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Thread: Please confirm MW article on Penetrating Oil

  1. #31
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    I use Kroil for small stuff like nuts, but I really like the ATF/acetone mixture for serious work, like this:



    I filled the jugs and let them soak for a day. Then I applied a little gentle persuasion:



    The ATF/acetone mixture penetrated the stuck rings, and even did a good job of cleaning off the piston heads and jug walls:


  2. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hal
    That Trichloroethane is supposed to be great cutting fluid for tough stuff?
    An old-timer's recipe for cutting oil was olive oil and carbon tetrachloride (which was banned worldwide in 1970), supposedly works unbelievably well.

    Trichloroethane supposedly works almost as well, but that was banned worldwide in 1996 by the Montreal Convention.

  3. #33
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    Hi all,
    I'm a new guy to machining but not to Kroil. Been using it for years and have found something that works better. It is KB88 made by LPS. My wife brought some home and told me I should try it. I was impressed. BTW it is the color of ATF
    HSS
    Last edited by HSS; 02-05-2008 at 10:06 PM.

  4. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by HSS
    I'm a new guy to machining but not to Kroil. Been using it for years and have found something that works better. It is KB88 made by LPS.
    Funny that you mention that HSS -- I just remembered that I bought a can of that LPS KB88 stuff the last time I was at Grainger! Need to try it!

  5. #35
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    Fasttrack-- Unless my memory fails me, the test fixturing was a bunch of pins pressed in holes of fixed sizes. I would not have wanted to be in charge of trying to develop test fixtures for this and don't know that I could do any better, but pins in bores being pressed out is not quite the same as a bolt threaded into a hole. The latter involves much more surface area. Think about the linear distance if you unwrapped all of the threads from say 1.5" of a 12, 16, or 20 TPI bolt. That's a long way to try to get a penetrant to flow.

    I think the corrosion conditions were much shorter duration than say a bolt that spent 5 years under your car in salt water etc. If I recall correctly, dwell time for the test fixtures in the corrosive mixture was rather short, even though it went through several cycles. I tend to think that corrosive adhesion comes from metal transfer from one surface to a mating surface through galvanic action....the longer it occurs the deeper it goes. Again, like I said, I am sure compromises had to be made in setting up the tests. Likely a guy can't spend 10 years rusting something so he can test penetrating oils

    My only test after mixing up a batch was in removing front brake caliper mounting bolts on my pickup--which I realize was hardly scientific. Both were stuck on both sides and those that got Kroil came loose enough more quickly that I ended up wiping the home brew off and using Kroil on all of them so I could move on with the project...but that's hardly scientific. I wonder, however, if its important to separate penetrating ability from force applied when the previously frozen part finally gives way. The test in the magazine tended to show the latter.

    I think with any of the products that time is your friend. They all need time to penetrate and do their work.

    Paul
    Paul Carpenter
    Mapleton, IL

  6. #36
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    I keep a can of KB88 in my shop at home, and I put a can on my truck but my son took my can from my truck and put it on his truck. Now I have to use the Kroil on my truck.

  7. #37
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    pcarpenter,

    Waiting ten years for the test material to rust is bad enough, the real b***h is keeping every thing at uniform temperature, humidity, ect. for the whole ten years so that every sample is exactly the same. These's definitely a reason for engineering accelerated corrosion tests.
    Last edited by lbender; 02-06-2008 at 02:22 PM.

  8. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by lazlo
    An old-timer's recipe for cutting oil was olive oil and carbon tetrachloride (which was banned worldwide in 1970), supposedly works unbelievably well.

    Trichloroethane supposedly works almost as well, but that was banned worldwide in 1996 by the Montreal Convention.
    I was Googling around for Trichlorethane, and surprisingly, you can buy it in small quantities at chemical supply houses. But check the price: $155 for 100ml (!)

    http://www.chemical-supermarket.com/...100ml-p52.html
    Current Product Status:

    This is now an EPA-regulated chemical due to its ozone-depleting properties. U.S. production was stopped in 1996 and, though not prohibited, it is taxed heavily and is now available only in small quantities.


  9. #39
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    So what's the final result? Was the stuff in the test (not the photo) ATF or PS fluid?

  10. #40
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    See post #18 in this thread (by the author of the article).

    Paul
    Paul Carpenter
    Mapleton, IL

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