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Thread: Miller Maxstar 140 or 150 TIG/Stick Invertor

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Central Iowa
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    620

    Default Miller Maxstar 140 or 150 TIG/Stick Invertor

    I'm wondering if anyone has used one of these and if any problems, or repairs needed.

    I'd also consider purchasing one used in very good or like new condition. BG in Iowa
    Retired - Journeyman Refrigeration Pipefitter - Master Electrician - Amateur Machinist

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Beaverton, OR
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    Default

    I have owned both. The 140 was a nice little machine. Actually made by some company in norway I believe as miller couldnt get their design working. When they did it came out as the 150.

    The 140 is a OK little machine. Two different ranges on the knob when in 120 vs 240. When a remote is connected it is not possible to set max current on the machine. Unless you can find one really cheap I would go for the 150.

    The 150 come in 3 flavors. 150S (Stick) 150STL (Lift arc tig) and 150STH (Hi-freq arc start) You want wither the STL or STH. The STH has a couple extra features as well like pulsing.

  3. #3
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    Central Iowa
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    Smile

    Quote Originally Posted by macona
    I have owned both. The 140 was a nice little machine. Actually made by some company in norway I believe as miller couldnt get their design working. When they did it came out as the 150.

    The 140 is a OK little machine. Two different ranges on the knob when in 120 vs 240. When a remote is connected it is not possible to set max current on the machine. Unless you can find one really cheap I would go for the 150.

    The 150 come in 3 flavors. 150S (Stick) 150STL (Lift arc tig) and 150STH (Hi-freq arc start) You want wither the STL or STH. The STH has a couple extra features as well like pulsing.
    Thanks. I just purchased a close out Miller Maxstar 150 STL on ebay. The only difference besides the $200, is the one I have needs to have the voltage tap changed by the user vs Automatic change over.

    Now I'd like to sell my Harbor Freight TIG / stick welder, which actually is not all that bad. But I had the money and wanted a Miller : )... helping the economy.
    Retired - Journeyman Refrigeration Pipefitter - Master Electrician - Amateur Machinist

  4. #4
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    Default

    None of the Maxstars have a tap that changes over. All are autoswitching 120/240.

  5. #5
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by macona
    None of the Maxstars have a tap that changes over. All are autoswitching 120/240.
    You are correct. This one came set up with a 120 volt 20 amp plug, which I changed to to a standard 230 volt welder type. I put a spare 120 volt plug into the carry case, just if sometime I wanted to switch back to 120 volt for a job.

    It is the smoothest, best starting stick welder I've ever used. Also seems to be slightly "hotter" than my Hobart stick welder, setting for setting.
    I love it. I am going to set up the TIG and try next.

    Now to keep my sons from borrowing!! Thanks for your help.
    Retired - Journeyman Refrigeration Pipefitter - Master Electrician - Amateur Machinist

  6. #6
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    hen I had oI just made a short extension that went from 120 to 240 plug.

  7. #7
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by macona
    hen I had oI just made a short extension that went from 120 to 240 plug.
    Yes, That is what I did for my Plasma cutter, but I was afraid I would leave it behind on a job and be SOL so I just changed out the plug.
    I can put a 120 volt one back on in less than 5 minutes.... IF I ever need to. I have also made up a 6 ft tap 10/3 cord, that has the welder receptacle on one end and the other is stripped back, tinned and ready to connect to a 230 volt circuit breaker and equipment ground in a panel.
    Retired - Journeyman Refrigeration Pipefitter - Master Electrician - Amateur Machinist

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