Results 1 to 6 of 6

Thread: Rose Reamer, Relieving attachments.

  1. #1

    Post Rose Reamer, Relieving attachments.

    (1) Older machining books talk about Rose reamers, and making one is often a shop project, which appears simple to do. I have never however seen these specifically listed in tool catalogs. (My belief is that the Rose cut on the end and was a "roughing" reamer.) Has this configuration been absorbed into a more modern design? How do hand, machine, roughing and finishing reamers differ?

    I have actually used, or needed reamers only sparingly for dowel or taper pins. Most of the time I drill bolt or thread holes, or on larger diameters for close fits, use a boring bar. I see sets of reamers on Ebay and in catalogs, have been reluctant to tie up money in something that most likely would collect rust. I generally buy something when I have an immediate use. Being able to make a reamer in an hour or so would (a) be ego enhancing and (b) could actually be cost effective.

    (2)Older books including the South bend lathe book reference a "relieving attachment for a lathe. What did this thing actually do, and how was it made? My understanding is that relief referred to the clearance or taper behind the cutting edge of a reamer or hob or milling cutter. There must have been a cam/gear arrangement to move the cross-slide forward and back as the spindle rotated.

    One of my current (anticipated) projects is to add a shaft encoder to the spindle of the lathe and a stepping motor to the cross-feed to make a simple taper attachment. It appears that grinding relief could also be easily implemented.

    Bob

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    On the Oil Coast,USA
    Posts
    16,858

    Post

    Check out the machine tool archieve web site look at the listings for Hendey lathes they list a releiving attachment and have some really good photos.I have a 14*54 Hendey gear head and thought about building one.They seem simple to construct basicly it is a set of aux.change gears that are timed to the spindle.these drive a telescoping driveshaft and are selectable to corespond to the number of desired flutes.The driveshaft connects to a special top slide that has a in and out movement of about .020" that is driven by a cam which is driven thru the driveshaft by means of the gear changes.I think it could be set up easily with a change gear set from an old lathe as you would only need 2,3,4,6,8,10,12 flutes and since it operates below 300 rpm it could be driven directly from the headstock spindle gear with only a single intermediate idler gear.If you decide to build one feel free to e-mail me as I have access to a few parts and am thinking of converting an old Seneca Falls lathe to that paticular use.It could also be possible to convert a standard topslide to the cam function.This could be an interesting project for HSM.
    I just need one more tool,just one!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Posts
    400

    Post

    Monarch toolrom lathes had a relieving attachment. Monarch Co. may have data sheets. Our department had Monarchs with relieving attach. and found that they can cause a rather peculiar problem. The repetitive in and out motion has a rather hypnotic, dizzying effect on the operator. One of the night shift fellows performing a lengthy relieving operation found himself on the verge of losing his balance and almost fell into the turning operation.

    From that time on all lengthy relieving jobs performed on swing or graveyard shifts were performed by a two-man crew.
    O

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    On the Oil Coast,USA
    Posts
    16,858

    Post

    Ya you do need something to cover the slide rest a die filer I find will cause me to have the same problem if its late at night.
    I just need one more tool,just one!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Posts
    214

    Post

    a d bit (1/2 reamer ) works great w/w/out a pilot .....if uwant a fluted one .mach.reamers cut on end ,u can file those in quicker than settting up as well as axial ones(rose flutes had NO relief on axial flutes....have made several sets of counter bores ,special milling cutters,tapered reamers (rifle chambers) ,fluted & backed off w/ toolpost grndr ,stoned & not stoned for final eccentric ( which may be better , but not necessary)........cutters (4 flute can be backed off by offsetting in 4 jaw chuck ,john stevenson methood ,so simple & it drove me crazy for years thinking how it could be done,)....but if u just like to make attachments (& I DO ) have at it & post the drwngs /pics pls) , so i can make one........easiest i have seen is mounting a cam blank ,follower & spring loaded ,disconnected x/feed screwto follow the cam( REALLY lo speed .....those old hendys went down to under 10)

    best wishes
    docn8as
    docn8as

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Cheyenne Wyo
    Posts
    643

    Post

    Lautard gives a good look at D and toolmakers' reamers in his first Machinist's Bedside Reader. Basically, grind about 49% of the diameter away, radius the leading edge a bit, and give about 5* relief to the nose and radius the trailing edge. Then harden and leave it that way. Unless you drop things, then draw it back to straw color. Stone the edge clean, on the flat, easy to see progress after hardening. Not too high tech, but any size hole you need ON SIZE. Can't guarantee that with a drill! There are a few sizes worth buying, but it's usually quicker to make the others as you need them. Brownell's sells an assortment of drill rod that's very handy to have around for these chores.
    I'm here hoping to advancify my smartitude.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •