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Thread: Starrett Speed Indicator: how to use

  1. #1

    Default Starrett Speed Indicator: how to use

    I have a Starrett Speed Indicator that must have belonged to my father or grandfather on the farm (checking machinery speeds?).



    It is like the top one. I have no instructions or manual for this (or any of the rubber tips). Any of you guys use one before? I assume one must use a stop watch or some other means of timing while counting turns. When you stop then graduations allow counting the partial turn for the last digits of the speed? Any help would be appreciated since I am somewhat math challenged and can't figure it out just by looking at the scales.

    Paul

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2006
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    As on the other board, but here for completeness...

    It's not really a "speed indicator", but rather an rpm counter. You zero it, then stick it to the axis of something rotating, and it counts the turns. You can use this to check rpm just like you use a stop watch (or second hand) to check you hear rate. Let it count for, say, 10 seconds. Then multiply by 6 to get RPM.
    I suppose you could also check surface speed similarly if you had a wheel of known circumference.

    I've got one, sets in a drawer... But one day!!!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2004
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    New Jersey
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    yea what he said. I think i used mine once to check the speeds on the little craftman /dunlap. let it cout for one minute and it will give rpms. I think for the most part they are a nice nostaga thing. They are just as usable as they were when built but technology has given us better tools. an import not contact electronic tach can be had for about $30.
    Tin
    Ad maiorem dei gloriam - Ad vitam paramus

  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tin Falcon
    yea what he said. I think i used mine once to check the speeds on the little craftman /dunlap. let it cout for one minute and it will give rpms. I think for the most part they are a nice nostaga thing. They are just as usable as they were when built but technology has given us better tools. an import not contact electronic tach can be had for about $30.
    Tin
    I'm not real big on nostalgia, but I am cheap. $30 is $30... :-) If I don't have to spend it I won't. I've had this thing sitting around for years and just came up with a need to check some RPM and didn't want to spend the bucks for something that I might not use much ever again.

    Thanks BadDog and Tin Falcon!

    Paul

  5. #5
    IOWOLF Guest

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    Go to a hobby lobby or some such, and get a engine RPM meter for a propeller it is switchable from 2 to 3 blades great for lathe chucks.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
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    Lower SE Michigan, USA
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    Paul,
    If you've not figured it out already, you feel the little bump on the rotating dial with your finger or thumb so you can count while watching your stopwatch. The dial makes 1 revolution for every 100 turns of the shaft.

  7. #7
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    central square, ny
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    a couple months ago my compressor started making funny (ok scary) noises and when i looked at it it appeared to be running slowly. so for the first time ever i used the old starrett and sure enough it was running slow. it was also tripping the overloads on the starter. i slaped the fluke on it and it measured 152 volts at 40 hz. i thought this strange and started for my pannel when my son comes out to the garage and asks what i'm doing with the electricity because he has to keep turning the tv on. by the time i get to the pannel we have 36 volts on one phase 0 on the other. that lasted about 6 hours then we had 0/0 for a day. by some miracle nothing was hurt and i got to use my rpm counter. the best part of this was the genius at the power company saying it wasn't an emergency because i wasn't completly out of power i still had some power (36 volts).

  8. #8
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    Umhuh, and that genius could get the power company sued for telling people that and having equipment damaged from a brown out. I sure hope that person wasn't an electrical engineer

    Be carefull using those rpm indicators as fingers and hands can get into places they don't need to go when you are watching a stop watch and counting the turns of the dial and watching where the indicator is. It can get real busy and dangerous.

    Don't ask 'cause I ain't tellin'.
    Last edited by Carld; 09-25-2007 at 11:44 AM.
    It's only ink and paper

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
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    Default Starrett Speed Indicator: how to use

    When I first got mine, in a box of old junk at a flea market, I looked in several old books and found a pretty good explanation and instructions for use. I believe it was Machinery's Handbook, but it may have been a Starrett publication put out as a handy book for machinists. I don't remember the title and the book is packed up out west now.
    Jim (KB4IVH)

    Only fools abuse their tools.

  10. #10

    Default Starrett speed thingy

    Thanks for all the replies guys.

    Just for s.... and giggles I emailed the tech support email address at Starrett and got a reply. They gave me info for a #104 which sounds closer to what I have and a #107 which is for higher RPMs and has another ring that goes around once for every 100 Revs of the fast ring (or something like that). I'm not sure if that number is a newer model of the same thing but the instructions basically agree with what I've heard here from you all...

    Surprised me that Starrett answered such a trivial little question about an "old" technology...maybe they still sell these things along with the fancy electronic ones?

    Paul

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