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Thread: pinstriping tool

  1. #1
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    Default pinstriping tool

    Has anyone made a pinstriping tool the kind that uses a small tube with a wheel on the end for lining cars models etc, If so was it a success and have you any drawings.
    MBB

  2. #2
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    Default

    Personally, I prefer a Paasche Flow Pencil- I have been using one for over 20 years to pinstripe and draw on various diverse objects

    http://www.paascheairbrush.com/airbrush_specialty.html

    But for the wheel type, these Beuglers look pretty good-

    http://www.beugler.com/how2.html

    You can download their manual for free, it has a crude exploded drawing you could work from.

    Seems kinda unlikely that there would be free, detailed blueprints of a patented product available online- If I was the patent owners, I would sure be sending out those cease and desist letters..

    You can buy a head alone from Beugler for 23 bucks- or a whole tool for just over a hundred- If I was serious about making one, I would drop the Benjamin, and see how its done right. Then, if you want, you can always sell the original and keep your copy.
    A hundred bucks is pretty cheap for years of R&D, and for somebody working out the best manufacturing techniques, using a couple hundred grands worth of machines.
    Eastwood has the heads on sale for $15-
    http://www.eastwoodco.com/jump.jsp?i...mType=CATEGORY

    I buy CD's from Amazon UK from time to time, stuff that isnt released in the USA, and it is cheap to ship a small package like that from there to here- I cant imagine it would be all that expensive to get one back the other way.

    You might post at this site- although I would bet most of these guys use brushes.
    http://www.pinheadlounge.com
    Last edited by Ries; 11-08-2007 at 08:55 AM.

  3. #3
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    Default

    A friend of mine builds a couple hundred trailers a year (has a good sized factory now). He pinstripes them all by hand. He's pretty darn good at it.
    He gave me a couple of his older wheel stripers. He'd bought a beuglar and never used them any more.
    I soon found out why he gave them to me. They don't work very well. I agree with ries about the R+D.
    I have tools I don't even know I own...

  4. #4
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    WA Western Australia
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    Default

    Lotsa practise and a squirrel-hair swordliner
    Just got my head together
    now my body's falling apart

  5. #5
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    Default

    Apparently the Beugler paint lining tool was patented in 1935, 70+years ago and the inventor will have probably been dead along time and the patent lapsed. In uk the cost is around 75 about 150$ plus postage. I didn't want to buy one as it may never be used but it seemed like an interestng project to make. I am sure others may find this an interesting project
    MBB

  6. #6
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    You dont say if you have already done this- but the original patent drawing is available free online-
    http://patimg1.uspto.gov/.piw?Docid=...iew+first+page

    Many products are available cheaper in the USA than the same product sells for anywhere else. And certainly in the UK- you guys seem to pay about double what we do for most things.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ries
    You dont say if you have already done this- but the original patent drawing is available free online-

    Many products are available cheaper in the USA than the same product sells for anywhere else. And certainly in the UK- you guys seem to pay about double what we do for most things.
    Tell me about it. People take the dollar price and just add a sign to the front when in fact there are over 2 dollars to the pound.

    Add to this imports from the US are valued at 18% duty whereas from China it's 5%.

    What pisses me off is UK companies who sell cheaper to the US because "That's what the market will stand" than in the UK.

    As an example Alphacam is $5000 in the US and 7500 here [ $15,000], if I bought a copy in the US for $5000 [ 2500] they wouldn't support it.

    Newall DRO's are the same.

    I have to admire people like Rhino software who quote US$ to whoever buys it no matter where, that levels the playing field out.

    .
    Last edited by John Stevenson; 11-08-2007 at 03:09 PM.
    .

    Sir John , Earl of Bligeport & Sudspumpwater. MBE [ Motor Bike Engineer ] Nottingham England.




  8. #8
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    John- on small purchases like this, would you get charged the 15% duty?

    I know when I order the latest Jacknife Lee CD from Amazon UK, it costs only a few bucks for shipping, with no duty or extra taxes- in fact, it usually only costs about what I would pay at a full retail music store here- about 10 pounds total.

    For something small, that could go post or Fed ex, wouldnt it be worth it to just charge it online and have it shipped from the USA?

    I realize $5000 software is different, but it would seem practical for small tools, books, and so on.

  9. #9
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    Ries,

    Yes it is worth it, well worth it given the to $ difference.
    At the moment I'm buying quite a lot from the US as regards books and oddments.

    Books I get shipped to a friend in AZ and when he's got an M bag full he sends it M bag rate, takes ages to get here, 2 months or so but it's still cheap and it's not as if I was waiting.

    Duty usually runs on cost, anything under about 50 and going to a private address they usually ignore, books are zero rated anyway here.

    It's companies who insist on stating the full worth on the customs slip.
    I have even had repaired electronic boards that I've paid duty on declared as a new board and had to pay duty on again.............

    Best one I got away with were 8 stepper drives when they were expensive, taped back to back and declared as 4 S/H robotics boards. The parcel was adddressed to Master J Stevenson and Happy Birthday Nephew written all over it, Customs never gave it a second look

    .
    .

    Sir John , Earl of Bligeport & Sudspumpwater. MBE [ Motor Bike Engineer ] Nottingham England.




  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Colton, Washington, USA
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    Default

    Personally, I prefer a Paasche Flow Pencil- I have been using one for over 20 years to pinstripe and draw on various diverse objects.
    Ries, I see there are 1/32" and 1/64" nibs. Do they actually produce a very fine line? I have a Beugler and its narrowest wheel produces a line that is much too wide for most scale models.

    Orrin
    So many projects. So little time.

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