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Thread: homemade table saw rip fence

  1. #1

    Default homemade table saw rip fence

    I have a 10" craftsman table saw and would like to make a rip fence that is accurate and dependable. If you can refer me to a source of plans or have other recommendations--please advise. Thanks Paul

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Baton Rouge, LA
    Posts
    16

    Default

    Check out Fine Woodworking's Shop Accessories You Can Build. There is an article about making a Biesemeyer style fence. It should give you some ideas, but the fence is sort of crude.

    Kurt

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 1999
    Location
    SE OZ
    Posts
    1,966

    Default Fence etc.

    Thanks Kurt.

    I have an interest in that as well.

    I "Googled" "Fine Woodworking" and got the following links:
    http://www.google.com.au/search?hl=e...G=Search&meta=

    http://www.taunton.com/finewoodworking/

    http://www.taunton.com/finewoodworki...oodWorking.com

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Baton Rouge, LA
    Posts
    16

  5. #5

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Temple, Tx
    Posts
    1,037

    Default

    I don't have a specific link, but I do have several suggestions. First, it is very useful to have a fence that sticks out both behind and in front of the saw table. This will help you control large panels before they reach the blade and as they exit the blade. Secondly, I find it useful to be able to lock down the back of the fence as well as the front. This is helpful if you are using the fence with a hold down that puts downward force on the work. The yellow wheel type work hold downs are a good example, but many other jigs apply downward force on the work. My own saw fence is a type that is no longer made (Paralock), but it has a drawing table type wire setup that keeps the fence parallel to the blade as you move it. I have compared it to a Biesemeyer with a dial indicator and it is much better at keeping the blade parallel. Part of the reason is that the rear of the fence locks as well as the front.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    1,431

    Default Table Saw Fence

    Fine Woodworking ran an article on a fence design by a retired electrical engineer, (electrician?) from Victoria, BC. The design relied upon Unistrut for the fence rails and rectangular tubing for the fence itself. It was "tarted up" by using anodized aluminum extrusions an is(was) marketed as an aftermarket unit by Busy Bee tools. I have one on my Craftex cabinet saw, and I find that it works very well, maintains parallelism, quick to set and accepts accesories. You could sure build it from the article for a LOT less than the commercial unit, and it would serve very well on a Craftsman saw.

  8. #8

    Default

    Duffy
    I built the unistrut version from FWW and used it for a long time and it works very well. Mine was on a 10 inch Craftsman. There was another version published in FWW that more resembled the Biesmeyer and it looks very simple to build.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Posts
    7,693

    Default

    I made my own and overhead collection system even had the biesemyer name made up Alistair






    Last edited by Alistair Hosie; 02-28-2008 at 04:38 PM.
    Please excuse my typing as I have a form of parkinsons disease

  10. #10

    Smile

    Check out these links for some tamle saw accessories.

    http://home.comcast.net/~jaswensen/

    http://members.aol.com/Alamaral/WoodShop.html
    When I get Time... I'll...

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