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Thread: Mill/Drill

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Posts
    5

    Question Mill/Drill

    I am planning to buy a Mill/Drill with power feeds and have shopped the catalogs, which would be the best but, Rong Fu, Jet, or Grizzly. I will be using machine mostly for cast aluminum but may use on steel or alloys.
    I would appreciate information from anyone who has either of these machines.

  2. #2
    Ron LaDow Guest

    Post

    C60,
    I looked at 'em for a long time, finally bought the knee mill that most suppliers offer for not a whole lot more.
    One thing that was obvious is that there isn't a lot of room twixt the head and the table on the D/Ms; by the time there's a chuck and a vice in there, I'm not sure there's room left for a drill.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Posts
    467

    Post

    I have a Jet mill/drill. Of those mentioned, the Jet was the most "ready to go right out of the box" of them all. Didn't need any tweaking or cleaning or adjusting. However, If I had to do it again, I'd go for the knee machine, probably by Jet, definitely a floor model. But, I got a good deal on the mill/drill, so.................

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2001
    Location
    Maine
    Posts
    6,730

    Post

    I'd go with the Jet, myself.

    I also agree with the other replies; if you can possibly manage it, get the small Jet knee mill (JTM-830 or JVM-836). You'll be happier in the long run, and amotized over 20 years or more, the extra cost really isn't that much.
    ----------
    Try to make a living, not a killing. -- Utah Phillips
    Don't believe everything you know. -- Bumper sticker
    Everybody is ignorant, only on different subjects. -- Will Rogers
    There are lots of people who mistake their imagination for their memory. - Josh Billings
    Law of Logical Argument - Anything is possible if you don't know what you are talking about.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Posts
    5

    Post

    <font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by SGW:
    I'd go with the Jet, myself.

    I also agree with the other replies; if you can possibly manage it, get the small Jet knee mill (JTM-830 or JVM-836). You'll be happier in the long run, and amotized over 20 years or more, the extra cost really isn't that much.
    </font>
    Thanks for the reply, I will definately go with the knee model, That is why I wanted imput from others who have mills. Thanks again,

    Curtis

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Posts
    5

    Talking

    <font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by Ron LaDow:
    C60,
    I looked at 'em for a long time, finally bought the knee mill that most suppliers offer for not a whole lot more.
    One thing that was obvious is that there isn't a lot of room twixt the head and the table on the D/Ms; by the time there's a chuck and a vice in there, I'm not sure there's room left for a drill.
    </font>
    I appreciate the reply, I was indoubt as to whether I should get a knee model and due to the replies I will go get the knee mode.
    Thanks again for your imput.

    Curtis


  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Posts
    5

    Talking

    <font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by SGW:
    I'd go with the Jet, myself.

    I also agree with the other replies; if you can possibly manage it, get the small Jet knee mill (JTM-830 or JVM-836). You'll be happier in the long run, and amotized over 20 years or more, the extra cost really isn't that much.
    </font>

    Thanks for your input, I am definately going with the Jet knee model.

    Thanks again,

    Curtis

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2001
    Location
    Maine
    Posts
    6,730

    Smile

    Of course, it would be *really* nice to get something bigger.... ;-) It seems as though no matter how big the table is, a job comes along when it's not *quite* big enough, and you might be able to find a "good used" larger machine for about the same money. But for normal sorts of model/home work, I think either of the small Jet knee mills ought to make you happy.

    I strongly urge you to look at both machines, in person, if you possibly can, before you actually buy one. The descriptions are okay, up to a point, but there's nothing like actually seeing something.
    ----------
    Try to make a living, not a killing. -- Utah Phillips
    Don't believe everything you know. -- Bumper sticker
    Everybody is ignorant, only on different subjects. -- Will Rogers
    There are lots of people who mistake their imagination for their memory. - Josh Billings
    Law of Logical Argument - Anything is possible if you don't know what you are talking about.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Posts
    5

    Talking

    <font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by SGW:
    Of course, it would be *really* nice to get something bigger.... ;-) It seems as though no matter how big the table is, a job comes along when it's not *quite* big enough, and you might be able to find a "good used" larger machine for about the same money. But for normal sorts of model/home work, I think either of the small Jet knee mills ought to make you happy.

    I strongly urge you to look at both machines, in person, if you possibly can, before you actually buy one. The descriptions are okay, up to a point, but there's nothing like actually seeing something.
    </font>
    I agree, I am going to look before I buy, When I bought my lathe I didn't look at it before buying and wish I had. I bought the Grizzly G4007, Have had a few problems with it, like bolts stripping threads, they are just too soft, I replaced them with 10.5 grade (Metric)

    Thanks, for the input.

    Curtis


  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Posts
    11

    Post

    Aside from the physical size difference, what does a knee mill have to offer over the mill / drill machines?

    PMB
    http://benchmark.20m.com

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