sunlight.


  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Denmark
    Posts
    134

    Post

    Sorry if I seems to pressing your all !, but it looks like my topics landed near the stonage, and I sure would like more input on my topic befor i start to build my new workshop

    hope my own reply will put the topic in present age again


    ------------------
    Mogens Kilde
    www.wallenderengineering.com

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2001
    Location
    Maine
    Posts
    6,730

    Post

    Your personal preference, I think. I'd probably have the windows to one side, so I could have shelves and other storage along the back of the workbench.
    ----------
    Try to make a living, not a killing. -- Utah Phillips
    Don't believe everything you know. -- Bumper sticker
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    There are lots of people who mistake their imagination for their memory. - Josh Billings
    Law of Logical Argument - Anything is possible if you don't know what you are talking about.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Virginia, DC suburbs
    Posts
    1,706

    Post

    I'd have to agree with SGW - I like having shelves on the back wall to the workbench.

    I have a window at one end of my shop, and a couple in my home office. I find it easier to concentrate with the shades drawn - I get distracted too easily by action visible out the window. I open the shade (for light) sometimes when I work with my back to the window.

    Maybe I was a cat in a previous life?

    Science. If you don't understand it, don't talk to me about how it's going to end the world.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Posts
    1,494

    Post

    I would go with skylites for natural lite, at many as you can put in there. The fewer windows in the walls the fewer people can peek in and see your shiney metal goodies. If that is not a concern they go at it as your wish.
    James Kilroy

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Posts
    279

    Post

    The biggest problem is when the bright sunlight shines directly on your project or machine... but only on part of it. You can't see what you are doing. I moved my machines to the windowless part of the shop just because of this. I put up lights that give an even source of light.

    Having a wall behind the bench is nice for pegboard, but even nicer is a 6" shelf placed about a foot above the bench working surface to put your hand tools on while you are working. It keeps them out of the way of the project and they are easy to find and grab when you need them.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    162

    Post

    Mogens
    How is your shop going to be located? How is it laid out inside? Where is the proposed window? I have windows on the east, south, and north sides of my shop and I am very happy with the layout. I have a grinder and a press in front of the south windows, a drawing board below the east window, and my lathe sits directly under the north window. The diffused natural light of the north window is great for the lathe. I rarely use the drawing table early in the morning because of my shop schedule so the direct sun hasn't been an issue. My property is way out in the countryside, so I don't have blinds and probably never will.
    Cam
    Editted P.S. Because I live on a rural property, traffic outside the windows is rarely a problem.




    [This message has been edited by cam m (edited 03-07-2006).]

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    SW Montana, USA
    Posts
    45

    Post

    m_kilde,
    I am a firm believer in natural light. Any shop I design has a maximum of light I can allow in as modified by other needs in the shop. That said 'direct' sunlight, in your eyes from an angle or reflecting off your work is cause of significant strain and work shadows interfering with what you perceive especially finish work. In your current shop hang a thin or sheer sheet of fabric to diffuse the direct rays. A good compromise might be a narrow horizontal window higher up the wall and a bright reflective surface to diffuse the light. Another idea might be placing a tall narrow window to one or both sides of the work area or between machines and again a diffuser/reflector surface to even the light.
    Skylights are an option but have concerns with weather covering them leaking etc. or depending on sun angle, heat and direct sun concerns. Have you considered a 'saw tooth' design with a row of south exposure windows along the ridgeline? At higher latitudes Southern exposure maximizes heat and light gain in cold seasons and minimizes heat gain in summer, etc... Don't forget too... more electrical outlets than you need, still won't be enough.
    Give a shout if this or other ideas may help.
    Will A.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    1,016

    Post

    I put one in the middle of the workbench. I mounted the vise in the middle of the workbench. Workbench is 20 feet long. Visibility is great. But when grinding or when things "fly" out of the vise its directly into the window. I put a piece of plexiglass infront of the window.

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