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Thread: Treadmill Motor/Controller Conversion

  1. #1

    Wink Treadmill Motor/Controller Conversion


    Hi Guys and (Gals?),

    Has anybody out there converted a treadmill motor drive to run a lathe or mill to get variable speeds? I would like to hear about your how-to-do-it experiences. Thanks.

    Kurt

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
    Posts
    801

    Post


    No, but sounds like a heck of a good idea.
    Let us know how you make out.
    Have fun
    kapullen

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Posts
    8

    Post

    Kurt: You might try
    groups.yahoo.com/group/atlas_craftsman There have been several posts on this subject.
    Don

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Posts
    154

    Talking

    Personally I've never seen or even heard of any gal machinists/toolmakers. Most of 'em don't show much interest or even know what machining is. I reckon this must be a guy thing huh? Could it be genetic somehow; gals like soft things like fabrics and flowers and us manly types like hard things I suppose. Yeah, hard and strong like us! :-P

    Steve

  5. #5

    Unhappy

    Steve
    I know at least three very yummy lady mechanics. Two of them own their own shop. One is the head Partsperson for a major Mercedes dealership. Oh, Lordy would I dig a "ol' lady o' the wrenches". "Honey, pass me that 15/16" spline socket, if you could..."

    It is but to dream...

    Kurt,

    Yes you could use one for your lathe. It does imploy lethal currents and high DC voltages so kludging something together is not a good idea. Everything must follow national and local electrical safety rules. Unless you have some electrical/electronics engineering background I would not bother with it. Designing a safe DC drive with proper current drive and safety features is not an easy task.

    I would suggest a commercial Variable Frequency Drive for your AC motor as a practical alternative.

    Dave


  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
    Posts
    1,241

    Post

    A bunch of folks on the atlas_craftsman@yahoogroups email group have done it, using the stuff from Surplus Center. A couple mods to the controller and yer off. Still need the countershaft etc, tho.

    BTW, savvy females do exist. While my wife is no machinist, she can sort bolts, knows what the tools are and how to use many of them, and finds me deals on machines in the paper.
    She likes hardware stores. Works for me!

  7. #7

    Wink

    <font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by Daubie:

    Hi Guys and (Gals?),

    Has anybody out there converted a treadmill motor drive to run a lathe or mill to get variable speeds? I would like to hear about your how-to-do-it experiences. Thanks.

    Kurt
    </font>
    ----------------------------
    Hi guys,

    One thing nice about talking to one's self, one's inner being, is, he can always keep himself entertained! People do look at you funny and DO keep their distance!

    Most female types I have worked with in the shops, wormed their way into "cushy" jobs with their lady charms and what-have-you, but most not that good skill wise. But there was one that came to our shop, that came out of the NAVY program that was damn good as a machinist. Guys are not too kind to ladies in this trade, I guess they feel threatened or something, she did not stay long.

    Over to www.delphi.com the SHOPMASTER/SHOPTASK USERS GROUP forum
    the treadmill issue has been discussed at message # 821.1 thru #821.30 utilising the SURPLUS CENTER's stuff. Some guys have done other things to get variable speeds, just have to wade thru the archives.

    I've been doing a round of physical therapy for my back. While doing my 2 mile walk on the treadmill, I got thinking why not get just the motor and controller from a SEARS model from SEARS parts people and then just do it. I would think some kind of gear or pulley "opposite of reduction gearing" would be necessary to achieve 1750 RPM of the drive motor, but was wondering about the torque being adequate. The treadmill at my PT plugs into a 110 volt, 15 amp wall recepticle. Thanks for the response and input.

    Kurt

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Posts
    389

    Post

    Daubie,I used a 90v DC,treadmill motor,3/4 hp on my drill press. I used a schematic from one of my heap of shop magazines to make a convertor.I need to install a jackshaft to reduce the speed.Works great for small drills so far.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Posts
    102

    Post

    I have used DC motors for power feed. The controlers that come with some of them must be turned down to zero for each start so I use Variacs which work well and are much simpler to hook up.It just needs a large bridge rectifier and switch.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Posts
    6

    Lightbulb

    An article on this subject was publisned in H.S.M. dated May/june 1996 and Jan/Feb 1997.I built a drive based on this Article and am working on smoothing the output and increasing the speed range.

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