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Thread: Help with SB 9C requested

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Posts
    12

    Post Help with SB 9C requested

    I'm the proud new owner of a used SB 9C lathe, and I'd like to clean it up before I use it. (It REALLY needs it!!)
    How do I disassemble the compound & cross slides for cleaning? I got the compound off, but it looks like I need to get the ball handle off the threaded shaft to get the slide off the base. The end of the feed screw has what appears to be a screw with a center threaded plug in it. There's no allen socket or other way to unscrew the plug that I can see, do I need to grind out the center of a flat blade screw driver to unscrew the ball handle retainer from off this plug?



  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    52N 122W Western Kanuckistan
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    40,418

    Post

    I'll have a look at mine tonight after work. It's been a long time since I had that apart. Make sure you keep track of the exact location and position of every part that you remove, such a gib screws and strips so that they may be replaced in the same place and orientation.
    Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Origin now settable to bottom left! All values positive. Click Here

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    Des Moines, IA
    Posts
    307

    Post

    There is a hole in the bottom of the part that has the witness mark on it. (I put a pin in the hole, heavy shim stock around the piece, vise grips on the shim stock and against the pin and "whack it" to unscrew. This part unscrews along with the compound screw, that is you have to work both to get them out. Then loosen the set screw that is below that piece and you can lever the compound nut down enough to get the slide off. Hard to describe but easy to do.
    No particular need to remove the ball crank but you are correct on the type of tool needed. It is just a round nut holding the crank on.

    [This message has been edited by John Foster (edited 08-18-2003).]

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2001
    Location
    Maine
    Posts
    6,683

    Post

    I used the shank of a number-size drill of the correct size to go in the hole and then used a brass punch against the shank to loosen the part. John's idea may be more controllable. I think it is important, no matter what you do, to have the pin a good fit in the hole though, so you don't chew up the edges of the hole.

    What you really need, I suppose, is a pin wrench or whatever they're called. (A quarter circle of the correct radius to wrap around the part, with a pin at the end that hooks in the hole.)

    ----------
    Try to make a living, not a killing. -- Utah Phillips
    Don't believe everything you know. -- Bumper sticker
    Everybody is ignorant, only on different subjects. -- Will Rogers
    There are lots of people who mistake their imagination for their memory. - Josh Billings
    Law of Logical Argument - Anything is possible if you don't know what you are talking about.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Posts
    351

    Wink

    You can make a wrench to do this job without much trouble. With a hunk of 3/8 steel plate about 2 by 4," just bore a hole the correct diameter to fit over the screwed-in part, and cross drill and thread for a screw with a turned down section to fit the hole well. A light thunk with a brass hammer and out she comes!
    hms50
    hms

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Posts
    12

    Post

    Many thanks to all who responded, the compound slide is now disassembled and soaking in diesel fuel. It turns out the "plug" I refered to was actually the end of the feed screw. I ground a slot in a large screwdriver to fit over it and unscrewed the retaining nut from it. The ball handle and dial were next to go, with the help of WD-40 and light taps of a hammer. The back half of the dial (the part with the scribed 0) screwed out of the compound slide -it' right hand thread- and then the feed screw could be unscrewed from the brass feed nut. Then the brass feed nut could be withdrawn thru the base of the compound slide and the 2 parts seperated. After I get it cleaned & back together the cross slide will be next..........
    Anybody know how to best clean, lube & adjust the carriage? I don't think I want to tear it completely down.
    Again, thanks guys for the advice.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Posts
    1,204

    Post

    you are way ahead of me , i have nice 9 inch model a sitting in the shop begging to be cleaned up ,painted and put back in service .

    just got the motor backfrom the repair shop after 4 months the repair guy still had not worked out the reversing switch, fired him .
    will get there in the end i suppose .

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2001
    Location
    Maine
    Posts
    6,683

    Post

    The apron will come off, with some care. Then the carriage lifts off.

    To take the apron off the carriage, find and remove 3 (4?) Allen-head capscrews along the top front edge of the carriage that go down into the top of the apron. One of them at least may be covered with a sheetmetal plug down in the counterbore. Support the apron as you do this. Then undo the right-hand support on the leadscrew. Support the leadscrew. Slide the apron off the end of the leadscrew. Doing this is not as bad as it sounds, although you may wish occasionally that you had an extra hand.

    You will undoubtedly find the back of the apron full of chips. Sheetmetal covers over the gears, etc. come off easily to permit cleaning. I would avoid any temptation to disassemble the clutch. I tried and did not accomplish anything useful. If you can't resist, note that the star wheel handle on the front of the apron that controls the clutch is held on with a LEFT-HAND screw.

    There are bolt-on strips under the edges of the ways that hold the carriage down. No trick to taking them off.
    ----------
    Try to make a living, not a killing. -- Utah Phillips
    Don't believe everything you know. -- Bumper sticker
    Everybody is ignorant, only on different subjects. -- Will Rogers
    There are lots of people who mistake their imagination for their memory. - Josh Billings
    Law of Logical Argument - Anything is possible if you don't know what you are talking about.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    52N 122W Western Kanuckistan
    Posts
    40,418

    Post

    No clutch on a model C.
    Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Origin now settable to bottom left! All values positive. Click Here

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Posts
    12

    Post

    If you just want to clean it up, take the cross slide ect. apart like the first couple of guys said ie:, just unscrew the back collar and take the lead screw out. The zeroing collars are stuck with rust on this one, so I went all the way.
    I see how the carriage & apron seperate, it's big countersunk screws in this model. Plus the underside clamp. Is that for locking the carriage? Thanks for the specifics on getting it off of the lead screw though, knowing how will save some choice words that I may need further down the road.
    My brother got this lathe out of a house he bought, he disconnected the reversing switch too. But he drew a wiring diagram first, which then got lost between his house & mine. I have the discussions on wiring them from this board printed out, I'll be giving them a try soon.

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