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Thread: OT - Woodburner Installation

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    14

    Question OT - Woodburner Installation

    I hope to get a woodburner installed in my secondary tractor shed / workshop before the snow flies this year! The shed is a pole barn with a typical truss roof support system and asphalt shingles. Ceiling is a random mixture of drywall and plywood. Does anyone know how the smokepipe should be installed where it penetrates the ceiling at the bottom of the trusses? What is used to protect the ceiling from the heat of the pipe? Thanks - and next time I'll try to keep more to the machinist topics!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Taftville CT
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    741

    Post

    I would reccommend that you consult your local building official and/or building codes if they exist. Though it is "only" a shed/workshop, they should point you in the right direction for a safe, legal installation. Better safe and legal than unsure and illegal. Should something happen........?
    Paying Attention Is Not That Expensive.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2001
    Location
    Maine
    Posts
    6,714

    Post

    I suspect you need double-wall insulated pipe for everything starting below the ceiling all the way up through the roof...but I think ERBenoit's right to suggest you consult somebody closer to the scene of the action to be sure.

    ----------
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    Don't believe everything you know. -- Bumper sticker
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    Law of Logical Argument - Anything is possible if you don't know what you are talking about.

  4. #4

    Post

    Being from Texas and on a hunting trip to Wyoming. My friend's Dad had a heat exchanger in the stove pipe. In made stove more effective and he said that the pipe was cooler, still used double pipe. He could run it on used oil also.
    Bob Scott

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    6

    Post

    There is a sheet metal plate that the stove pipe goes through. The hole through the ceiling is large enough to keep the pipe away from any combustables. The plate then fills the gap. A box should be built above the hole to keep any insulation away from the pipe too. Through the roof the same applies for clearance. A flashing is available for the roof pitch to bring the pipe through. A collar then goes over the pipe to cover the gap betwwen the pipe and flashing.
    Get a contractor to install it or your insurance may not cover you.
    Greg

  6. #6
    IOWOLF Guest

    Post

    I BUILT ONE LAST YEAR, A WATER PREASURE TANK WITH A 55 GAL. DRUM AROUND IT.
    I BLOW AIR FROM INSIDE THE SHOP THROUGH THE DRUM AND BACK INTO THE SHOP AT 150 TO 200 DEGREES. EMAIL ME FOR PICS.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Location
    northern Minnesota
    Posts
    277

    Post

    You'll need a class A triple wall chimney..metalbestos in one brand. http://www.dukefire.com/metalbestos.htm

    I have used metalbestos chimenys a few times but I like flue lined masonary block alot better.. safer and maybe even less expensive. I haven't priced block and flue in awhile but metalbestos prices have increase 3X since I last bought some.

    Don't forget to clean out whatever chimney you end up with.. a chimney fire is no fun!!

  8. #8

    Post

    I second dhammer's advice about pricing a masonary chimney. Back in 1981, I put a coal/wood stove in my house. I had a mason build a chimney to code, permits and all for fire insurance reasons, for close to the price of the metalbestos stuff. It's worth checking into.
    Bob

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Independent principality of Sinquefieldia (formerly Missouri)
    Posts
    17,134

    Post

    What I am hearing around here is that masonry chimneys are not accepted anymore, and that they all have to be lined with a metal pipe now.

    We have a tile liner, and won't have to do anything yet, but I am told that if we sell, that may have to be lined, or made unusable.

    My father (in MN, not MO) had to have his lined, just to replace the gas furnace.

    Anyone else know about that?

    BTW, I also understand that the metal pipe only lasts a few years......typical, if true.
    2025 1680 1525 1501 0201 1501 2002 1101 0131 0128 1499 0601 0127 0602 1901 1501 25452514 1055 1909

    Keep eye on ball.
    Hashim Khan

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Lansing, Mi, USA area
    Posts
    73

    Post

    I had a metal double wall pipe installed 2 years ago. Was advised by friend in heat/cool business it was bset bet for the money.

    Pipe is stainless steel, should last?

    Russ

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