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Thread: maybe OT, maybe not- painting pvc

  1. #1
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    Default maybe OT, maybe not- painting pvc

    Sure I can rough up this pvc pipe and paint will stick, but I want to leave it smooth. What's a good way to get paint to stick reasonably well? Maybe just a gloss removal with 400 grit, then wash with degreaser before painting? These will get kicked a lot, so it has to be reasonably durable. I'd like to stick (groan) with normal paints if I can.

  2. #2
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    http://www.krylon.com/products/categories/plastic/

    They are great for interior, but not very good for exterior. I tried painting some plastic deck chairs and they started to peel after a year.

  3. #3

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    I have seen paint at Walmart specificly for plastic.I wouls get a piece of scrap and try cleaning it well and see how the paint for plastic worked,PVC is cheap and readily available!

    Rotate beat me to it!

  4. #4
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    I believe Krylon markets an aerosol paint for used on plastic "lawn furniture". I do not believe that furniture is PVC though. ??Maybe worth a try??

    Looks like I was beaten to my suggesion. TWICE.
    Last edited by ERBenoit; 09-10-2008 at 05:16 PM.
    Paying Attention Is Not That Expensive.

  5. #5
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    Wipe it down with MEK and immediately spray with the Krylon mentioned earlier. The MEK dissolves the surface slightly making it momentarily sticky. The paint sort of melds with the PVC, in my experience anyway.

  6. #6
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    Good answer on the MEK. I have used lacquer thinner to cut the glaze on PVC pipe before painting. It doesn't leave scratches, but you do want to use a fairly lint-free rag to do the wiping or you will wipe fuzzies into the surface. Its also nice to get the printing off the pipe in advance of painting so that it covers evenly. You would be surprised how much dark letters on white pipe want to show through some colors.

    I wonder if that Krylon paint for plastic would hold up better on something other than lawn furniture. I imagine lawn furniture wants to flex. I have some shutters I wanted to try it on, but now you have me paranoid. Other than the work, of pulling them down and cleaning them and painting, I guess I am not out anything. If they start to peel, they will have to be replaced....which is the only other alternative for changing colors anyway.

    Paul
    Paul Carpenter
    Mapleton, IL

  7. #7
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    Thanks for the replies. Krylon fusion paint it will be. I didn't know this stuff existed. Learn something everyday.

  8. #8
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    Exclamation Painting Plastics

    Check to make sure the Krylon for plastic remains flexible. If it doesn't, it will peel too. It should be a vinyl or urethane based paint to work. Degrease then wash and rinse BEFORE sanding--If sanding is necessary. Sanding before cleaning will drive any oils or contaminates into the surface and you won't get good adhesion. Don't use oil based thinners to degrease. That includes lacquer thinner! It's 60% oil based compounds! Use straight acetone.

    There's a rattle-can adhesion promoter for plastics that's available at auto paint suppliers. I'll have to run out to the shop to get the name but it's for plastic bumpers of various compounds. It's the best I've used as far as AP & Flex-add. It's also available in pints and quarts and can be added to paint (Up to 10%) to give the paint flexibility if you're not using a urethane or vinyl paint.

    There's also vinyl paints (stains) that are made specifically for vinyl and plastic materials such as seat covers and panels. It's also available at auto paint suppliers and some auto parts houses. This can be used without an adhesion promoter if the parts are CLEAN.

  9. #9
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    I tried the Krylon "etching primer" on several items over the past few months and think this stuff is just the greatest primer for all spray bomb painting of everything. I did paint some PVC in my daughters bath last month - small piece, masked things off and hit it with the etching primer, them as a complete lark hit it afterwards a few days later (letting chemicals set and fumes subside) with of all things semi gloss bathroom paint. This was in late august, things are doing quite well.

    Seeing this, I would imaghine it would work well for spray bomb painting of plastics, especially with the special Krylon fusion paints (if they mix well, check the labels).

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by CCWKen
    Don't use oil based thinners to degrease. That includes lacquer thinner! It's 60% oil based compounds! Use straight acetone.
    +1 for the acetone prep. Wipes the printing right off, leaves a nice finish.

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