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Thread: Adaption of a quill speed handle for a Bridgeport clone

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
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    N W La.
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    Default Adaption of a quill speed handle for a Bridgeport clone

    So I thought I would like to have one of the speed handles for the quill feed on my ENCO Bridgeport clone, so I order one up.....It dont fit!!, not even!!

    So, then I'm telling my machine Guru friend Lane about it and of course he seems to know everything there is to know about Bridgeports and their kin, (and most every other machine) so he rattles off some things to look for and do to make one up. It seems these "clones" have some peculiarities enough different from the Bridgeport to get you in a jam trying to fit up an aftermarket part. We had already run into this fitting up a knee power feed to it...even had Lane scratching his head on that for a few minutes.

    This is a pix of what I had ..... on the right is the original handle parts, in the middle is main part of the bought speed handle, and on the left is the parts of what I built utilizing the bought handle.



    This is a close up of the machined pieces, the dished washer has to be fitted and screwed to the quill shaft inside the body underneath the pivoting handle to prevent the body from coming off, where the original design had a set screw.



    This is what it looks like mounted on the mill, --- made a neat addition

    If everything seems to be going well, you have obviously overlooked something........

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
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    On the Oil Coast,USA
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    16,725

    Default

    Looks like you got it nailed,had similar problem on our old MSC mill at work.The new handle was bored .812,but the mill's shaft was .719.It only took a bushing but it was aggrevating.

    I also found out the quill size was different,the B-port uses a 3.375 od quill IIRC and our machine has a 3.390 od,just enough so that none of the aftermarket right angle heads fit unless they are borred first.

    Seems "Asian Heinz57" is a better description that b-port clone since it seems no two different makes are ever alike.
    I just need one more tool,just one!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Northeastern Iowa
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    63

    Default Surface Treatment?

    Bill

    That’s some nice work! Curious what you’ve used for a surface treatment on the parts, looks like a black oxide of some sort, do you do that yourself? I’ve been out of the loop for a few years but know there used to be a product/process called “Presto Black”, a cold process that gave reasonable results, but it seems as though a lot of those things have gone by the wayside in the last five years. Your parts look more uniform, a very professional job.

    Thanks

    Chandler

  4. #4
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    Jul 2005
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    N W La.
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    Default

    Chandler, yeah thats 'cold' blacking from Brownells. I've tried 3-4 types/brands and it seems to give the best results...but, the key to any of the 'cold' treatments is "CLEAN, CLEAN, CLEAN!! the method I've settled on for expediency and decent results is to bead blast the piece/s and immediately get the solution on (I try to dip/submerge if possible), using much caution for fingerprints.

    The M-2/ MaDeuce machine gun model on the shelf in the upper left of the mill pic was done with the Brownells and it sure made the gun look good
    If everything seems to be going well, you have obviously overlooked something........

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2006
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    Phoenix, AZ
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    Default

    Nice work! I've been thinking about adding one of those to my mill as well. That stupid pinned thing is NEVER in the right place, aggravating to get INTO the right place, and vibrates out during heavy cuts.

  6. #6

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Pace
    Chandler, yeah thats 'cold' blacking from Brownells. I've tried 3-4 types/brands and it seems to give the best results...but, the key to any of the 'cold' treatments is "CLEAN, CLEAN, CLEAN!! the method I've settled on for expediency and decent results is to bead blast the piece/s and immediately get the solution on (I try to dip/submerge if possible), using much caution for fingerprints.

    The M-2/ MaDeuce machine gun model on the shelf in the upper left of the mill pic was done with the Brownells and it sure made the gun look good

    Bill

    Where did you get your plans for the M2?

    Can't have a real one but a scaled model (non firing) would be nice.
    Cheers

    Craig
    Brisbane Australia

  7. #7
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    Jul 2005
    Location
    Bloomington, IN
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    4,599

    Red face

    Please excuse my newbie-ness, but how exactly do "speed handles" for a bridgeport work? I've never seen them before. The bridgey's i've been working on have a pretty simple handle that you can sort of index to different posistions. Its a real pita though... i can see where a "speed handle" would be nice. Just wondering what it does/how it works.

  8. #8
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    May 2006
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    Default

    Yes, that's typical. And yea, a PIA to be sure.

    The "speed handle" I want, like that pictured above, works with a rotating mount and a lever action handle. By moving the lever in/out you engage/disengage the dog(?) clutch. So it's easily disengaged and positioned before locking for feed; then disengage and grab the next convenient start point...

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Marshalltown, IA
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    Default

    They are a 'must have' if you have Bridgeport or clone. After fighting with the original handle design for a year, I bought one of these handles for my Enco clone. Like so many others, it didn't fit. In my case the bore was too small. I pulled it apart, bored it to the correct size, and reinstalled it. Shortly thereafter, the ball end of the pin came out of the socket in the handle. I pulled it apart again, reinstalled the pin and peened the edge of the socket properly.
    The early bird may get the worm but the second mouse gets the cheese.

  10. #10
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    Default

    These clones MUST be more different than I thought.... my handles bore was perfect fit -- 1"-- but wasnt nearly deep enough to let the handle fit up,--- note the taller body.


    Craig, The M-2, and 1917 & 1918 Brownings plans are offered by:

    http://www.ccsprints.com/

    using the venerable Ruger 10/22 for the barrel and action as a donor gun ---

    Also, just recently a member here has offered plans for a MG-42 German machine gun, again based on the 10/22, that looks like its gonna be a fun build. I've just about got all the materials lined up to start on it... Here the thread that tells about it---

    http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/showthread.php?t=26322
    If everything seems to be going well, you have obviously overlooked something........

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