Page 1 of 5 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 44

Thread: Workbench dilemma (new shop)

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Central IL.
    Posts
    838

    Default Workbench dilemma (new shop)

    So I have finally moved into a new place, and my shop has effectively doubled in size. Sadly during the move I had to leave my old built-in (a costly mistake) work bench behind. In the future I would like to avoid the costly mistake of building a built-in bench.

    Thus I have been shopping for a bolt together bench that I can take with me something around 72w x 24d x 42h. I have seen several that I like, but they are ridiculously priced in my opinion, and not high enough. They want $450 for this sears model.



    I donít have any welding equipment, or tools to cut steel tubing to length (except a hacksaw). But I think if I could get the parts cut to length I could figure out a way to hold them all together without welding. A buddy of mine says you can use a fiber reinforced disk in a miter saw to cut tubing. Anyone ever tried this?

    Should I try the home grown bench or just break down and buy one (actually I need 2)?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Utah
    Posts
    1,961

    Default

    Dan,

    Maybe it's time you invest in a welder...

    You can get a 225 Amp Lincoln, Miller, or other AC stick welder for very little and it will do the job just fine. As for cutting the tube...a hacksaw will do that too. Sure a bandsaw would be easier but if you don't have one...

    And Yes, if you don't want to get the welder, bolting it together will be just fine too. Even if you do weld it, some of it should be bolted anyway - for portability sake. You don't want to leave these behind like you had to do with your old ones!

    If you still want to buy one don't just look at Sears... There are many much nicer work benches out there - try farm suppliers in your area. They usually sell some heavy duty ones, at least they do in my area.

    Last edited by Mike Burdick; 07-03-2007 at 03:50 PM.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Vancouver's Island
    Posts
    41,979

    Default

    Here is what I did recently. I used one Gorilla rack kit of 48" x 16" shelves and turned it into a workbench. No modification of the Gorilla rack is required and all parts are bolted together. It has a top of 3/4" plywood covered in 1/8 sheet steel. You can have the steel cut to size when you buy it. The supports around the top are 1" x 1" angle iron and can be cut to size with a hacksaw and drilled with a hand drill. I bolted down the top to the plywood and the angle iron using flush socket head cap screws. I left the plywood very slightly oversize and then sanded it down to match the edge of the steel after assembly.

    I forgot to mention that total cost was maybe $250 to $300.



    Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Oroville, WA
    Posts
    12,029

    Default

    I bought one of these: http://www.grizzly.com/products/H2612 and then went to the lumber yard and bought a heavy duty solid core door to put on top. My time to assemble was next to zero, and all parts were off the shelf and rugged. No way I'd ever build another bench. The last scratch built bench was made with 4x6 cedar for the top and 2x4 and 4x4 for the base. Weighs a ton. The top is flat and perfect for gluing and clamping, though.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Illinois
    Posts
    435

    Default

    The Sam's Club by me (Hodgkins, Il.) has one that looks identical to the one in your picture for $200.00. It looks to be powder coated with the wooden top?
    "The men the American people admire most extravagantly are the greatest liars; the men they detest most violently are those who try to tell them the truth." H. L. Mencken

    "All truth passes through three stages. First, it is ridiculed, second it is violently opposed, and third, it is accepted as self-evident."

    "When fear rules, reason and logic are ruled out."

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Suffolk, England
    Posts
    1,306

    Default

    Why not build one from extruded aluminium section - I think you call it 80/20 over there?
    That's what I did just recently as I wanted a work surface higher than the standard size, and shaped to fit round the end walls of my small workshop.

    It's a bit late to take a picture now, but I'll snap one tomorrow and post it here. This method worked out very well for my needs.

    Peter

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Central IL.
    Posts
    838

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ProGunOne
    The Sam's Club by me (Hodgkins, Il.) has one that looks identical to the one in your picture for $200.00. It looks to be powder coated with the wooden top?
    that sounds about right, i will have to head over to Sam's club and check it out. THe one at sears is rated for 1000 lbs, so maybe in the future i could put my lathe on it (250 lbs).

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Central IL.
    Posts
    838

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Peter Neill
    Why not build one from extruded aluminium section - I think you call it 80/20 over there?
    That's what I did just recently as I wanted a work surface higher than the standard size, and shaped to fit round the end walls of my small workshop.

    It's a bit late to take a picture now, but I'll snap one tomorrow and post it here. This method worked out very well for my needs.

    Peter
    Peter thats an interesting idea, what kind of load do you have on it?

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    New Jersey
    Posts
    832

    Default

    Dan:
    When I first started out I built a couple of benches out of scrap 2 bys. When I set up shop in the "Mud room" I purchased a pair of benches from sears 5 drawers on one side and a cabinet in the other I set them up spo the tops meet but there is about a 2 foot gap between the bases. IMHO you should have as many ball bearing drawers in a work bench as you can afford. A open bench tends to collect boxes of stuff that is hard to get to. Some open space is good for a shop vac or if you are building a bench to sit at you need leg room a welding bench needs room for the welder.
    Tin
    Ad maiorem dei gloriam - Ad vitam paramus

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2001
    Location
    Maine
    Posts
    6,974

    Default

    When I built my bench, my thoughts were: SOLID, and cheap. I ended up bolting a 4x4 to the concrete wall using Star (brand) "Tamp-In" anchors for 3/8" bolts. The top of the bench is a piece of 3/4" plywood ripped the long way and stacked together and glued, producing a 1 1/2" x 2' x 8' top. I covered that with half a sheet of 1/4" tempered Masonite. Under the front edge, inset about 2", I bolted another 4x4, with 4x4 legs held by angle brackets. After 20+ years, it's still solid.

    Regarding size, my thought was that for the stuff I do, I don't need a wide bench top, and 2' would be wide enough. That's turned out to be the case. (Your mileage may vary....)
    ----------
    Try to make a living, not a killing. -- Utah Phillips
    Don't believe everything you know. -- Bumper sticker
    Everybody is ignorant, only on different subjects. -- Will Rogers
    There are lots of people who mistake their imagination for their memory. - Josh Billings
    Law of Logical Argument - Anything is possible if you don't know what you are talking about.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •