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Thread: Building a bench for Logan 200

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Posts
    139

    Default Building a bench for Logan 200

    My - for me - new Logan came with a stand and chip pan. Like this:

    http://bridgeport.askmisterscience.com/logan200.jpg

    I would actually prefer to put it on a bench. I checked out HF, Grizzly, Sears - and nothing really fits my purpose. Would you know any other source for a lathe table?

    It looks like I will have to build it to make sure it is the way I want it. It would be nice to see your setup.

    Also, is there an ergonomic height for lathe? I am 6'2" and normal work bench is usually too short for me.

    I am afraid I am gonna ask all these dam questions for a while

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Oroville, WA
    Posts
    10,952

    Default

    When I bought my combo lathe/mill from Grizzly I also bought the large bench legs on this page: http://www.grizzly.com/catalog/2007/Main/254. I topped it with a very heavy duty solid core door. The door weighs close to if not more than 100 lbs and is quite inflexible as a bench top. It has enough room for my lathe and leaves plenty of room for tools, tool trays, and my Kennedy tool box. The shelf area is planked with 5/4 hemlock and easily holds my Kurt wannabe vise and plenty of metal stock, chucks, etc.

    I bought a large oil drip pan from the local auto parts store and a smaller secondary drip pan for easy chip/coolant removal (See Frank Ford's page: http://www.frets.com/FRETSPages/Mach...okiesheet.html for a similar arrangement). I thought I had some pictures of it but I can't find them if I do.

  3. #3
    tattoomike68 Guest

    Default

    My bench is a stout old engine table on casters that used to hold cattapillar tractor engines.

    Its 34 inches tall and the spindle center is about 46" from the floor. Im 6' 3" with a bad back so I cant be stooping over a lathe.


  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Jersey City, NJ
    Posts
    586

    Default

    I have that Logan on it's legs & pan, and have been happy with it. It sure makes sweeping behind the lathe easy! It's previous owner also mounted a set of drawers under the pan, handy for the gears, collet closer, etc. Why not just put some steel or alum channel between the legs and pan to get the bed up to a comfortable height for you?

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    Portland, Oregon
    Posts
    535

    Default

    I once used one of those old army steel desks.
    Some have 'pull-outs' for typewriters.
    Very super heavy duty built, and make a very steady vibration free bench for a lathe.
    Plus they have several roller mounted drawers to keep the tooling in.
    I still see them in surplus stores, junk stores and the like for about $25.

    Last one I had, I turned upside down to move it, and a note fell out of it rolled up in a $1 silver certificate. The note read 'Please buy me a Sandwich and Coffee'.

    Tom M.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Independent principality of Sinquefieldia (formerly Missouri)
    Posts
    17,134

    Default

    Stand up, raise your hand so your forearm is horizontal. Measure up to it, and most likely that is best height for the cranks.

    Table should be solid and stout. After that it is your option, really. No need to obsess about it.

    I used a metal-top table, and put about 1 3/4" of wood under the metal top. partial view here, including the modified oil drip pan chip collector.


  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    Ashland City, TN
    Posts
    2,295

    Default

    Mine came equipted with a chip pan and stand and I like it better than any bench I had for the first lathe I had. What do you find objectionalbe about this set-up??

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Albuquerque
    Posts
    2,168

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by mayfieldtm
    Last one I had, I turned upside down to move it, and a note fell out of it rolled up in a $1 silver certificate. The note read 'Please buy me a Sandwich and Coffee'.
    Tom M.
    Boy, that had to WWII vintage. :-)
    ...lew...

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Posts
    157

    Default

    I made a wood bench for my Logan 820, ala Gingery, and put shelves and the like on 1" angle iron underneath. 2 - 1" thick pieces of marine grade plywood bonded together form the top.



    Ken-

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2001
    Location
    Maine
    Posts
    6,714

    Default

    J Tiers gives the general guideline: height such that your forearm is horizontal when turning the carriage handwheel. It wouldn't hurt to build in a little height adjustment in case experience suggests that something different would be better for you, personally.

    I've got my South Bend 10K on a wood bench, top made of 2 layers of 3/4" plywood laminated together, 4x4 legs, 1/4" plywood across the legs and back. It's solid, but in retrospect I think I might opt for a metal stand, at least for the legs. Not sure, but I might. Unistrut might be an option.
    ----------
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