Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 22

Thread: Tire shaving ??????????

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Posts
    138

    Post Tire shaving ??????????

    Hi, i bought a Legends race car for circle track racing. The cars run a specific BF Goodrich street tire. The trick with these is to shave camber into them (the right side of the tires with a slightly smaller circumference than the left side). The tires measure about 22.5" diameter but 7" wide.
    There is a place down south that does this, but its $25 a tire + shipping. Kinda a PITA to do all the time.
    Any good HSM ideas to do this?
    I have a brideport M head. I was thinking of using a rotary table and a long end mill(?)
    One of my retired machinist patients suggested a T Lathe...of course he has no idea where to find one. I dont mind spending $300-400 to make this work.
    TIA
    Sean

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Posts
    601

    Post

    Gosh, if your going racing I would assume that the rest of the guys at the track would be able to tell you where best to look for someone to shave tires. Once you see how it is done you might try it yourself and offer discount prices to fellow members.

    I would start by teaming with people at the track.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Posts
    5,725

    Post

    Used to be.. truck tires got regrooved with a heat iron. I think the rubber is different now.
    I had some shaved about what you suggest by accident, spin balance carved one side down with the power rollers.
    If I had the money to play with, I'd set my mill head up at the angle you want and spin the indexer, can't hurt much.
    You may be set up to make some money there.

    I'd be tempted to try adjustable a-frames too. push out, pull in.. see what it does. I am unfamiliar with the lil hot-rods.. they look like fun tho.

    I did some A-frame mod's to a 56 chevy in the 70's I put adjusting bolts so the a frames could not drop.. it had a 327, a 4 speed on the column "using the 3 tree" and a choke cable for reverse, plus a stock car rear axle, I think 5.88.. I would win cases of beer jumping beer bottles with the car. The front tires couldn't drop, so it was not as hard as you think. usually I could stop before I ran over the bottle with the rear.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Posts
    316

    Post

    Hi merf23!Those old tire shavers are gathering dust in a lot of old shops.It used to be commonplace to shave street tires in the days of bias ply tires.Radials don't have the out of round problems that made it a problem before.I've seen a new style shaver in a customers shop.It would only work on new tires.If you used it on an old tire it would ball up rubber and ruin it.The tire will need to be turning fast and a razor edge tool will be a must.Rubber is hard to cut neatly.I'd look arround for a used machine cheap if I were doing it.I didn't know you couldn't adjust the camber on the Legends.I'll ask around for one if you wish.Good luck,Robert.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Pass Christian, MS
    Posts
    978

    Post

    Robert is correct. You should be able to find a shaver at an old tire store. They just collect dust today.

    Joe

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Deep in the Heart of Texas!
    Posts
    5,676

    Post

    I didn't think anyone shaved tires any more--too expensive (labor and tires) and only good for that day. You can get the same effect by changing the camber and caster and tire presure on left and right sides. Hint: more caster = more pull. More camber = more bite. More air = bigger tire.
    Then, there's the spring and shock variations. Doing it this way makes "track condition" changes simple.

  7. #7

    Post

    Sean
    Hey Doc, hows it hangin' bud?

    The monster truck guys still use hot knifes to pare down the weight off their Swampers/Ice field tires (over 500Lbs.!). It is a dirty, ****ty job - and a hand job at that. that is why the shaved tires cost so much, it takes a guy 10-30 minutes to shave a car tire (if he is good).

    Don't try it with a regular knife, the hot knifes are the only ones that work well.

    FWIW - oval track racers set their suspensions to lean the car to one side as they only turned the one way all the time. Road racers set up for neutral bias in the suspension to allow acceptable turning response in both directions. I do not know if this helps.

    [This message has been edited by Thrud (edited 05-07-2003).]

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Posts
    604

    Lightbulb

    If you have a spin balancer you can rig up a belt sander with a relatively coarse belt, mounted on a machine slide for feed adjustments.
    The whole contraption then bolted to a suitable arm and mounted on the balancer.

    Seems like a lot of trouble. If you don't need it too often, then you're probably better off sending them out.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Posts
    138

    Post

    This car is really set up nice for circle track, everything is adjustable including castor, camber, pinion angle, wheelbase, etc
    The street tires we are required to use, need to be shaved to race on otherwise chunks come off from poor heat dissipation.
    From what i read, some guys a few years back started shaving a few degrees camber into them and it helped. Id like to have my own set up so i could 'freshen' the tires periodically and maybe help some other racers out). I am really in this racing bit for fun, not money....i already have a job which is stressful enough. I dont want to get called from the operating room to do an emergency tire shave!
    Ill look out for a shaver.

    BTW anyone is curious, the legends website is 600racing.com

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    Gainesville, FL USA
    Posts
    74

    Post

    Sean,

    Couple of years ago, I remember seeing an article in MCN about truing partly worn motorcycle tires with a Surform file. In that case, tread wore more in the middle than on the sides, creating a flat in the middle of a rounded profile. Bike on centerstand, start engine, use first or second gear. Eyeball the cuts until it looks right (and be careful not to take off too much). Tried it and thought it worked very well.

    Something similar might work for your situation. If you have some number of tires to shave, I'd think you could rig up a rotating spindle with a scrapped hub and lug carrier to fit your wheels....probably at a minimal cost.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •