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Thread: Banjo chuck wrench (pics)

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2001
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    LA, CA, USA
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    640

    Default Banjo chuck wrench (pics)

    When I bought my lathe, the (screw-on) chuck must have been mounted by a Chinese strongman. I didn't know of Kroil at the time and didn't relish beating on the chuck wrench with a hammer or using the block of wood on the ways trick so I made a banjo wrench to fit the jaws.



    It's nothing more than 3/4" plywood with slots cut out to fit over the chuck jaws but it produces an enormous amount of controlled (and impact free) torque to loosen the chuck after a crash or a long bout of interrupted turning.

    Here's a picture of it applied to the chuck.

    Last edited by mklotz; 04-14-2013 at 07:01 PM.
    Regards, Marv

    Home Shop Freeware - Tools for People Who Build Things
    http://www.myvirtualnetwork.com/mklotz

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
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    Chicago Area
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    Now yer just showin' off!

    That's pretty cool, though.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
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    Like the wrench, hate threaded spindles.

    Best,

    BW

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
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    Elizabethtown PA
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    Default

    Cool idea. My old lathe had a threaded spindle. What I did was use my big adjustable wrench by closing it on a jaw and give it a tap with my hand and off it came, the chuck that is, not my hand silly
    Life Is Grand

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2001
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    LA, CA, USA
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    Quote Originally Posted by cybor462
    Cool idea. My old lathe had a threaded spindle. What I did was use my big adjustable wrench by closing it on a jaw and give it a tap with my hand and off it came, the chuck that is, not my hand silly
    The problem with that approach is that it puts all the stress on one jaw. Not a problem if the chuck isn't screwed down tightly but mine was on tighter than a .... The banjo wrench distributes the force over all the jaws rather than concentrating it on just one.
    Regards, Marv

    Home Shop Freeware - Tools for People Who Build Things
    http://www.myvirtualnetwork.com/mklotz

  6. #6
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    Dec 2004
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    Who's gonna be the first to say it?

  7. #7
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    Jul 2005
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    Bloomington, IN
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    Say what

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
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    Western New York U.$.A
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fasttrack
    Say what
    That it's not likely you can exert equal pressure on three jaws if the squares are hand cut. You will likely only get the inside of one and the outside of the other and the third one goes along for the ride. If all three jaws are to take force than it would require some real precision work. If any one of the slots is too narrow it's doing all the work the same as a crescent wrench would be on one jaw. I'm not being an overly critical thinker here but I know this crowd has many who are.

    ..........................does that mean I'm slowly being converted?

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
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    Palo Alto, California
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    Don't forget the flexibility of wood. Unlike a steel wrench, the wood one might well allow the jaw that touches first to moosh into it so the next one can take some load, and so on as the force is applied. The more often the wrench is used, the more likely the jaws are to even out. . .

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Antwerp, Belgium
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    94

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    Hexagonal stock in the chuck... and a spanner with a long handle...

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