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Thread: I need a new lathe what one

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    simpsonville s c
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    247

    Post I need a new lathe what one

    I have $4500.00 too spend on it and what one should I get. I like the enco 13gp for $3500.00 his mouth on sale. it is 3 phase 16 speed. So what should I buy Brett

  2. #2

    Smile

    Brett
    Ultimately you have to live with yourself, and you should do what you feel is best for yourself. I would look for a older machine in good condition. Patience and cash gets you some great deals - if keep an eye open and stay sharp (inspect any machine you want to buy completely and run ir if possble).

    Good hunting

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Western Australia
    Posts
    182

    Post

    Hi Brett

    As the other reply mentioned "an older machine in good condition" is probably a wise choice.

    Consider also (as I found out) that accessories that do not come with the lathe, that you may need/want will cost a substantial amount.

    A good "older" machine may come with such accessories, and if not, you should have some $$'s left for the extras.

    A potential plus is that some of the "older" equipment is build to an engineering standard, NOT a price level.

    My 53 year old lathe (recently purchased) the mandrel is only half a thou' out, and the bed ways have only lost/worn about 8 thou. Turns 6" over the cross slide, and could squeeze in 14" x 4" in the gap. It came with 2x 3 jaw s/c and 1x 4 jaw ind chucks, fixed/travelling steadies, 12" facplate, turret toolpost, a substantial amount of tooling including carbide tipped tool holders, carbide tipped boring bar, slot drills end mills and large diameter taper shank drills. All up approx US$175!

    (BTW, this is in Western Australia)

    HTH

    Regards

    Peter
    <font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by Brett Hurt:
    I have $4500.00 too spend on it and what one should I get. I like the enco 13gp for $3500.00 his mouth on sale. it is 3 phase 16 speed. So what should I buy Brett</font>
    Kind regards

    Peter

  4. #4

    Wink

    Peter
    You got a great deal for very little - and you could still afford to rebuild it to as new and have a superior machine. Here is a site that can assist in that process when you decide to do it ( www.moglice.com ) with low friction materials for way rebuilding and half nut salvaging.

    Pass the Fosters - Cheers!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
    Location
    Toledo, Ohio
    Posts
    9,924

    Post

    I agree with the older US made machine. It takes a while to find, but is worth the effort.
    Imports can be of spotty quality. Some people have had good luck with them, others not. Enco is on a par with Grizzly and Jet in my opinion. They usually come with an assortment of accessories, check that they have steady rest & follow rest, what chucks they provide as well as toolpost.
    $3500 for the lathe would leave around $1000 for accessories. If the lathe is not equipped as above, this will go pretty quickly. If not you could end up in pretty good shape.
    You mentioned it was three phase. Do you have three phase available? If not count on $200 - $500+ for phase converter or VFD, which is best option.
    Jim H.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    North Central Texas
    Posts
    2,240

    Post

    I say go for the Asian machine. I have had great luck with mine, and you get a NEW machine with many accessories. I was able to buy a nice lathe, a small mill, and a fair amount of tooling for the same amount I almost spent on a nice old Southbend with few accessories.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Western Australia
    Posts
    182

    Post

    Hi Thrud

    <font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by Thrud:
    Peter
    You got a great deal for very little - and you could still afford to rebuild it to as new and have a superior machine. Here is a site that can assist in that process when you decide to do it ( www.moglice.com ) with low friction materials for way rebuilding and half nut salvaging.

    Pass the Fosters - Cheers!
    </font>
    Yes, I am happy with the purchase. I discovered though that it would cost me $1750 to have the bed and saddle reground. This is hard to justify when the rest of the machine is of course 53 years old, and a new Asian lathe is about $3000-$3500.

    I am intrigued by this "product" from Moglice. Have you used it? How IS it used ?

    Maybe I'll pose this question as another message and see the results of others.



    ------------------
    Kind regards

    Peter
    Kind regards

    Peter

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
    Location
    Toledo, Ohio
    Posts
    9,924

    Post

    Peter, I was intrigued also. Went to web site, and requested information. They sent a packet of information on product. They have several different systems and materials which are basically metallic filled putties of various types depending on application.
    Looks very interesting, and cost effective, compared to price quoted above. They are not a fly by night or snake oil operation by any means.
    Jim H.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    simpsonville s c
    Posts
    247

    Default

    the one I like is this one

    http://www.grizzly.com/products/13-x...with-DRO/G0776

    let me know what you think of it for $$$

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Posts
    29

    Default

    i think your choice depends on how your are going to use your lathe and what opportunities you have. old iron is very heavy and ridged, capable of withstanding heavy cuts. the down side is finding one in good condition. the imports are not in a class with industrial machines. i have owned a 12x36 grizzly for 30 yrs and in that time i have replaced one gear (my fault) and a set of drive belts. i treat it with respect and it has served me well. i have two other friends with grizzlies and they have also held up well. these are not tool room lathes but they can do very accurate work. if i were buying an older machine i would insist on running it before i spent good money on it. industrial equipment is very expensive to repair.and yes don,t forget the cost of moving it and if its three phase you will need to purchase a vfd or rotary phase converter. most of the small and medium size imports are single phase.

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