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Thread: Sajo horizontal/vertical milling machine

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
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    Norway
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    355

    Default Sajo horizontal/vertical milling machine

    I saw an ad for this old Swedish made milling machine, and I can get it for not much money.
    The only problem is that I don't really have room for this type of large and heavy thing now, I would probably have to store it some place meanwhile.

    It's from the late fifties, and looked interesting to me because of the vertical milling attachment that you can see mounted on the machine. I don't know how common those are. There is power feed on both X and Y axis.

    According to seller everything works, but it has not been used for a long time and there is some rust as the pictures show, and it should be dismantled and reconditioned.

    Table length: 120cm (47")
    Height: about 150cm (59")
    Weight: about 1000kg (2200lbs)

    The weight seems a bit heavy to me for this size, but I don't know really.

    Spindle taper is unknown. I can take a guess at Morse taper, because that seems very common in Swedish machines (maybe not in the horizontal spindle).
    I have not seen it in person.







    What do you think? Is it a usable machine for a home shop?


    .
    Thomas

    Problems worthy of attack prove their worth by hitting back
    - Piet Hein


  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Lexington, Ohio
    Posts
    2,579

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    Of course it could be useful in the home ship Thomas.
    Couple things to think about is, are you up to a re-condition and where you have to store it, is there electric and room to work on it ?, is it close by ?.
    The fact that you are not ready for it could provide the needed time for the re-conditioning.

    It would be a job for sure, depending on what condition it is really in upon inspection but you would have a very rugged piece of equipment for sure. Horizontal machines are not as versatile as a pure vertical but that issue mat be minimized with the vertical attachment, although it looks to be of secondary use and would not be as versatile as a dedicated vertical.

    Down the road you may find yourself wanting a more traditional vertical milling machine so will you have room for both at that time ?

    If question the room you may have then it may be wise to look / wait for a dedicated vertical machine.

    Ken

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Austin, Texas
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    That's a neat machine -- never heard of Sajo before. It's got a universal table, which often meant it was for a toolroom environment. Am I seeing the picture right that it has a universal overarm mount too (a vertical spindle that rotates via a spiral bevel gear)? If so, that's really cool!

    But like Ken says, it's going to be a lot of work to restore it -- looks like it was stored outside...
    "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did."

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Scotland.
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    Nice little machine.It is a universal mill.Weight will be at least 1000kg`s.Looks older than late fifties to me but may just be the mess it`s in.If the price is right it would be a nice starter machine although you may have problems finding morse taper arbours for horizontal milling if it is indeed a morse spindle.
    Mark.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Baltimore, MD
    Posts
    125

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    Get it, fix it, use it, keep it...

    You can do all kinds of stuff with a machine like that. The envelope will be smaller than something like a Bridgeport, but this machines convertible nature will allow a wide variety of setups and tooling.

    Looks kind of old for a mid-50's machine but you never know. 2200 lbs might be a little high but not much, certainly will weight lots more than 1/2 that. Looks like the base might be a coolant recovery reservoir- if so it could be packed full of chips and rotten coolant.

    Regards,

    Greg

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Columbus, Ohio
    Posts
    2,349

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    Almost all small and medium sized machines are good home shop machines. Given that they fit your capability. Keep in mind,
    1-Can you move it or have it moved.
    2-Are you willing to give her the TLC she needs so that she can do what you want
    3-For you specifically, can you afford to store it and then have it for later

    Sure there are pitfalls. You may find that the taper is such that you just cant find new or used tooling for it. Can you make some? If so, do you want to spend the time to make it? I have found that sometimes making the tooling is either the best time of my life or the worst. Motor working? Etc.....

    Personally, if I could get it and move it home for $100 +/- a bit, I would buy it and have a rainy day project.

    In the end, its back to you and your wants/needs.

    I do like the milling attachment..... Cool.

    rock~
    Civil engineers build targets, Mechanical engineers build weapons.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
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    Norway
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    Thanks for your answers and advice!

    Well, the seller advertised it as a universal mill, and before Lazlo commented on the universal table I didn't see that it can swivel, but it sure looks like it. That's cool!

    There is some tooling with the mill, "some collets and equipment for keyways", whatever that means.

    Maybe it looks older than it is simply because Sweden was lagging behind a bit, it may be a pre-war design made well after the war?
    It has been stored indoors, but has been put outside under a tarpaulin for the last week or so.

    Sajo is still in business: http://www.sajo.se/ making CNC machines now.
    And there is a separate company, Sajo Service who have spare parts for machines from the fifties and onwards.

    The price is low so I maybe can get it scrapped (god forbid!) and get the same amount back if it turns out to be a hopeless case.


    .
    Thomas

    Problems worthy of attack prove their worth by hitting back
    - Piet Hein


  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Austin, Texas
    Posts
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    Quote Originally Posted by Thomas Staubo
    Sajo is still in business: http://www.sajo.se/ making CNC machines now.
    Shoot them an email, with some pictures. I bet they'd be willing to help identify the machine, and may even have some manuals!
    "Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did."

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
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    112

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    we had a slightly bigger version of that sajo at the shop I work for as I recall it had a standard mill taper in the horizontal, good rigid mill, straight forward electrics and gearing we would proable still have it if the idiot running it had kept oil in the lube unit.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Reading, UK
    Posts
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    Quote Originally Posted by Thomas Staubo
    Thanks for your answers and advice!
    ....
    Well, the seller advertised it as a universal mill, and before Lazlo commented on the universal table I didn't see that it can swivel, but it sure looks like it. That's cool!

    There is some tooling with the mill, "some collets and equipment for keyways", whatever that means.

    .....

    .
    Could mean it also has a slotting attachment -a sort of vertical shaping attachment- a very good find indeed

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