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Thread: Welding Rod Dryer

  1. #1

    Question Welding Rod Dryer

    Has anyone out there built a welding rod dryer? An old fridge or freezer with a light bulb is one idea thrown out earlier. I'm looking for something more like the ones in the catalogs which look like a bench top furnace. Something small and quick. A ten pound capacity would be ideal. Right now the idea is a two pieces of pipe/tubing with a layer of insulation between them and a heating element. One end would be capped and the other would contain a vent.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Posts
    316

    Lightbulb

    For drying out would a toaster oven work?The shop that does my TIG welding uses an old microwave with a light bulb in it to keep theirs dry.
    Robert.

    [This message has been edited by gamachinist (edited 07-05-2003).]

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    Huntsville Ala
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    Related question: Does drying rods that had previously absorbed moisture restore them to anything approaching their 'new' condition?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Posts
    594

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    I found a small drying oven at a flea market, got it for 5 bucks. I think it was out of a lab, its a little on the small side (you have to put the welding rods in at an angle to close the door) but for as little welding as I do its was good deal.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Bremerton Washington
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    A toaster oven works great proviced you con find one that till take them full length.

    Drying some kinds of rod takes hours and you cay go much above 180 degrees F for some reason.

    Thing to do is find an old built-in oven and super insulate it with 6" of batt insulation. This will store several hundred lb so you can get a it easily. You can run it from 115 because you're not running that hot.

  6. #6
    jfsmith Guest

    Post

    I took an old dead microwave and stuck a 100 watt light bulb in it, it's a great dryer, plus I kept the rotary table alive in it.

    This is uded for welding rod, horn, and woods.

    Didn't cost much and works great.

    Jerry

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Posts
    465

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    Once a rod absorbs moisture, it's basically crap, but that's in the nuclear power plant and aerospace industries. For our purposes, you can re-dry and use them.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    On the Oil Coast,USA
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    16,855

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    You must have a heater capable of at least 230*f,anything less and the rods will soak up water from the atmosphere,I usually keep mine at around 300f because I usually pull enough rods to complete the weld,if I were going to make one I would use an element out of a cheap toaster and rig up a temp. control,but then again they can usually be had on ebay for around $60.00 for the smaller ones and $100.00 for the larger models.
    I just need one more tool,just one!

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
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    5,725

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    ONE thing, Bdarin is probably right about the damp rods, wet rods are another story..

    The MSDS on 7018 welding rods, says it is very nasty fumes coming off the rod. ONLY use in adequate ventilation.

    Anything with chrome steel in it is very nasty to weld. Causes cancer pretty quick.
    I got a fan in my shop to exchange the air.

    David

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Posts
    426

    Post

    The purpose of having "dry" welding rods is to prevent or reduce hydrogen embrittlement of the weld. If a flux coated welding rod gets exposed to normal humid air it absorbs some water into the flux coating. The purpose of the rod box is just to keep the rods warm enough to keep the relative humidity around the rods low enough that they will not absorb water vapor. The box does not have to be more than about 150 F even in very humid conditions. A rod box will not be very fast in reclaiming rods that have been out in th open for a few weeks. To do that the rods need to be baked in an oven at a few hundred degrees for several hours. There are procedures specified for doing that. All this dry rod stuff is applicable to so called "low hydrogen" rods. Regular rods such as E-6013, 6011 and others used on construction and pipeline work are not low hydrogen rods and don't necessarily have to be kept in a hot rod box. Obviously bare rods like those used in TIG welding don't need to be in a rod box. The flux on stick rods is the material to be kept dry. An old refrigerator with a big light bulb will keep rods pretty dry if you keep the door closed and the frig is kept inside a reasonably dry shop. No need to have a really hot oven.

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